How to Write a Perfect 3-Point Thesis Statement With Samples and Tips

11 December 2023

last updated

A 3-point thesis statement is a coherent statement that integrates the three essential components of a standard thesis statement, which include a topic, an assertion, and reasons justifying the claim. Basically, the topic should narrowly define the subject. In this case, defending the claim requires writers to highlight a number of reasons. It is possible through the application of conjunctions. While formulating a working 3-point thesis statement, it is crucial to ensure that this sentence is question-focused, debatable, precise, and concise. Using non-technical language, concrete, and transpicuous words can help to improve its clarity. To make it stand out, a perfect 3-point thesis statement should be an original, specific, justifiable, and socially relevant idea derived from facts.

Description of a 3-Point Thesis Statement

A thesis statement, usually placed in the introduction paragraph, is a single statement (or two) that acts as the core of an essay. Besides, this sentence acts as a guide to readers on what essays entail, including the arrangement of ideas adopted. In this case, a strong thesis statement should precisely define the essay topic by considering a definition of the main claim, have an applicable case, and cover motivations to back up the case. Therefore, in order to answer what is a 3-point thesis statement, this sentence consolidates the three key segments, which include a subject, an assertion, and pertinent reasons to support the main claim.

3 point thesis statement

Formulating a 3-Point Thesis Statement

Topic selection.

Generally, the question prompt in schools, colleges, and universities states the essay topic, and, at times, the writer is required to present a single sentence. Also, it is prudent to brainstorm on a few topics before selecting a particular theme. Basically, each argument made in an academic paper requires feasible proof. Rather than writing “democracy,” it would be wise to write “the American democracy.” Thus, the topic selected ought to be a narrow description of the essay subject.

Making an Assertion

The process of developing a strong claim begins by identifying the relationship between your idea and available information. For instance, integrating ideas, the subject, and known facts will help in formulating a viable argument. Rather than developing a personal claim, writers should make an argument that is socially relevant and easily contestable. In this case, each piece of evidence stated will aid in developing a topic sentence in the body of an academic essay. Moreover, the reasons highlighted in the paper and the order of ideas adopted in segments determine the number and arrangement of the body paragraphs.

Support Inclusion

The last part of a 3-point thesis statement involves providing reasons to back up your opinion. In particular, the application of conjunctions, such as “because,” “as,” “due,” “although,” and “since,” helps in integrating a claim and justification. Then, highlighting shreds of evidence can be helpful, especially in determining the extent to which writers will expound their claims. In this case, this attitude determines the length of a final paper. However, the process of developing a 3-point thesis statement ought to remain adaptable until authors complete writing papers. Basically, writers may discover vital information, such as new evidence that needs relevant to the essay topic. Hence, after completing the paper, it is necessary to go through the essay and identify the information that needs to be included or eliminated from a 3-point thesis statement.  

Receive personalized assistance from our writers, ensuring your paper is both original and tailored to your needs.

A Working 3-Point Thesis Statement

Usually, the question prompt guides writers during the formulation of a 3-point thesis statement by presenting the topic. For instance, a relevant 3-point thesis statement must be present at the beginning of the paper, usually in the first paragraph. In this case, formulating a debatable and question-focused argument, followed by supporting statements or phrases, is the first step towards having 3-point thesis statement examples. However, this sentence should be precise and concise. In turn, specificity can be achieved by revising an argument several times. Also, students can select the most specific idea from a few formulated arguments to answer the same question. Hence, before presenting the essay, writers should answer the following questions:

  • Does the thesis statement at the beginning of my essay have the three key elements?
  • Is it question-focused?
  • Is it precise and concise?

How Clear Is a 3-Point Thesis Statement?

A vague thesis statement is incomprehensible to readers rendering the essay unclear. Being part of a final paper, writers must follow all the instructions regarding academic writing . In this case, writing a strong 3-point thesis statement requires writers to adopt non-technical language and eliminate vague and abstract words. The only secret to ensuring clarity of a 3-point statement is by revising it as many times as possible. Accordingly, writers should not assume that readers understand technical language unless the question prompt instructs otherwise.

Making a Thesis Statement Outstanding

A well-formulated 3-point thesis statement shows the writer’s ability to comprehend and analyze the topic successfully. Rather than simply stating a general fact and providing common reasons, writers ought to show their position by coming up with an informed argument justifiable upon reviewing the available information. In this case, the clarity of a statement is one way of making it non-biased if you want to know how do you write a 3-point thesis statement. By taking a specific approach, writers eliminate the need to announce the subject, which needs to weaken it. Secondly, writers should make a reasonable premise that neither under simplify nor overcomplicate the argument. Furthermore, it is advisable to make ideas rather than adopt formula statements or general ideas. Therefore, a good 3-point thesis statement is an original, specific, justifiable, and socially relevant idea derived from facts.

A Perfect Example of a Three-Point Thesis Statement

Sample Thesis: People cannot achieve the American Dream due to the continual racial discrimination, corrupt justice system, and ineffective education policies across many states.

Step 1 – Topic: “The American Dream.”

Comment: It is a socially relevant topic.

Step 2 – Assertion : “People cannot achieve.”

Comment: The writer’s position is that the American Dream is unrealizable, a claim that will act as the essay basis.

Step 3 – Support With Three Points :

  • Continual racial discrimination.
  • Corrupt justice system.
  • Ineffective education policies across many states.

Comment: There are three reasons justifying the writer’s claim.

This is a perfect example of a thesis statement incorporating the three key elements. Basically, every American citizen yearns for an ideal America where equality of opportunity is available for all people. Hence, the “American dream” is a feasible topic. While some individuals may oppose this statement by highlighting the reasons why it is possible to have a perfect America, this essay will focus on the impossibility by having three body paragraphs based on the three reasons.

To Learn More, Read Relevant Articles

Apply texas essay prompts with tips and samples, essay on parasitic worms hold back human progress.

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . It usually comes near the end of your introduction .

Your thesis will look a bit different depending on the type of essay you’re writing. But the thesis statement should always clearly state the main idea you want to get across. Everything else in your essay should relate back to this idea.

You can write your thesis statement by following four simple steps:

  • Start with a question
  • Write your initial answer
  • Develop your answer
  • Refine your thesis statement

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

What is a thesis statement, placement of the thesis statement, step 1: start with a question, step 2: write your initial answer, step 3: develop your answer, step 4: refine your thesis statement, types of thesis statements, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay. It is a signpost telling the reader what the essay will argue and why.

The best thesis statements are:

  • Concise: A good thesis statement is short and sweet—don’t use more words than necessary. State your point clearly and directly in one or two sentences.
  • Contentious: Your thesis shouldn’t be a simple statement of fact that everyone already knows. A good thesis statement is a claim that requires further evidence or analysis to back it up.
  • Coherent: Everything mentioned in your thesis statement must be supported and explained in the rest of your paper.

Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services

Discover proofreading & editing

The thesis statement generally appears at the end of your essay introduction or research paper introduction .

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts and among young people more generally is hotly debated. For many who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education: the internet facilitates easier access to information, exposure to different perspectives, and a flexible learning environment for both students and teachers.

You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis , early in the writing process . As soon as you’ve decided on your essay topic , you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

You might already have a question in your assignment, but if not, try to come up with your own. What would you like to find out or decide about your topic?

For example, you might ask:

After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process .

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

Now you need to consider why this is your answer and how you will convince your reader to agree with you. As you read more about your topic and begin writing, your answer should get more detailed.

In your essay about the internet and education, the thesis states your position and sketches out the key arguments you’ll use to support it.

The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education because it facilitates easier access to information.

In your essay about braille, the thesis statement summarizes the key historical development that you’ll explain.

The invention of braille in the 19th century transformed the lives of blind people, allowing them to participate more actively in public life.

A strong thesis statement should tell the reader:

  • Why you hold this position
  • What they’ll learn from your essay
  • The key points of your argument or narrative

The final thesis statement doesn’t just state your position, but summarizes your overall argument or the entire topic you’re going to explain. To strengthen a weak thesis statement, it can help to consider the broader context of your topic.

These examples are more specific and show that you’ll explore your topic in depth.

Your thesis statement should match the goals of your essay, which vary depending on the type of essay you’re writing:

  • In an argumentative essay , your thesis statement should take a strong position. Your aim in the essay is to convince your reader of this thesis based on evidence and logical reasoning.
  • In an expository essay , you’ll aim to explain the facts of a topic or process. Your thesis statement doesn’t have to include a strong opinion in this case, but it should clearly state the central point you want to make, and mention the key elements you’ll explain.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

  • Choosing Essay Topic
  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

Follow these four steps to come up with a thesis statement :

  • Ask a question about your topic .
  • Write your initial answer.
  • Develop your answer by including reasons.
  • Refine your answer, adding more detail and nuance.

The thesis statement should be placed at the end of your essay introduction .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

McCombes, S. (2023, August 15). How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/

Is this article helpful?

Shona McCombes

Shona McCombes

Other students also liked, how to write an essay introduction | 4 steps & examples, how to write topic sentences | 4 steps, examples & purpose, academic paragraph structure | step-by-step guide & examples, what is your plagiarism score.

The Classroom | Empowering Students in Their College Journey

How to Write a Three Point Thesis Statement

Kristina Barroso

What Is a Thesis Statement?

How to develop three points for a thesis statement, what are characteristics of a strong thesis statement.

Some aspects of writing are more challenging than others. Most high school and college students tasked with writing a thesis statement understand that it generally falls into the more challenging camp. Whether you are a skilled writer who approaches writing assignments with enthusiasm or a struggling writer who dreads them, knowing how to craft a quality thesis statement is the key to writing an effective essay or research paper.

A thesis statement is the core of an essay. It is usually one sentence, which is often placed at the end of the introduction, and lets the reader know what the essay will be about. A proper thesis will present your argument in an intriguing and confident manner.

If done properly, your thesis statement should read much like an outline in sentence form. To do this, it might preview multiple aspects of the argument that will be in your body paragraphs. Essays that are missing a thesis statement or have one that is inadequate will be harder for the writer to write and more challenging for the reader to follow and understand.

A standard thesis statement has three main components: ​ a narrowly defined topic, a claim and reasons that support the claim. ​ If you want a strong thesis statement, you need to make sure that all three of these points are included in it.

First, identify your topic and narrow it down as much as possible. Clothing, for example, is too broad of a topic for a thesis statement. You could narrow it down to uniforms, but that is still too vague to truly know what type of uniforms the essay will explore. School uniforms is an example of a narrowly defined topic for a thesis statement.

Next, make a specific claim about the topic. Your claim is basically an assertion or opinion about the topic, but it needs to be debatable rather than obvious and socially relevant rather than personal. I like school uniforms because they make me feel proud of my school, for example, is not debatable and is only relevant to you. School uniforms should be required is a better claim because it is debatable and socially relevant.

Finally, include reasons that will support the claim you made, which are basically the “because” part of your thesis statement. Most essays require ​ at least three reasons ​ to properly support a claim. The reasons should be specifically mentioned without going into further detail at the moment. The details and examples belong in your body paragraphs, not your thesis statement.

To figure out which reasons to include, identify the three main points you would like to make about your claim. These three main points essentially outline how the rest of your essay will be organized. The first reason will be the sole focus of your first body paragraph where you will use evidence and examples to support that reason. The second reason will be the sole focus of your second body paragraph, and the third reason will be the focus of your third body paragraph.

So, an example three-point thesis statement (if you were making an argument about school uniforms) would be: School uniforms should be required because they make school safer, promote school spirit and save parents money.

A strong thesis statement is one that includes all three essential components of a narrowly defined topic, debatable and socially relevant claim and reasons to support the claim. To develop a strong thesis statement, consider what you want your readers to know and why it is important.

“Zoos are bad” is an example of an incomplete and inadequate thesis statement because the claim is not very debatable and does not include any supporting reasons. It is not developed and presents no arguments.

A stronger thesis statement would be more like: “Zoos should be banned because they are unethical, they change natural animal behavior, and they pose unnecessary risks to the animals in their care.” This thesis statement includes all of the necessary components and tells the reader exactly what points will be explored and supported in the essay.

Related Articles

How to Write an Introduction to a Reflective Essay

How to Write an Introduction to a Reflective Essay

How to Write an Essay on Transportation Problems

How to Write an Essay on Transportation Problems

A Good Thesis Topic

A Good Thesis Topic

How to write a rebuttal speech.

Informative Writing Techniques

Informative Writing Techniques

The Parts of an Argument

The Parts of an Argument

How to Set Up a Rhetorical Analysis

How to Set Up a Rhetorical Analysis

How to Write a Controlling Idea Essay

How to Write a Controlling Idea Essay

Kristina Barroso earned a B.A. in Psychology from Florida International University and works full-time as a classroom teacher in a public school. She teaches middle school English to a wide range of students from struggling readers to advanced and gifted populations. In her spare time, she loves writing articles about education for TheClassroom.com, WorkingMother and other education sites.

Examples logo

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples

A 3-point thesis statement is a concise yet potent tool that outlines the main arguments of your paper. By presenting three key points, it guides readers through your central ideas and supports your position. In this guide, we’ll explore how to create compelling 3-point thesis statements , along with valuable tips to ensure clarity, coherence, and persuasive strength in your academic writing.

Definition of a 3 Point Thesis Statement

A 3-point thesis statement is a succinct and focused sentence that outlines the main arguments or points you intend to address in your paper. It serves as a roadmap for your readers, indicating the core topics or themes you’ll explore while presenting your stance or perspective on a particular issue.

Example of a 3 Point Thesis Statement

Topic: The Impact of Climate Change on Biodiversity

Thesis Statement: “The accelerating effects of climate change threaten global biodiversity through temperature shifts, habitat degradation, and altered migration patterns.”

In this example, the 3-point thesis statement clearly presents the three main points that will be discussed in the paper: temperature shifts, habitat degradation, and altered migration patterns. These points provide a structured framework for the upcoming argumentative analysis.

100 Three Point Thesis Statement Examples

three point thesis statement examples

Size: 643 KB

A 3-point thesis statement succinctly outlines central arguments, providing a roadmap for focused discussions. Below are 100 examples spanning various subjects, each followed by a brief 60-word description:

  • Cyberbullying Effects on Adolescents Cyberbullying adversely impacts adolescents’ mental health, self-esteem, and academic performance. This thesis addresses the detrimental effects of cyberbullying on adolescents’ psychological well-being, academic achievement, and self-perception.
  • Renewable Energy Solutions Renewable energy systems contribute to sustainability through reduced emissions, resource conservation, and energy independence. This thesis explores the multifaceted benefits of renewable energy, including its role in combating climate change, conserving resources, and fostering energy autonomy.
  • Gender Stereotypes in Media Media perpetuates gender stereotypes through representation, roles, and normalized behaviors. Focusing on media’s influence, this thesis analyzes how gender stereotypes are reinforced through portrayal, societal roles, and the reinforcement of normalized behaviors.
  • The Impact of Social Media on Politics Social media shapes political discourse by influencing awareness, engagement, and public opinion. Examining the intersection of technology and politics, this thesis delves into how social media platforms shape political discussions by impacting awareness, engagement, and public sentiment.
  • Cultural Diversity in Education Incorporating diverse perspectives in education enhances critical thinking, empathy, and global understanding. This thesis underscores the significance of integrating diverse viewpoints into educational curricula, fostering skills such as critical thinking, empathy, and cross-cultural awareness.
  • Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Job Market Artificial intelligence transforms employment landscapes by reshaping job roles, skill demands, and the need for adaptability. Investigating AI’s influence on jobs, this thesis explores how automation shifts job responsibilities, necessitates new skills, and emphasizes the importance of adaptability.
  • Effects of Social Media on Teenage Body Image Social media shapes teenage body image through comparisons, idealized representations, and societal beauty standards. This thesis delves into how social media influences teenagers’ perceptions of body image by promoting comparisons, unrealistic ideals, and cultural beauty norms.
  • Ethical Implications of Genetic Engineering Genetic engineering raises ethical concerns over altering organisms, patenting life forms, and unforeseen ecological consequences. Analyzing the ethical dimensions, this thesis examines debates surrounding genetic modification, including ethical dilemmas, intellectual property, and environmental risks.
  • Education’s Role in Addressing Poverty Education is a catalyst for poverty alleviation by fostering skills, knowledge, and socio-economic mobility. This thesis emphasizes education’s pivotal role in breaking the cycle of poverty through skill development, knowledge acquisition, and improved economic prospects.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Polarization Media exacerbates political polarization by disseminating biased information, echo chambers, and fostering extremism. Investigating media’s role, this thesis explores how biased reporting, echo chambers, and extremist content contribute to the widening political divide.
  • Environmental Conservation and Economic Growth Environmental conservation and economic growth can coexist through sustainable practices, green technologies, and eco-tourism. This thesis examines the compatibility of preserving the environment and promoting economic development by emphasizing sustainable practices, technology, and eco-friendly industries.
  • Impacts of Social Media on Interpersonal Relationships Social media alters interpersonal relationships by affecting communication dynamics, intimacy, and personal interactions. Exploring technology’s influence on relationships, this thesis analyzes how social media shapes communication patterns, intimacy levels, and face-to-face interactions.
  • Globalization’s Effects on Cultural Diversity Globalization both enriches and endangers cultural diversity through cultural exchange, homogenization, and cultural appropriation. This thesis examines globalization’s dual effects, including the enrichment of cultural exchange and the challenges of cultural homogenization and appropriation.
  • The Role of Education in Promoting Environmental Stewardship Education fosters environmental stewardship by instilling awareness, responsibility, and sustainable behaviors. Addressing the intersection of education and the environment, this thesis underscores how education cultivates environmental consciousness, accountability, and sustainable practices.
  • Artificial Intelligence and Healthcare Diagnostics Artificial intelligence revolutionizes healthcare diagnostics through precise analysis, early detection, and improved patient outcomes. Exploring AI’s impact on healthcare, this thesis assesses how AI enhances medical diagnoses by providing accurate analyses, detecting conditions earlier, and optimizing patient care.
  • Media’s Influence on Consumer Behavior Media shapes consumer behavior by creating desires, trends, and influencing purchasing decisions. Focusing on media’s sway, this thesis examines how advertising and media content drive consumer desires, shape trends, and impact buying choices.
  • Education’s Role in Fostering Tolerance and Inclusion Education cultivates tolerance and inclusion by promoting empathy, understanding, and dismantling stereotypes. This thesis highlights how education plays a vital role in creating inclusive societies through empathy-building, stereotype deconstruction, and fostering understanding.
  • Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence Development Ethical concerns surround AI development due to bias, privacy invasion, and the potential for autonomous decision-making. Addressing the ethical dimensions, this thesis evaluates the moral implications associated with AI development, including issues of bias, privacy, and decision-making autonomy.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Engagement Media influences political engagement by shaping public opinion, mobilizing activism, and framing political narratives. Examining media’s role in politics, this thesis analyzes how media outlets shape public perceptions, drive activism, and contribute to the framing of political issues.
  • Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security Sustainable agriculture ensures food security through ecological practices, crop diversity, and responsible resource management. Investigating the relationship between agriculture and food security, this thesis explores how sustainable practices, diverse crops, and resource conservation bolster global food supplies
  • Technology’s Impact on Education Technology transforms education through online learning, personalized instruction, and innovative teaching methods. Examining the intersection of technology and education, this thesis assesses how digital tools reshape learning environments, enhance personalization, and revolutionize teaching techniques.
  • Effects of Social Media on Mental Health Social media affects mental health through comparison, cyberbullying, and the pressure of maintaining online personas. Investigating mental health implications, this thesis explores how social media contributes to anxiety, depression, and other mental health challenges through comparison, bullying, and curated online identities.
  • The Role of Literature in Shaping Societal Norms Literature shapes societal norms by reflecting culture, challenging conventions, and fostering critical discourse. Examining literature’s impact, this thesis analyzes how literary works influence societal values, prompt reflection, and challenge established norms.
  • Online Privacy and Personal Data Protection Online privacy hinges on protecting personal data from breaches, surveillance, and unauthorized use. Addressing digital security, this thesis explores the complexities of safeguarding personal information from cyber threats, unauthorized access, and surveillance.
  • Media’s Role in Shaping Historical Narratives Media influences historical narratives by framing events, shaping memory, and emphasizing certain perspectives. Focusing on media’s historical impact, this thesis examines how media narratives influence collective memory, historical understanding, and the framing of significant events.
  • Economic Inequality and Access to Education Economic inequality affects education access through disparities in resources, quality, and opportunities. Addressing the connection between wealth disparity and education, this thesis explores how economic inequalities impact access to quality education and opportunities.
  • Influence of Social Media on Democracy Social media affects democracy by shaping political discourse, enabling citizen participation, and disseminating information. Examining the intersection of technology and politics, this thesis assesses how social media platforms influence democratic processes, political engagement, and information dissemination.
  • Effects of Climate Change on Coastal Communities Climate change poses risks to coastal communities through rising sea levels, extreme weather events, and erosion. Investigating climate impacts, this thesis explores how rising temperatures and changing weather patterns threaten coastal areas with sea-level rise, storms, and erosion.
  • The Role of Art in Cultural Preservation Art contributes to cultural preservation by conveying heritage, identity, and historical narratives. Focusing on artistic expression, this thesis examines how art serves as a vessel for cultural memory, preservation of traditions, and the portrayal of historical stories.
  • Media’s Influence on Beauty Standards Media shapes beauty standards through idealized images, promoting unrealistic ideals, and setting cultural norms. Analyzing media’s role in shaping perceptions of beauty, this thesis explores how media images influence cultural definitions of attractiveness and self-worth.
  • The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Ethics Artificial intelligence raises ethical concerns related to bias, decision-making, and the potential for autonomous systems. Addressing the ethical dimensions of AI, this thesis evaluates how machine learning technologies introduce ethical dilemmas in areas such as bias, decision-making, and autonomy.
  • Literature’s Exploration of Social Injustice Literature critiques social injustice by depicting marginalized experiences, advocating for change, and prompting reflection. This thesis analyzes how literary works shed light on societal inequalities, advocate for marginalized voices, and inspire social change.
  • Effects of Video Games on Cognitive Development Video games impact cognitive development through problem-solving, spatial awareness, and enhanced multitasking skills. Examining the influence of gaming, this thesis explores how interactive digital entertainment contributes to cognitive skill development in areas such as problem-solving and multitasking.
  • The Role of Education in Gender Equality Education empowers gender equality by challenging stereotypes, promoting opportunities, and fostering inclusive mindsets. Addressing the intersection of education and gender, this thesis emphasizes how educational systems contribute to dismantling gender stereotypes, increasing opportunities, and promoting gender inclusivity.
  • Effects of Social Media on News Consumption Social media shapes news consumption patterns through personalized feeds, viral content, and the spread of misinformation. Investigating media’s impact on news consumption, this thesis examines how social media algorithms, viral content, and misinformation affect the way individuals access and interpret news.
  • Urbanization’s Impact on Mental Health Urbanization affects mental health through overcrowding, noise pollution, and limited access to green spaces. Exploring the psychological consequences of urban living, this thesis analyzes how city environments influence mental well-being through factors such as noise, density, and lack of natural spaces.
  • The Role of Literature in Empathy Cultivation Literature cultivates empathy by portraying diverse experiences, fostering emotional connections, and promoting understanding. This thesis explores how literary narratives foster empathy by encouraging readers to connect emotionally with characters from various backgrounds and circumstances.
  • Effects of Online Learning on Educational Equity Online learning impacts educational equity by addressing accessibility, offering flexible options, and widening disparities. Focusing on digital education, this thesis examines how online learning platforms both address and exacerbate disparities in education access and quality.
  • Media’s Influence on Public Health Attitudes Media shapes public health attitudes by disseminating health information, addressing stigmas, and promoting healthy behaviors. Examining media’s role in health communication, this thesis analyzes how media platforms influence public perceptions, spread health-related information, and contribute to behavior change.
  • Impact of Technology on Family Dynamics Technology affects family dynamics by altering communication, screen time habits, and the balance between virtual and face-to-face interactions. This thesis explores how technology influences the ways families communicate, spend time together, and navigate the integration of digital devices into daily life
  • Impacts of Social Media on Teen Mental Health Social media influences teen mental health through comparison, online bullying, and the pressure to curate a perfect image. Focusing on adolescent well-being, this thesis examines how social media usage affects mental health, contributing to issues such as low self-esteem, anxiety, and depression.
  • The Role of Literature in Empowerment Literature empowers individuals by providing representation, voicing marginalized perspectives, and fostering a sense of agency. Addressing the transformative power of literature, this thesis explores how literary works empower individuals by offering diverse role models, amplifying underrepresented voices, and encouraging self-expression.
  • Effects of Screen Time on Child Development Excessive screen time influences child development through cognitive impacts, sedentary behaviors, and altered social interactions. Investigating digital media’s impact on children, this thesis analyzes how prolonged screen time affects cognitive development, physical activity, and social skills in early childhood.
  • Media’s Role in Shaping Cultural Identities Media influences cultural identities by reflecting representation, perpetuating stereotypes, and shaping societal perceptions. This thesis examines how media shapes cultural identities by influencing how different groups are represented, constructing stereotypes, and influencing cultural perceptions.
  • The Impact of Online Shopping on Retail Industry Online shopping transforms the retail industry through convenience, global access, and the rise of e-commerce platforms. Focusing on the evolving retail landscape, this thesis explores how digital commerce platforms have revolutionized shopping behaviors, affecting traditional retail structures.
  • The Role of Literature in Social Change Literature drives social change by sparking awareness, prompting activism, and encouraging critical engagement with societal issues. This thesis delves into how literature serves as a catalyst for social transformation by raising awareness, mobilizing readers, and advocating for change.
  • Effects of Technology on Sleep Patterns Technology disrupts sleep patterns through blue light exposure, screen time before bed, and the impact on circadian rhythms. This thesis examines how technology usage, particularly before sleep, affects sleep quality, circadian rhythms, and overall well-being.
  • Media’s Influence on Consumerism Media drives consumerism through advertising, influencing purchasing behavior, and shaping materialistic values. Investigating media’s impact on consumption, this thesis analyzes how advertisements, marketing strategies, and media content influence consumer choices and materialistic attitudes.
  • The Impact of Virtual Reality on Education Virtual reality transforms education through immersive learning experiences, simulations, and interactive engagement. Exploring the intersection of technology and education, this thesis assesses how virtual reality enhances learning by creating immersive environments, simulations, and interactive content.
  • Effects of Social Media on Friendship Dynamics Social media affects friendship dynamics by redefining connection, altering communication, and influencing group dynamics. Analyzing the digitalization of friendships, this thesis explores how social media platforms impact the nature of friendships, communication patterns, and group interactions.
  • The Role of Literature in Fostering Resilience Literature fosters resilience by portraying characters’ coping strategies, resilience narratives, and encouraging emotional growth. This thesis highlights how literary narratives provide readers with insights into resilience strategies, offering examples of characters overcoming adversity and promoting emotional growth.
  • Effects of Technology on Workplace Productivity Technology influences workplace productivity through automation, remote work tools, and digital communication platforms. Examining technology’s influence on work environments, this thesis assesses how digital tools enhance efficiency, promote remote collaboration, and reshape traditional work structures.
  • Media’s Role in Public Opinion Formation Media shapes public opinion by framing news, influencing perceptions, and molding societal attitudes toward current events. Investigating media’s impact on public discourse, this thesis analyzes how media outlets influence public perceptions, frame news narratives, and contribute to the formation of public opinions.
  • The Impact of Music on Mood Regulation Music influences mood regulation through emotional resonance, stress reduction, and the ability to evoke specific feelings. Focusing on the therapeutic effects of music, this thesis examines how music selection and listening habits impact emotional well-being, stress management, and mood enhancement.
  • The Role of Literature in Environmental Awareness Literature raises environmental awareness by highlighting ecological issues, inspiring stewardship, and promoting sustainable values. Addressing the environmental impact of literature, this thesis explores how literary works contribute to environmental consciousness, advocacy for sustainable practices, and the dissemination of ecological knowledge.
  • Effects of Online Communication on Language Evolution Online communication affects language evolution through text abbreviations, emojis, and the emergence of digital linguistic norms. Exploring the linguistic impact of digital communication, this thesis assesses how online platforms influence language evolution, leading to the emergence of new linguistic norms, abbreviations, and visual symbols.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Participation Media shapes political participation by influencing voter engagement, political awareness, and mobilization efforts. Focusing on media’s role in democracy, this thesis analyzes how media platforms impact political engagement, disseminate information, and influence citizens’ participation in political processes.
  • The Impact of Technology on Creative Expression Technology transforms creative expression through digital tools, online platforms, and innovative art forms. This thesis examines how technology empowers artists to explore new mediums, collaborate globally, and redefine creative boundaries in the digital age.
  • The Role of Literature in Historical Preservation Literature preserves history by documenting cultural narratives, recording lived experiences, and offering insights into past societies. Addressing literature’s historical significance, this thesis explores how literary works serve as windows into past eras, preserving cultural memories and societal contexts.
  • Effects of Video Game Violence on Aggression Video game violence influences aggression through desensitization, aggressive thoughts, and altered social behaviors. Investigating the psychological impact of gaming, this thesis analyzes how exposure to violent video games affects aggression levels, cognitive responses, and social interactions
  • The Impact of Technology on Family Communication Technology alters family communication through digital devices, social media, and virtual interactions. Focusing on family dynamics, this thesis explores how technology affects communication patterns, family bonding, and the challenges of maintaining meaningful connections in the digital era.
  • Effects of Social Media on Political Polarization Social media exacerbates political polarization through filter bubbles, echo chambers, and the reinforcement of ideological beliefs. Analyzing the relationship between social media and politics, this thesis investigates how online platforms contribute to the polarization of public opinion by reinforcing preexisting beliefs and narrowing exposure to diverse perspectives.
  • The Role of Literature in Identity Formation Literature contributes to identity formation by reflecting cultural heritage, exploring self-discovery, and examining personal narratives. Addressing the intersection of literature and identity, this thesis explores how literary works contribute to the formation of individual and cultural identities, fostering self-awareness and cultural understanding.
  • Effects of Technology on Human Relationships Technology impacts human relationships by altering social interactions, intimacy dynamics, and the balance between virtual and real-world connections. Investigating the influence of digital devices on interpersonal connections, this thesis examines how technology shapes the nature of relationships, emotional intimacy, and face-to-face interactions.
  • Media’s Influence on Fear and Perception Media shapes fear and perception through sensationalism, framing, and the selective presentation of information. Focusing on media’s psychological impact, this thesis analyzes how media content affects public perceptions, triggers fear responses, and influences the framing of news events.
  • The Impact of Technology on Privacy Technology challenges privacy through data collection, surveillance, and the blurring of online and offline boundaries. Addressing privacy concerns in the digital age, this thesis explores how technology threatens personal privacy by enabling data collection, surveillance practices, and the erosion of traditional boundaries between public and private spaces.
  • Effects of Social Media on Body Image Social media influences body image through comparison, unrealistic beauty ideals, and promoting appearance-focused self-worth. Examining the psychological effects of digital media, this thesis assesses how social media platforms impact body image perceptions, self-esteem, and psychological well-being.
  • The Role of Literature in Challenging Authority Literature challenges authority by critiquing power structures, questioning norms, and advocating for social change. Focusing on literature’s subversive potential, this thesis explores how literary works engage with themes of power, resistance, and social critique, challenging established authority and advocating for reform.
  • Effects of Technology on Mental Health Technology influences mental health through screen addiction, social isolation, and the pressure to maintain an ideal online image. Investigating the relationship between technology usage and psychological well-being, this thesis analyzes how digital devices impact mental health, contributing to issues such as addiction, isolation, and negative self-comparisons.
  • Media’s Role in Promoting Health Behaviors Media influences health behaviors by disseminating health information, promoting positive habits, and shaping public health narratives. Addressing media’s impact on public health, this thesis explores how media platforms contribute to health awareness, behavioral change, and the dissemination of health-related information.
  • The Impact of Technology on Education Equity Technology impacts education equity by addressing access barriers, facilitating personalized learning, and promoting digital literacy. Focusing on technology’s educational implications, this thesis examines how digital tools can both bridge and exacerbate educational disparities, fostering access, inclusivity, and skills development.
  • Effects of Social Media on Political Activism Social media amplifies political activism through digital mobilization, online advocacy, and the spread of social causes. Analyzing the role of technology in political engagement, this thesis assesses how social media platforms empower individuals and groups to mobilize for political change, share advocacy messages, and influence social issues.
  • The Role of Literature in Promoting Empathy Literature fosters empathy by immersing readers in diverse experiences, building emotional connections, and enhancing understanding. Investigating literature’s capacity to cultivate compassion, this thesis explores how narrative empathy promotes understanding, encourages readers to embrace diverse perspectives, and fosters emotional resonance.
  • Effects of Technology on Attention Span Technology impacts attention span through constant stimuli, information overload, and the allure of multitasking. Addressing technology’s cognitive effects, this thesis examines how digital devices influence attentional capabilities, cognitive focus, and the challenges of sustained concentration in a digitalized world.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Disinformation Media platforms contribute to political disinformation through the spread of false information, echo chambers, and the manipulation of public opinion. Examining media’s role in disseminating misinformation, this thesis investigates how fake news, echo chambers, and algorithmic biases impact the accuracy of public discourse and democratic decision-making.
  • The Impact of Technology on Creativity Technology enhances creativity through digital tools, collaborative platforms, and the democratization of creative expression. Focusing on the relationship between technology and creative processes, this thesis explores how digital innovations empower individuals to explore new artistic mediums, collaborate across boundaries, and engage in creative experimentation.
  • Effects of Social Media on Political Engagement Social media influences political engagement through information dissemination, fostering online communities, and encouraging civic participation. This thesis investigates how social media platforms amplify political involvement by facilitating information-sharing, building virtual communities, and motivating individuals to engage in civic activities.
  • The Role of Literature in Teaching Moral Lessons Literature imparts moral lessons by portraying ethical dilemmas, consequences of actions, and encouraging ethical reflection. Exploring literature’s moral dimensions, this thesis examines how literary narratives serve as vehicles for discussing ethical challenges, prompting readers to contemplate consequences and engage in moral reasoning.
  • Effects of Technology on Physical Health Technology impacts physical health through sedentary behaviors, screen-related health issues, and disruptions to sleep patterns. Investigating the relationship between technology and physical well-being, this thesis analyzes how digital devices influence physical activity levels, posture, and overall health outcomes.
  • Media’s Influence on Social Perception Media shapes social perception through portrayal, stereotypes, and influencing attitudes toward various societal groups. Analyzing media’s role in shaping public perceptions, this thesis assesses how media content constructs societal narratives, influences attitudes, and contributes to the formation of stereotypes
  • The Impact of Technology on Privacy in Relationships Technology affects privacy in relationships through digital communication, surveillance concerns, and the blurring of boundaries. Focusing on the interplay of technology and personal relationships, this thesis explores how digital devices influence privacy dynamics, communication norms, and the challenges of maintaining boundaries.
  • Effects of Social Media on Youth Empowerment Social media empowers youth through digital activism, amplification of voices, and the mobilization of social change. Investigating the role of social media in youth engagement, this thesis assesses how online platforms enable young individuals to advocate for causes, share perspectives, and shape societal narratives.
  • The Role of Literature in Exploring Identity Literature explores identity by examining cultural heritage, personal experiences, and the journey of self-discovery. This thesis delves into how literature serves as a vehicle for individuals to explore their identities, offering insight into cultural backgrounds, personal struggles, and the quest for self-understanding.
  • Effects of Technology on Memory and Cognitive Skills Technology impacts memory and cognitive skills through information overload, reliance on digital aids, and altered memory retention. Addressing technology’s cognitive effects, this thesis examines how digital devices influence memory processes, cognitive skills, and the capacity for deep learning and critical thinking.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Trust Media shapes political trust through framing, information credibility, and influencing public perceptions of political figures. Analyzing media’s impact on political relationships, this thesis assesses how media coverage contributes to public trust or distrust in political institutions, leaders, and the information presented.
  • The Impact of Technology on Language Evolution Technology influences language evolution through digital communication, new linguistic norms, and the emergence of online language varieties. Focusing on the linguistic impact of technology, this thesis explores how digital communication platforms contribute to the evolution of language, including the development of new forms and conventions.
  • Effects of Social Media on Youth Mental Health Social media affects youth mental health through cyberbullying, the pressure to conform, and the impact of online peer comparisons. Investigating mental health challenges among young individuals, this thesis analyzes how social media contributes to anxiety, depression, and self-esteem issues among adolescents.
  • The Role of Literature in Promoting Social Justice Literature advocates for social justice by depicting injustice, amplifying marginalized voices, and inspiring collective action. Addressing literature’s role in advocating for equality, this thesis explores how literary narratives illuminate social injustices, empower marginalized communities, and prompt readers to engage in activism.
  • Effects of Technology on Human Productivity Technology influences human productivity through automation, digital distractions, and the challenges of multitasking. Examining the interplay of technology and productivity, this thesis assesses how digital devices both enhance and hinder efficiency, time management, and task completion.
  • Media’s Influence on Cultural Appropriation Media shapes cultural appropriation through portrayal, perpetuating stereotypes, and commodifying cultural elements. Focusing on media’s impact on cultural understanding, this thesis analyzes how media content contributes to cultural appropriation by presenting distorted portrayals and commodifying cultural practices.
  • The Impact of Technology on Parenting Styles Technology influences parenting styles through digital device usage, screen time management, and the challenge of balancing virtual and real-world interactions. Investigating the intersection of technology and parenting, this thesis explores how digital devices shape parenting approaches, influence family dynamics, and affect children’s development.
  • Effects of Social Media on Political Information Seeking Social media influences political information seeking through personalized news feeds, echo chambers, and filter bubbles. This thesis examines how social media platforms impact the way individuals access, interpret, and seek out political information, contributing to the customization and potential polarization of news consumption.
  • The Role of Literature in Addressing Mental Health Stigma Literature challenges mental health stigma by portraying mental health experiences, fostering empathy, and promoting open conversations. Focusing on the intersection of literature and mental health, this thesis explores how literary narratives contribute to destigmatizing mental health challenges by portraying characters’ struggles, emotions, and journeys to recovery.
  • Effects of Technology on Social Interaction Technology influences social interaction through digital communication, altered face-to-face interactions, and the challenges of maintaining personal connections. Analyzing technology’s impact on human relationships, this thesis assesses how digital devices shape the ways individuals connect, communicate, and experience social interactions.
  • Media’s Influence on Political Spin and Manipulation Media platforms contribute to political spin through biased reporting, framing, and the manipulation of public perception. Investigating media’s role in political communication, this thesis analyzes how media outlets shape public opinion by framing news narratives, promoting specific agendas, and influencing political discourse.
  • The Impact of Technology on Learning Styles Technology transforms learning styles through personalized education, online resources, and the shift toward digital learning environments. Focusing on educational advancements, this thesis explores how technology accommodates diverse learning styles, fosters individualized instruction, and alters the way students engage with educational content.
  • Effects of Social Media on Civic Engagement Social media influences civic engagement through digital activism, online petitions, and the mobilization of collective action. This thesis examines how social media platforms empower individuals to engage in civic activities, advocate for social change, and participate in online campaigns.
  • The Role of Literature in Navigating Grief and Loss Literature provides solace in grief and loss by depicting the complexities of mourning, offering catharsis, and promoting emotional healing. Addressing literature’s role in emotional support, this thesis explores how literary narratives provide readers with ways to navigate the emotional challenges of grief, loss, and mourning.
  • Effects of Technology on Environmental Awareness Technology impacts environmental awareness through online campaigns, virtual experiences, and the dissemination of environmental information. Investigating technology’s ecological impact, this thesis analyzes how digital platforms raise awareness about environmental issues, connect individuals with nature, and inspire pro-environmental behaviors.
  • Media’s Influence on Public Perception of Climate Change Media shapes public perception of climate change through framing, information presentation, and the portrayal of scientific consensus. Focusing on the media’s role in environmental discourse, this thesis assesses how media coverage impacts public understanding of climate change, influencing attitudes, policy discussions, and societal responses.

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples for Argumentative Essay

  • Gun Control Stricter gun control laws can reduce firearm-related violence by limiting access, implementing background checks, and regulating firearm sales. In an argumentative essay, explore the effectiveness of stricter gun control measures in curbing gun violence through access restrictions, background checks, and sales regulations.
  • Climate Change Human activities are the primary drivers of climate change evidenced by rising temperatures, shrinking ice caps, and increasing carbon emissions. In this essay, argue that human actions are responsible for climate change, citing evidence like temperature increases, melting ice, and escalating carbon emissions.
  • Education Reform Education reform requires revising curricula, enhancing teacher training, and implementing student-centered learning approaches to improve learning outcomes. Addressing education reform, argue that curricular updates, teacher preparation, and student-centered teaching methods are pivotal for enhancing academic achievements.
  • Capital Punishment Capital punishment should be abolished due to the risk of wrongful execution, moral concerns, and lack of proven deterrence effect. In an argumentative context, advocate for the abolition of the death penalty by discussing the potential for wrongful executions, moral dilemmas, and the lack of conclusive evidence of deterrence.
  • Online Privacy Stricter regulations, user education, and enhanced data encryption are necessary to safeguard online privacy in the digital age. Argue for improved online privacy by discussing the need for stringent regulations, educating users about digital risks, and implementing robust data encryption.
  • Animal Testing Animal testing should be replaced with alternative methods such as in vitro testing, computer simulations, and human cell studies to ensure ethical research. Take a stance against animal testing by arguing for the adoption of humane alternatives, including in vitro experiments, computer models, and human cell research.
  • School Uniforms School uniforms foster a sense of belonging, minimize socio-economic disparities, and create a focused learning environment conducive to academic success. Present a case for school uniforms, highlighting their benefits in promoting inclusivity, reducing inequality, and cultivating a focused educational environment.
  • Social Media Addiction Social media addiction requires intervention through awareness campaigns, setting digital boundaries, and promoting face-to-face interactions. Argue against the harmful effects of social media addiction, advocating for strategies like awareness initiatives, self-regulation, and prioritizing offline connections.
  • Genetic Engineering Genetic engineering raises ethical concerns due to potential ecological disruption, unforeseen health risks, and the alteration of natural genetic diversity. Present an argument against genetic engineering by discussing ecological impacts, health uncertainties, and potential consequences for biodiversity.
  • Universal Healthcare The adoption of universal healthcare improves public health outcomes by providing equitable access to medical services, reducing financial burdens, and promoting preventive care. Advocate for universal healthcare by discussing its potential to ensure healthcare equity, alleviate financial strain, and prioritize preventative measures.

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples for an Essay

  • Happiness Happiness is attainable through positive relationships, meaningful pursuits, and a balanced approach to life’s challenges. In this essay, explore the avenues to achieve happiness through fostering connections, pursuing fulfilling goals, and embracing life’s complexities.
  • Travel Travel enriches personal growth by broadening cultural perspectives, encouraging adaptability, and promoting experiential learning. Discuss the benefits of travel, emphasizing its role in expanding cultural horizons, developing adaptability, and facilitating hands-on education.
  • Leadership Effective leadership encompasses clear communication, empathetic understanding, and the ability to inspire and motivate others. Delve into the qualities of a successful leader, focusing on communication skills, empathy, and the capacity to inspire and lead by example.
  • Dreams Pursuing dreams requires determination, overcoming obstacles, and embracing failure as a stepping stone towards eventual success. Explore the journey toward realizing dreams, emphasizing the importance of resilience, facing challenges, and learning from setbacks.
  • Time Management Efficient time management involves setting priorities, utilizing effective strategies, and maintaining a healthy work-life balance. Discuss the significance of managing time wisely, covering aspects like prioritization, productivity techniques, and maintaining personal well-being.
  • Healthy Eating Maintaining a healthy diet necessitates balanced nutrition, regular physical activity, and adequate sleep to promote overall well-being and academic success. In this essay, advocate for healthy eating habits by discussing the importance of nutritional balance, exercise, and sufficient sleep in supporting academic performance.
  • Creativity Nurturing creativity involves embracing curiosity, seeking inspiration from various sources, and welcoming experimentation without fear of failure. Examine the facets of creativity, emphasizing curiosity-driven exploration, diverse sources of inspiration, and the courage to experiment.
  • Friendship Meaningful friendships are built on trust, mutual support, and shared experiences, contributing to emotional fulfillment and personal growth. Explore the essence of friendship, discussing the core elements of trust, mutual assistance, and the impact of shared moments.
  • Resilience Resilience emerges from facing adversity, developing coping strategies, and maintaining a positive outlook during challenging times. Highlight the concept of resilience, showcasing how it evolves through confronting hardships, developing coping mechanisms, and nurturing optimism.
  • Nature Conservation Nature conservation demands sustainable practices, community involvement, and legislative support to preserve biodiversity and ecological balance. Discuss the importance of protecting the environment, emphasizing sustainable behaviors, community engagement, and legal measures to maintain biodiversity.

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples in Middle School

  • Bullying Bullying prevention requires awareness campaigns, fostering empathy, and promoting open communication to create a safe and inclusive school environment. In middle school, discuss strategies to combat bullying by raising awareness, cultivating empathy, and encouraging open dialogue among students.
  • Internet Safety Internet safety education involves responsible online behavior, recognizing digital risks, and safeguarding personal information to ensure a secure online experience. Address the importance of internet safety for middle school students, focusing on responsible online conduct, cyber awareness, and protecting personal data.
  • Healthy Lifestyle Adopting a healthy lifestyle entails balanced nutrition, regular physical activity, and adequate sleep to promote overall well-being and academic success. Discuss the significance of healthy habits for middle schoolers, emphasizing the role of balanced nutrition, exercise, and sufficient sleep in supporting academic performance.
  • Peer Pressure Navigating peer pressure requires assertiveness, making informed choices, and seeking positive influences to maintain personal values and self-confidence. Address the challenges of peer pressure among middle school students, advocating for strategies like assertiveness training, informed decision-making, and seeking supportive friendships.
  • Environmental Awareness Fostering environmental awareness involves learning about ecosystems, practicing eco-friendly habits, and participating in conservation efforts to protect the planet. Explore the importance of environmental education for middle schoolers, encouraging them to learn about ecosystems, adopt eco-conscious behaviors, and engage in conservation projects.
  • Friendship Dynamics Nurturing positive friendships involves empathy, effective communication, and resolving conflicts to foster healthy and supportive relationships. Address the complexities of middle school friendships, emphasizing empathy, communication skills, and conflict resolution techniques for building strong connections.
  • Time Management Developing time management skills encompasses setting priorities, using organizational tools, and establishing routines to balance academics and leisure activities. Discuss the relevance of time management for middle school students, introducing strategies like prioritization, organization, and establishing effective routines.
  • Goal Setting Goal setting involves defining aspirations, breaking tasks into manageable steps, and persevering in the face of challenges to achieve personal ambitions. Explore the concept of goal setting among middle schoolers, encouraging them to define aspirations, create actionable plans, and cultivate resilience.
  • Cultural Diversity Embracing cultural diversity involves understanding different perspectives, promoting inclusion, and celebrating various traditions to create a harmonious school community. Address cultural diversity in middle school, advocating for cultural understanding, inclusivity, and the importance of respecting diverse backgrounds.
  • Cyberbullying Combating cyberbullying requires reporting incidents, practicing digital citizenship, and creating a culture of kindness to ensure online safety and well-being. Discuss the implications of cyberbullying for middle schoolers, emphasizing the importance of reporting, practicing responsible online behavior, and fostering a positive digital environment.

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples in Literature

  • The Great Gatsby “The Great Gatsby” portrays the disillusionment of the American Dream through characters’ pursuit of wealth, the facade of social status, and the inability to attain lasting happiness. Discuss the themes of disillusionment and the American Dream in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, exploring how characters’ materialistic pursuits and social aspirations lead to unfulfilled desires.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird “To Kill a Mockingbird” highlights social injustice through the lens of racism, the loss of innocence, and the importance of empathy in understanding others’ perspectives. Analyze Harper Lee’s novel, focusing on its exploration of racial inequality, the loss of innocence, and the value of empathy in addressing societal prejudices.
  • Romeo and Juliet “Romeo and Juliet” examines the consequences of impulsivity, the impact of familial feuds, and the significance of love transcending societal boundaries. Explore William Shakespeare’s tragedy, discussing the themes of impulsive actions, familial conflicts, and the enduring power of love that defies societal constraints.
  • 1984 “1984” critiques totalitarianism by depicting government surveillance, manipulation of language, and the suppression of individuality as dystopian manifestations of power. Analyze George Orwell’s dystopian novel, focusing on its portrayal of authoritarian control, the manipulation of information, and the degradation of personal freedoms.
  • Pride and Prejudice “Pride and Prejudice” explores societal norms, gender expectations, and the complexities of love and self-discovery as characters navigate social hierarchies. Examine Jane Austen’s classic work, delving into its examination of social class, gender roles, and the transformative power of genuine affection in overcoming biases.
  • The Catcher in the Rye “The Catcher in the Rye” presents the alienation of youth, the search for authenticity, and the complexities of growing up as Holden Caulfield navigates the challenges of adolescence. Discuss J.D. Salinger’s novel, focusing on the protagonist’s feelings of alienation, his quest for authenticity, and the portrayal of teenage angst and identity formation.
  • The Lord of the Rings “The Lord of the Rings” explores the battle between good and evil, the hero’s journey, and the significance of fellowship as characters embark on an epic quest to save Middle-earth. Analyze J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic fantasy, discussing its themes of morality, heroism, and the power of camaraderie as characters confront the forces of darkness.
  • Frankenstein “Frankenstein” delves into the consequences of unchecked ambition, the ethical implications of scientific creation, and the alienation of the outsider as Victor Frankenstein grapples with his monstrous creation. Examine Mary Shelley’s novel, addressing themes of ambition, ethics, and societal rejection as Victor Frankenstein’s scientific endeavors lead to unintended consequences.
  • The Scarlet Letter “The Scarlet Letter” explores the consequences of societal judgment, the complexities of sin and redemption, and the resilience of the human spirit as Hester Prynne navigates the aftermath of her actions. Analyze Nathaniel Hawthorne’s work, discussing its examination of guilt, societal norms, and the capacity for personal growth in the face of adversity.
  • Brave New World “Brave New World” critiques a dystopian future by depicting a society driven by consumerism, the suppression of individuality, and the manipulation of happiness as the ultimate goal. Explore Aldous Huxley’s dystopian vision, discussing its commentary on technological control, the pursuit of pleasure, and the loss of authentic human experience.

3 Point Thesis Statement Examples for Graphic Organizers

  • Solar System Understanding the solar system involves recognizing the sun as the center, identifying planets and their characteristics, and comprehending the roles of asteroids, comets, and moons. Discuss the solar system using a graphic organizer, highlighting its key components including the sun, planets, asteroids, comets, and moons, along with their distinctive features.
  • Ecosystems Exploring ecosystems involves categorizing biomes, understanding food chains and webs, and recognizing the importance of biodiversity in maintaining ecological balance. Utilize a graphic organizer to depict various biomes within ecosystems, illustrate food chains and webs, and emphasize the significance of biodiversity for ecological stability.
  • Literary Elements Analyzing literature entails identifying plot elements, character traits, and thematic concepts to gain a comprehensive understanding of narrative structure and meaning. Create a graphic organizer to analyze literary works, mapping out key elements such as plot, characters, and themes to enhance comprehension of narrative elements.
  • Historical Events Studying historical events requires sequencing chronological occurrences, contextualizing historical contexts, and identifying influential figures and their contributions. Construct a graphic organizer to explore historical events, arranging them chronologically, providing contextual information, and highlighting notable individuals and their impacts.
  • Plant Life Cycle Exploring the plant life cycle involves identifying stages from seed germination to reproduction, understanding the roles of roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, and grasping the significance of pollination. Employ a graphic organizer to depict the plant life cycle, depicting stages from seed germination to pollination and reproduction, while illustrating the roles of different plant parts.
  • Literary Genres Understanding literary genres requires categorizing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, and identifying distinguishing characteristics that define each genre’s narrative style. Use a graphic organizer to differentiate literary genres, classifying fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and drama while highlighting the unique features that define each genre.
  • Elements of a Story Analyzing the elements of a story involves identifying the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution to gain insight into narrative structure and development. Create a graphic organizer to explore the elements of a story, mapping out the key stages from exposition to resolution, enhancing comprehension of narrative progression.
  • Food Groups Understanding dietary balance entails categorizing food groups such as fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins, and dairy, and recognizing their nutritional contributions to overall health. Utilize a graphic organizer to depict food groups, categorizing fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins, and dairy while emphasizing their roles in providing essential nutrients.
  • Biographical Information Exploring biographies involves organizing key details like birth, achievements, contributions, and impact to gain insights into notable individuals’ lives and legacies. Construct a graphic organizer to analyze biographical information, arranging details such as birth, accomplishments, significant contributions, and lasting impact on society.
  • Cause and Effect Relationships Understanding cause and effect relationships entails identifying triggers and outcomes, recognizing the interconnectedness of events, and comprehending the implications of actions. Design a graphic organizer to explore cause and effect relationships, mapping out causal factors and corresponding effects to illustrate the interconnected nature of events.

Free 3 Point Thesis Statement Worksheets Download

Download our free 3 Point Thesis Statement Worksheets to enhance your writing skills. These comprehensive resources provide structured guidance on crafting impactful thesis statements for various topics. Through step-by-step exercises, you’ll learn to formulate clear arguments with three supporting points, fostering effective communication and analytical thinking. Elevate your essay writing by mastering the art of concise and persuasive thesis statements with our downloadable worksheets.

3 Point Thesis Statement Worksheet

3 point thesis statement worksheet

Size: 360 KB

3 Point Thesis Statement Worksheet Sample

3 point thesis statement sample

Size: 160 KB

Three Point Thesis Statement Worksheet Download

three point thesis statement worksheet download

Size: 170 KB

How to Write a 3 Point Thesis Statement? – Step by Step Guide

Crafting a compelling 3 Point Thesis Statement involves careful planning and a structured approach. Follow this step-by-step guide to create a clear and impactful thesis that effectively outlines your main argument and supporting points:

  • Choose Your Topic: Select a specific topic that you want to address in your essay. Ensure it’s focused enough to be thoroughly explored within the scope of your work.
  • Identify Your Main Argument: Determine the central point or argument you want to make about the chosen topic. This main idea will serve as the foundation for your thesis statement.
  • Brainstorm Supporting Points: Identify three key points that support and reinforce your main argument. These points will guide your essay’s structure and content.
  • Craft Your Thesis Statement: Combine your main argument and the three supporting points into a single, concise sentence. Ensure it clearly conveys the overall message of your essay.
  • Order and Coherence: Arrange your supporting points logically. Typically, present them in the order you’ll address them in your essay, from strongest to weakest or chronologically.
  • Avoid Ambiguity: Make sure your thesis statement is specific and unambiguous. Avoid vague language that might confuse or mislead readers.
  • Precision and Clarity: Use clear and precise language in your thesis statement. Each word should contribute to the overall clarity and accuracy of your message.
  • Revise for Consistency: Check that your thesis statement aligns with the content of your essay. Any deviations should be addressed to maintain coherence.
  • Seek Feedback: Share your thesis statement with peers or mentors for feedback. Their insights can help you refine and strengthen your argument.
  • Refine and Edit: Revise your thesis statement based on the feedback you receive. Edit for grammar, style, and conciseness.
  • Finalize Your Thesis Statement: Once satisfied, incorporate your refined thesis statement into your essay’s introduction, ensuring it provides a roadmap for readers.

By following this step-by-step guide, you can create a powerful 3 Point Thesis Statement that effectively communicates your main argument and supporting points, setting the tone for a well-structured and persuasive essay.

Tips for Writing a 3 Point Thesis Statment

  • Clarity is Key: Keep your thesis statement clear and straightforward, avoiding vague or convoluted language.
  • Singular Focus: Center your thesis around a single, focused argument to maintain a clear message.
  • Strong Supporting Points: Select three robust supporting points that directly bolster your main argument.
  • Parallel Structure: Use consistent grammatical structure for your supporting points to enhance organization.
  • Logical Order: Arrange supporting points logically, from strongest to weakest or in a coherent sequence.
  • Specific Examples: Back up your points with concrete evidence, avoiding general statements.
  • Avoid First-Person: Keep your thesis objective by refraining from using first-person pronouns.
  • Highlight Importance: Explain the significance or broader implications of your main argument and points.
  • Feedback Matters: Seek input from others to refine and strengthen your thesis statement.
  • Connect and Transition: Ensure your thesis smoothly leads into the content of your essay’s body.

Mastering the art of crafting impactful 3 Point Thesis Statements elevates your writing prowess. With a clear main argument and well-chosen supporting points, your essays gain depth and structure. Following expert tips ensures clarity, conciseness, and logical organization. This skill empowers you to communicate effectively, fostering a deeper connection with readers and enhancing the overall impact of your work.

what three prong thesis statement

AI Generator

Text prompt

  • Instructive
  • Professional

10 Examples of Public speaking

20 Examples of Gas lighting

How to Write a Three Prong Thesis

Editorial team.

Books in brown bookshelf.jpg

How to Write a Three Prong Thesis. A thesis statement is an idea that you state and prove to your readers. Write a three prong thesis to describe your argument and back it up with three points. Use proper essay structure for your thesis.

Explore this article

  • Pre-write your thesis by outlining your ideas
  • Create an introduction for your essay or report
  • Write three points
  • Include three steps
  • Use topic sentences
  • Conclude your thesis by leading into your essay

1 Pre-write your thesis by outlining your ideas

Pre-write your thesis by outlining your ideas. Use the bubble method of brainstorming to come up with three good points to use. Pick three points that will back up your argument.

2 Create an introduction for your essay or report

Create an introduction for your essay or report. Explain your topic in the first sentence and then write your thesis statement. Your thesis will describe how you are going to prove your topic sentence.

3 Write three points

Write three points that you will prove or argue in your essay. These three points should specify or back up what you are stating in your topic sentence. You will explain each of these points in your essay.

4 Include three steps

Include three steps if you are writing an explanatory essay. Include three things you will use to prove your thesis is true if you are writing an argumentative essay.

5 Use topic sentences

Use topic sentences to write these points so you can expand on the points in each paragraph of your essay. Make sure your three points will be clear because they will also be the basis of your three opening sentences for each of your paragraphs.

6 Conclude your thesis by leading into your essay

Conclude your thesis by leading into your essay. Your essay will begin with the first prong of your thesis statement.

About the Author

This article was written by the CareerTrend team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about CareerTrend, contact us [here](http://careertrend.com/about-us).

Related Articles

Three Persuasive Writing Techniques

Three Persuasive Writing Techniques

How to Write a Thesis for a Process Analysis Essay

How to Write a Thesis for a Process Analysis Essay

How to Write a 1000-Word Essay

How to Write a 1000-Word Essay

Step-by-Step Explanation of How to Write a Research Paper for Elementary Students

Step-by-Step Explanation of How to Write a Research...

How to Transition to the Body of an Essay

How to Transition to the Body of an Essay

How to Frame an Essay

How to Frame an Essay

How to Write an Opinion Paper for College

How to Write an Opinion Paper for College

How to End an Informative Paper

How to End an Informative Paper

How to Write Book Titles in an Essay

How to Write Book Titles in an Essay

How to Write an Analytical Critique

How to Write an Analytical Critique

How to Write a Suitable Objective Report

How to Write a Suitable Objective Report

How to Make a Wedding Rosary

How to Make a Wedding Rosary

How to Write an Effective Thesis Statement in Three Easy Steps

How to Write an Effective Thesis Statement in Three...

How to Write an Introduction for an Argument Essay

How to Write an Introduction for an Argument Essay

How to Write an Introduction for a Descriptive Essay

How to Write an Introduction for a Descriptive Essay

How to Write a Report in High School

How to Write a Report in High School

How to Write a Discursive Essay

How to Write a Discursive Essay

How to Write Your Argumentative Essay

How to Write Your Argumentative Essay

What Is the Term Used to Describe the Seven Divisions of the Constitution?

What Is the Term Used to Describe the Seven Divisions...

How to Restate an Expository Writing Prompt

How to Restate an Expository Writing Prompt

Regardless of how old we are, we never stop learning. Classroom is the educational resource for people of all ages. Whether you’re studying times tables or applying to college, Classroom has the answers.

  • Accessibility
  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Copyright Policy
  • Manage Preferences

© 2020 Leaf Group Ltd. / Leaf Group Media, All Rights Reserved. Based on the Word Net lexical database for the English Language. See disclaimer .

Developing a Thesis Statement

Many papers you write require developing a thesis statement. In this section you’ll learn what a thesis statement is and how to write one.

Keep in mind that not all papers require thesis statements . If in doubt, please consult your instructor for assistance.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement . . .

  • Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic.
  • Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper.
  • Is focused and specific enough to be “proven” within the boundaries of your paper.
  • Is generally located near the end of the introduction ; sometimes, in a long paper, the thesis will be expressed in several sentences or in an entire paragraph.
  • Identifies the relationships between the pieces of evidence that you are using to support your argument.

Not all papers require thesis statements! Ask your instructor if you’re in doubt whether you need one.

Identify a topic

Your topic is the subject about which you will write. Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic; or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper.

Consider what your assignment asks you to do

Inform yourself about your topic, focus on one aspect of your topic, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts, generate a topic from an assignment.

Below are some possible topics based on sample assignments.

Sample assignment 1

Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II.

Identified topic

Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis

This topic avoids generalities such as “Spain” and “World War II,” addressing instead on Franco’s role (a specific aspect of “Spain”) and the diplomatic relations between the Allies and Axis (a specific aspect of World War II).

Sample assignment 2

Analyze one of Homer’s epic similes in the Iliad.

The relationship between the portrayal of warfare and the epic simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64.

This topic focuses on a single simile and relates it to a single aspect of the Iliad ( warfare being a major theme in that work).

Developing a Thesis Statement–Additional information

Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic, or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper. You’ll want to read your assignment carefully, looking for key terms that you can use to focus your topic.

Sample assignment: Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II Key terms: analyze, Spain’s neutrality, World War II

After you’ve identified the key words in your topic, the next step is to read about them in several sources, or generate as much information as possible through an analysis of your topic. Obviously, the more material or knowledge you have, the more possibilities will be available for a strong argument. For the sample assignment above, you’ll want to look at books and articles on World War II in general, and Spain’s neutrality in particular.

As you consider your options, you must decide to focus on one aspect of your topic. This means that you cannot include everything you’ve learned about your topic, nor should you go off in several directions. If you end up covering too many different aspects of a topic, your paper will sprawl and be unconvincing in its argument, and it most likely will not fulfull the assignment requirements.

For the sample assignment above, both Spain’s neutrality and World War II are topics far too broad to explore in a paper. You may instead decide to focus on Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis , which narrows down what aspects of Spain’s neutrality and World War II you want to discuss, as well as establishes a specific link between those two aspects.

Before you go too far, however, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts. Try to avoid topics that already have too much written about them (i.e., “eating disorders and body image among adolescent women”) or that simply are not important (i.e. “why I like ice cream”). These topics may lead to a thesis that is either dry fact or a weird claim that cannot be supported. A good thesis falls somewhere between the two extremes. To arrive at this point, ask yourself what is new, interesting, contestable, or controversial about your topic.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times . Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Derive a main point from topic

Once you have a topic, you will have to decide what the main point of your paper will be. This point, the “controlling idea,” becomes the core of your argument (thesis statement) and it is the unifying idea to which you will relate all your sub-theses. You can then turn this “controlling idea” into a purpose statement about what you intend to do in your paper.

Look for patterns in your evidence

Compose a purpose statement.

Consult the examples below for suggestions on how to look for patterns in your evidence and construct a purpose statement.

  • Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis
  • Franco turned to the Allies when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from the Axis

Possible conclusion:

Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: Franco’s desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power.

Purpose statement

This paper will analyze Franco’s diplomacy during World War II to see how it contributed to Spain’s neutrality.
  • The simile compares Simoisius to a tree, which is a peaceful, natural image.
  • The tree in the simile is chopped down to make wheels for a chariot, which is an object used in warfare.

At first, the simile seems to take the reader away from the world of warfare, but we end up back in that world by the end.

This paper will analyze the way the simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64 moves in and out of the world of warfare.

Derive purpose statement from topic

To find out what your “controlling idea” is, you have to examine and evaluate your evidence . As you consider your evidence, you may notice patterns emerging, data repeated in more than one source, or facts that favor one view more than another. These patterns or data may then lead you to some conclusions about your topic and suggest that you can successfully argue for one idea better than another.

For instance, you might find out that Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis, but when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from them, he turned to the Allies. As you read more about Franco’s decisions, you may conclude that Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: his desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power. Based on this conclusion, you can then write a trial thesis statement to help you decide what material belongs in your paper.

Sometimes you won’t be able to find a focus or identify your “spin” or specific argument immediately. Like some writers, you might begin with a purpose statement just to get yourself going. A purpose statement is one or more sentences that announce your topic and indicate the structure of the paper but do not state the conclusions you have drawn . Thus, you might begin with something like this:

  • This paper will look at modern language to see if it reflects male dominance or female oppression.
  • I plan to analyze anger and derision in offensive language to see if they represent a challenge of society’s authority.

At some point, you can turn a purpose statement into a thesis statement. As you think and write about your topic, you can restrict, clarify, and refine your argument, crafting your thesis statement to reflect your thinking.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Compose a draft thesis statement

If you are writing a paper that will have an argumentative thesis and are having trouble getting started, the techniques in the table below may help you develop a temporary or “working” thesis statement.

Begin with a purpose statement that you will later turn into a thesis statement.

Assignment: Discuss the history of the Reform Party and explain its influence on the 1990 presidential and Congressional election.

Purpose Statement: This paper briefly sketches the history of the grassroots, conservative, Perot-led Reform Party and analyzes how it influenced the economic and social ideologies of the two mainstream parties.

Question-to-Assertion

If your assignment asks a specific question(s), turn the question(s) into an assertion and give reasons why it is true or reasons for your opinion.

Assignment : What do Aylmer and Rappaccini have to be proud of? Why aren’t they satisfied with these things? How does pride, as demonstrated in “The Birthmark” and “Rappaccini’s Daughter,” lead to unexpected problems?

Beginning thesis statement: Alymer and Rappaccinni are proud of their great knowledge; however, they are also very greedy and are driven to use their knowledge to alter some aspect of nature as a test of their ability. Evil results when they try to “play God.”

Write a sentence that summarizes the main idea of the essay you plan to write.

Main idea: The reason some toys succeed in the market is that they appeal to the consumers’ sense of the ridiculous and their basic desire to laugh at themselves.

Make a list of the ideas that you want to include; consider the ideas and try to group them.

  • nature = peaceful
  • war matériel = violent (competes with 1?)
  • need for time and space to mourn the dead
  • war is inescapable (competes with 3?)

Use a formula to arrive at a working thesis statement (you will revise this later).

  • although most readers of _______ have argued that _______, closer examination shows that _______.
  • _______ uses _______ and _____ to prove that ________.
  • phenomenon x is a result of the combination of __________, __________, and _________.

What to keep in mind as you draft an initial thesis statement

Beginning statements obtained through the methods illustrated above can serve as a framework for planning or drafting your paper, but remember they’re not yet the specific, argumentative thesis you want for the final version of your paper. In fact, in its first stages, a thesis statement usually is ill-formed or rough and serves only as a planning tool.

As you write, you may discover evidence that does not fit your temporary or “working” thesis. Or you may reach deeper insights about your topic as you do more research, and you will find that your thesis statement has to be more complicated to match the evidence that you want to use.

You must be willing to reject or omit some evidence in order to keep your paper cohesive and your reader focused. Or you may have to revise your thesis to match the evidence and insights that you want to discuss. Read your draft carefully, noting the conclusions you have drawn and the major ideas which support or prove those conclusions. These will be the elements of your final thesis statement.

Sometimes you will not be able to identify these elements in your early drafts, but as you consider how your argument is developing and how your evidence supports your main idea, ask yourself, “ What is the main point that I want to prove/discuss? ” and “ How will I convince the reader that this is true? ” When you can answer these questions, then you can begin to refine the thesis statement.

Refine and polish the thesis statement

To get to your final thesis, you’ll need to refine your draft thesis so that it’s specific and arguable.

  • Ask if your draft thesis addresses the assignment
  • Question each part of your draft thesis
  • Clarify vague phrases and assertions
  • Investigate alternatives to your draft thesis

Consult the example below for suggestions on how to refine your draft thesis statement.

Sample Assignment

Choose an activity and define it as a symbol of American culture. Your essay should cause the reader to think critically about the society which produces and enjoys that activity.

  • Ask The phenomenon of drive-in facilities is an interesting symbol of american culture, and these facilities demonstrate significant characteristics of our society.This statement does not fulfill the assignment because it does not require the reader to think critically about society.
Drive-ins are an interesting symbol of American culture because they represent Americans’ significant creativity and business ingenuity.
Among the types of drive-in facilities familiar during the twentieth century, drive-in movie theaters best represent American creativity, not merely because they were the forerunner of later drive-ins and drive-throughs, but because of their impact on our culture: they changed our relationship to the automobile, changed the way people experienced movies, and changed movie-going into a family activity.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast-food establishments, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize America’s economic ingenuity, they also have affected our personal standards.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast- food restaurants, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize (1) Americans’ business ingenuity, they also have contributed (2) to an increasing homogenization of our culture, (3) a willingness to depersonalize relationships with others, and (4) a tendency to sacrifice quality for convenience.

This statement is now specific and fulfills all parts of the assignment. This version, like any good thesis, is not self-evident; its points, 1-4, will have to be proven with evidence in the body of the paper. The numbers in this statement indicate the order in which the points will be presented. Depending on the length of the paper, there could be one paragraph for each numbered item or there could be blocks of paragraph for even pages for each one.

Complete the final thesis statement

The bottom line.

As you move through the process of crafting a thesis, you’ll need to remember four things:

  • Context matters! Think about your course materials and lectures. Try to relate your thesis to the ideas your instructor is discussing.
  • As you go through the process described in this section, always keep your assignment in mind . You will be more successful when your thesis (and paper) responds to the assignment than if it argues a semi-related idea.
  • Your thesis statement should be precise, focused, and contestable ; it should predict the sub-theses or blocks of information that you will use to prove your argument.
  • Make sure that you keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Change your thesis as your paper evolves, because you do not want your thesis to promise more than your paper actually delivers.

In the beginning, the thesis statement was a tool to help you sharpen your focus, limit material and establish the paper’s purpose. When your paper is finished, however, the thesis statement becomes a tool for your reader. It tells the reader what you have learned about your topic and what evidence led you to your conclusion. It keeps the reader on track–well able to understand and appreciate your argument.

what three prong thesis statement

Writing Process and Structure

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Getting Started with Your Paper

Interpreting Writing Assignments from Your Courses

Generating Ideas for

Creating an Argument

Thesis vs. Purpose Statements

Architecture of Arguments

Working with Sources

Quoting and Paraphrasing Sources

Using Literary Quotations

Citing Sources in Your Paper

Drafting Your Paper

Generating Ideas for Your Paper

Introductions

Paragraphing

Developing Strategic Transitions

Conclusions

Revising Your Paper

Peer Reviews

Reverse Outlines

Revising an Argumentative Paper

Revision Strategies for Longer Projects

Finishing Your Paper

Twelve Common Errors: An Editing Checklist

How to Proofread your Paper

Writing Collaboratively

Collaborative and Group Writing

What are your chances of acceptance?

Calculate for all schools, your chance of acceptance.

Duke University

Your chancing factors

Extracurriculars.

what three prong thesis statement

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

what three prong thesis statement

What’s Covered:

What is the purpose of a thesis statement, writing a good thesis statement: 4 steps, common pitfalls to avoid, where to get your essay edited for free.

When you set out to write an essay, there has to be some kind of point to it, right? Otherwise, your essay would just be a big jumble of word salad that makes absolutely no sense. An essay needs a central point that ties into everything else. That main point is called a thesis statement, and it’s the core of any essay or research paper.

You may hear about Master degree candidates writing a thesis, and that is an entire paper–not to be confused with the thesis statement, which is typically one sentence that contains your paper’s focus. 

Read on to learn more about thesis statements and how to write them. We’ve also included some solid examples for you to reference.

Typically the last sentence of your introductory paragraph, the thesis statement serves as the roadmap for your essay. When your reader gets to the thesis statement, they should have a clear outline of your main point, as well as the information you’ll be presenting in order to either prove or support your point. 

The thesis statement should not be confused for a topic sentence , which is the first sentence of every paragraph in your essay. If you need help writing topic sentences, numerous resources are available. Topic sentences should go along with your thesis statement, though.

Since the thesis statement is the most important sentence of your entire essay or paper, it’s imperative that you get this part right. Otherwise, your paper will not have a good flow and will seem disjointed. That’s why it’s vital not to rush through developing one. It’s a methodical process with steps that you need to follow in order to create the best thesis statement possible.

Step 1: Decide what kind of paper you’re writing

When you’re assigned an essay, there are several different types you may get. Argumentative essays are designed to get the reader to agree with you on a topic. Informative or expository essays present information to the reader. Analytical essays offer up a point and then expand on it by analyzing relevant information. Thesis statements can look and sound different based on the type of paper you’re writing. For example:

  • Argumentative: The United States needs a viable third political party to decrease bipartisanship, increase options, and help reduce corruption in government.
  • Informative: The Libertarian party has thrown off elections before by gaining enough support in states to get on the ballot and by taking away crucial votes from candidates.
  • Analytical: An analysis of past presidential elections shows that while third party votes may have been the minority, they did affect the outcome of the elections in 2020, 2016, and beyond.

Step 2: Figure out what point you want to make

Once you know what type of paper you’re writing, you then need to figure out the point you want to make with your thesis statement, and subsequently, your paper. In other words, you need to decide to answer a question about something, such as:

  • What impact did reality TV have on American society?
  • How has the musical Hamilton affected perception of American history?
  • Why do I want to major in [chosen major here]?

If you have an argumentative essay, then you will be writing about an opinion. To make it easier, you may want to choose an opinion that you feel passionate about so that you’re writing about something that interests you. For example, if you have an interest in preserving the environment, you may want to choose a topic that relates to that. 

If you’re writing your college essay and they ask why you want to attend that school, you may want to have a main point and back it up with information, something along the lines of:

“Attending Harvard University would benefit me both academically and professionally, as it would give me a strong knowledge base upon which to build my career, develop my network, and hopefully give me an advantage in my chosen field.”

Step 3: Determine what information you’ll use to back up your point

Once you have the point you want to make, you need to figure out how you plan to back it up throughout the rest of your essay. Without this information, it will be hard to either prove or argue the main point of your thesis statement. If you decide to write about the Hamilton example, you may decide to address any falsehoods that the writer put into the musical, such as:

“The musical Hamilton, while accurate in many ways, leaves out key parts of American history, presents a nationalist view of founding fathers, and downplays the racism of the times.”

Once you’ve written your initial working thesis statement, you’ll then need to get information to back that up. For example, the musical completely leaves out Benjamin Franklin, portrays the founding fathers in a nationalist way that is too complimentary, and shows Hamilton as a staunch abolitionist despite the fact that his family likely did own slaves. 

Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing

Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and that you feel like you can truly write a paper on the topic. Once you’ve done that, you can then begin writing your paper.

When writing a thesis statement, there are some common pitfalls you should avoid so that your paper can be as solid as possible. Make sure you always edit the thesis statement before you do anything else. You also want to ensure that the thesis statement is clear and concise. Don’t make your reader hunt for your point. Finally, put your thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph and have your introduction flow toward that statement. Your reader will expect to find your statement in its traditional spot.

If you’re having trouble getting started, or need some guidance on your essay, there are tools available that can help you. CollegeVine offers a free peer essay review tool where one of your peers can read through your essay and provide you with valuable feedback. Getting essay feedback from a peer can help you wow your instructor or college admissions officer with an impactful essay that effectively illustrates your point.

what three prong thesis statement

Related CollegeVine Blog Posts

what three prong thesis statement

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Developing Strong Thesis Statements

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing.

The thesis statement or main claim must be debatable

An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people.

Example of a non-debatable thesis statement:

This thesis statement is not debatable. First, the word pollution implies that something is bad or negative in some way. Furthermore, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is unambiguously good.

Example of a debatable thesis statement:

This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money. Others might feel that we should be spending more money on education. Still others could argue that corporations, not the government, should be paying to limit pollution.

Another example of a debatable thesis statement:

In this example there is also room for disagreement between rational individuals. Some citizens might think focusing on recycling programs rather than private automobiles is the most effective strategy.

The thesis needs to be narrow

Although the scope of your paper might seem overwhelming at the start, generally the narrower the thesis the more effective your argument will be. Your thesis or claim must be supported by evidence. The broader your claim is, the more evidence you will need to convince readers that your position is right.

Example of a thesis that is too broad:

There are several reasons this statement is too broad to argue. First, what is included in the category "drugs"? Is the author talking about illegal drug use, recreational drug use (which might include alcohol and cigarettes), or all uses of medication in general? Second, in what ways are drugs detrimental? Is drug use causing deaths (and is the author equating deaths from overdoses and deaths from drug related violence)? Is drug use changing the moral climate or causing the economy to decline? Finally, what does the author mean by "society"? Is the author referring only to America or to the global population? Does the author make any distinction between the effects on children and adults? There are just too many questions that the claim leaves open. The author could not cover all of the topics listed above, yet the generality of the claim leaves all of these possibilities open to debate.

Example of a narrow or focused thesis:

In this example the topic of drugs has been narrowed down to illegal drugs and the detriment has been narrowed down to gang violence. This is a much more manageable topic.

We could narrow each debatable thesis from the previous examples in the following way:

Narrowed debatable thesis 1:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just the amount of money used but also how the money could actually help to control pollution.

Narrowed debatable thesis 2:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just what the focus of a national anti-pollution campaign should be but also why this is the appropriate focus.

Qualifiers such as " typically ," " generally ," " usually ," or " on average " also help to limit the scope of your claim by allowing for the almost inevitable exception to the rule.

Types of claims

Claims typically fall into one of four categories. Thinking about how you want to approach your topic, or, in other words, what type of claim you want to make, is one way to focus your thesis on one particular aspect of your broader topic.

Claims of fact or definition: These claims argue about what the definition of something is or whether something is a settled fact. Example:

Claims of cause and effect: These claims argue that one person, thing, or event caused another thing or event to occur. Example:

Claims about value: These are claims made of what something is worth, whether we value it or not, how we would rate or categorize something. Example:

Claims about solutions or policies: These are claims that argue for or against a certain solution or policy approach to a problem. Example:

Which type of claim is right for your argument? Which type of thesis or claim you use for your argument will depend on your position and knowledge of the topic, your audience, and the context of your paper. You might want to think about where you imagine your audience to be on this topic and pinpoint where you think the biggest difference in viewpoints might be. Even if you start with one type of claim you probably will be using several within the paper. Regardless of the type of claim you choose to utilize it is key to identify the controversy or debate you are addressing and to define your position early on in the paper.

what three prong thesis statement

  • Academic Writing

The Three-Ingredient Thesis Statement

by Purdue Global Academic Success Center and Writing Center · Published August 19, 2015 · Updated August 10, 2015

Molly Wright Starkweather, MA, Kaplan University Writing Center Tutor

When teaching thesis statements, the standard advice from teaching guides varies depending on the expertise of the student and the content area and level of study of the course. In the Kaplan Guide to Successful Writing , a thesis statement is considered effective if it sticks to one idea, focuses on a reasonably sized aspect of that idea, takes a clear position on the subject, and uses solid support. These are quality goals for students, but how does a student get in the right frame of mind to begin writing a thesis statement after having conducted all the research? A first term student will likely consider the main points to be included and build a thesis statement from there, which works fairly well in shorter assignments, but it can become an unwieldy proposition when it comes to more complex compositions.

Graduate students might not be expected to write the same sort of thesis statement as first year composition students, but they can benefit from considering a focused central argument in a sentence or two for the sake of those reading their papers. One of the reasons it is important to distinguish the type of central argument graduate students will make in their writing is because it might be easy to confuse a thesis statement with a graduate thesis, which is a specific type of original research report described in our Graduate Thesis resource .

A formula I have developed for thesis statements takes into consideration the notion that a thesis statement is often designed to address a situation in a field of study, typically solving a specific problem by offering a specific solution. The first ingredient in an effective thesis statement, then, is to mention the problem briefly. A template for mentioning the problem might look like one of the phrases below.

Considering the challenge of _________

When addressing the situation of __________

Professionals who face the scenario of __________

Here is how one thesis might begin.

Considering the challenge of keeping infants safe on airplane flights

Next, it is always good communication to have a solution in mind when mentioning a problem. Make sure to mention the specific solution for the specific problem being addressed, and consider one of the phrases below as a template for introducing the solution.

… an effective approach might be _________

… one good solution is _________

… the best response is to _________

Now, the effective thesis started earlier might go on to look like this. Considering the challenge of keeping infants safe on airplane flights, the most effective solution is to have the infant ride in a rear-facing car seat secured to the infant’s own airplane seat.

Finally, effective thesis statements can offer the reader a sense of what to expect in the body paragraphs of the paper. One way to incorporate the main points from the body paragraphs is to consider why the solution being offered in the thesis statement is effective or perhaps even the best solution. Adding “because” after naming the solution in the thesis can pave the way for establishing the main points right there within the same sentence. Here is an example of how all three ingredients—mentioning the challenge at hand, the solution, and the main points supporting the solution—can make for an effective thesis statement.

Considering the challenge of protecting infants on flights, the most effective solution is for the infant to be rear-facing in a car seat, because this solution addresses an infant’s physical development, the latest safety guidelines from experts on child travel safety, and the need for parents to protect themselves in a crash.

This is only one model for an effective thesis statement, so I encourage those reading this blog entry to consider other models for thesis statements as well. No matter what, make sure to phrase the central argument or main point or thesis statement based on the assignment instructions and any other supporting material (like a rubric) provided by the professor.

Share this:

  • Click to email a link to a friend (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)
  • Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)
  • Click to print (Opens in new window)

Tags: academic writing Thesis statements

  • Next story  Meet Some Kaplan University Writing Center Tutors
  • Previous story  How to Give Criticism – Positively

You may also like...

Three common apa mistakes students make.

February 11, 2015

 by Purdue Global Academic Success Center and Writing Center · Published February 11, 2015 · Last modified February 9, 2015

what three prong thesis statement

Destroying The He-Himself Syndrome: Getting Rid of Words and Phrases That Are Obvious and Bloat One’s Writing

September 17, 2021

 by Errol Craig Sull · Published September 17, 2021 · Last modified September 16, 2021

But the Sentence is Grammatically Correct . . .

May 1, 2013

 by · Published May 1, 2013

4 Responses

  • Pingbacks 0

Molly, once again a great piece of work informative, short, sweet, and to the point! Love it. KB

Thank you! It is great when we as professionals find a simple approach that accomplishes our goals.

Molly – I love this approach. I’ve actually done a graphic organizer to help students develop what I call a three prong thesis. I also share with them that when I write an article, I start with one as well. I may not always end with one because professional writing needs more than that, but after so many years of forming the thesis in my mind this way, it is the way my brain works.

Thanks, Teresa! I agree that the three-prong approach might be a good springboard for the varying needs of professional writing. I think we have a potential resource on our hands, eh?

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email.

Thesis Statement

“Three Pronged”

What IS the thesis statement?

•The central message of the essay

•Preparation for the reader

•A road map of the essay

•A one sentence summary of your essay

Everything in your essay will support your thesis

A Three-Pronged Thesis Statement

• You will use a three-prong thesis statement

•3-prongs means that it has 3 important parts.

•Each prong is a sub-topic

•Each prong will be elaborated into a paragraph (the 3 “body” paragraphs)

The snow, sports, and beauty make winter the best part of the year.

Thomas Edison was influential because he

created the light bulb, phonograph, and a telegraph transmitter.

Thomas Edison’s genius was the perfect combination of innovative thinking, hard work, and a positive attitude.

What are the sub-topics?

Some of the most serious problems in today’s inner-city schools are the overcrowded classroom, the low percentage of trained teachers, and the lack of resources such as textbooks for students.

1. overcrowded classrooms

2. low percentage of trained teachers

3. lack of resources

Spot the thesis statement

I’ve never laughed so hard in my life. This past weekend, I had the opportunity to see the summer blockbuster Diary of a Wimpy Kid. The screenplay, casting, and directing made it the best movie I’ve seen in years. It was easy to choose a rating for this movie.

I’ve never laughed so hard in my life. This past weekend, I had the opportunity to see the summer blockbuster Diary of a Wimpy Kid. The screenplay, casting, and directing made it the best movie I’ve seen in years . It was easy to choose a rating for this movie.

“I do not like them in a box, I do not like them with a fox” (Seuss). These silly yet engaging words bring back memories of childhood storytime for millions of people across the globe. Few authors before or since Dr. Seuss have had the same kind of impact. Through his memorable characters, meaningful lessons, and mesmerizing artistry, Dr. Seuss has promoted reading throughout the world.

Let’s Write one together!

Topic: Westhampton Beach Middle School

What do we want to say about WHBMS?

What are our three supporting statements?

WHB is an awesome school because of friendly environment, helpful staff, and educational teachers.

WHB is an amazing school with a variety of people to make friends with, …

Because of the helpful staff, the friendly environment, and the great education, WHB is a great school to go to.

WHB is the best school ever because of the field trip opportunities, wonderful sports, and awesome teachers.

WHB MS is really fun because it has the best field trips, a variety of sports, and really awesome teachers.

Due to the field trips, variety of sports, and amazing teachers, this is one of the best schools I’ve ever been to.

Common Errors to Avoid

Don’t just state the topic!

In this essay I will discuss the pros and cons of eating red meat.

This essay is about World War 1.

Do NOT include statements such as I believe, in my opinion, etc. They make you sound weak or unsure.

  • I believe the government should fund additional cancer research.
  • In my opinion, World War 1 was the first modern war.

Do not just state a fact or observation as the thesis statement.

  • Every year thousands of Americans lose their lives in automobile accidents related to drunk driving.
  • World War involved many new weapons.

I, me, my, we, our, etc.

  • Translators
  • Graphic Designers
  • Editing Services
  • Academic Editing Services
  • Admissions Editing Services
  • Admissions Essay Editing Services
  • AI Content Editing Services
  • APA Style Editing Services
  • Application Essay Editing Services
  • Book Editing Services
  • Business Editing Services
  • Capstone Paper Editing Services
  • Children's Book Editing Services
  • College Application Editing Services
  • College Essay Editing Services
  • Copy Editing Services
  • Developmental Editing Services
  • Dissertation Editing Services
  • eBook Editing Services
  • English Editing Services
  • Horror Story Editing Services
  • Legal Editing Services
  • Line Editing Services
  • Manuscript Editing Services
  • MLA Style Editing Services
  • Novel Editing Services
  • Paper Editing Services
  • Personal Statement Editing Services
  • Research Paper Editing Services
  • Résumé Editing Services
  • Scientific Editing Services
  • Short Story Editing Services
  • Statement of Purpose Editing Services
  • Substantive Editing Services
  • Thesis Editing Services

Proofreading

  • Proofreading Services
  • Admissions Essay Proofreading Services
  • Children's Book Proofreading Services
  • Legal Proofreading Services
  • Novel Proofreading Services
  • Personal Statement Proofreading Services
  • Research Proposal Proofreading Services
  • Statement of Purpose Proofreading Services

Translation

  • Translation Services

Graphic Design

  • Graphic Design Services
  • Dungeons & Dragons Design Services
  • Sticker Design Services
  • Writing Services

Solve

Please enter the email address you used for your account. Your sign in information will be sent to your email address after it has been verified.

25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

JBirdwellBranson

Understanding what makes a good thesis statement is one of the major keys to writing a great research paper or argumentative essay. The thesis statement is where you make a claim that will guide you through your entire paper. If you find yourself struggling to make sense of your paper or your topic, then it's likely due to a weak thesis statement.

Let's take a minute to first understand what makes a solid thesis statement, and what key components you need to write one of your own.

Perfecting Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement always goes at the beginning of the paper. It will typically be in the first couple of paragraphs of the paper so that it can introduce the body paragraphs, which are the supporting evidence for your thesis statement.

Your thesis statement should clearly identify an argument. You need to have a statement that is not only easy to understand, but one that is debatable. What that means is that you can't just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute . An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic.

Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's cuteness is derived from its floppy ears, small body, and playfulness." These are three things that can be debated on. Some people might think that the cutest thing about puppies is the fact that they follow you around or that they're really soft and fuzzy.

All cuteness aside, you want to make sure that your thesis statement is not only debatable, but that it also actually thoroughly answers the research question that was posed. You always want to make sure that your evidence is supporting a claim that you made (and not the other way around). This is why it's crucial to read and research about a topic first and come to a conclusion later. If you try to get your research to fit your thesis statement, then it may not work out as neatly as you think. As you learn more, you discover more (and the outcome may not be what you originally thought).

Additionally, your thesis statement shouldn't be too big or too grand. It'll be hard to cover everything in a thesis statement like, "The federal government should act now on climate change." The topic is just too large to actually say something new and meaningful. Instead, a more effective thesis statement might be, "Local governments can combat climate change by providing citizens with larger recycling bins and offering local classes about composting and conservation." This is easier to work with because it's a smaller idea, but you can also discuss the overall topic that you might be interested in, which is climate change.

So, now that we know what makes a good, solid thesis statement, you can start to write your own. If you find that you're getting stuck or you are the type of person who needs to look at examples before you start something, then check out our list of thesis statement examples below.

Thesis statement examples

A quick note that these thesis statements have not been fully researched. These are merely examples to show you what a thesis statement might look like and how you can implement your own ideas into one that you think of independently. As such, you should not use these thesis statements for your own research paper purposes. They are meant to be used as examples only.

  • Vaccinations Because many children are unable to vaccinate due to illness, we must require that all healthy and able children be vaccinated in order to have herd immunity.
  • Educational Resources for Low-Income Students Schools should provide educational resources for low-income students during the summers so that they don't forget what they've learned throughout the school year.
  • School Uniforms School uniforms may be an upfront cost for families, but they eradicate the visual differences in income between students and provide a more egalitarian atmosphere at school.
  • Populism The rise in populism on the 2016 political stage was in reaction to increasing globalization, the decline of manufacturing jobs, and the Syrian refugee crisis.
  • Public Libraries Libraries are essential resources for communities and should be funded more heavily by local municipalities.
  • Cyber Bullying With more and more teens using smartphones and social media, cyber bullying is on the rise. Cyber bullying puts a lot of stress on many teens, and can cause depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts. Parents should limit the usage of smart phones, monitor their children's online activity, and report any cyber bullying to school officials in order to combat this problem.
  • Medical Marijuana for Veterans Studies have shown that the use of medicinal marijuana has been helpful to veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Medicinal marijuana prescriptions should be legal in all states and provided to these veterans. Additional medical or therapy services should also be researched and implemented in order to help them re-integrate back into civilian life.
  • Work-Life Balance Corporations should provide more work from home opportunities and six-hour workdays so that office workers have a better work-life balance and are more likely to be productive when they are in the office.
  • Teaching Youths about Consensual Sex Although sex education that includes a discussion of consensual sex would likely lead to less sexual assault, parents need to teach their children the meaning of consent from a young age with age appropriate lessons.
  • Whether or Not to Attend University A degree from a university provides invaluable lessons on life and a future career, but not every high school student should be encouraged to attend a university directly after graduation. Some students may benefit from a trade school or a "gap year" where they can think more intensely about what it is they want to do for a career and how they can accomplish this.
  • Studying Abroad Studying abroad is one of the most culturally valuable experiences you can have in college. It is the only way to get completely immersed in another language and learn how other cultures and countries are different from your own.
  • Women's Body Image Magazines have done a lot in the last five years to include a more diverse group of models, but there is still a long way to go to promote a healthy woman's body image collectively as a culture.
  • Cigarette Tax Heavily taxing and increasing the price of cigarettes is essentially a tax on the poorest Americans, and it doesn't deter them from purchasing. Instead, the state and federal governments should target those economically disenfranchised with early education about the dangers of smoking.
  • Veganism A vegan diet, while a healthy and ethical way to consume food, indicates a position of privilege. It also limits you to other cultural food experiences if you travel around the world.
  • University Athletes Should be Compensated University athletes should be compensated for their service to the university, as it is difficult for these students to procure and hold a job with busy academic and athletic schedules. Many student athletes on scholarship also come from low-income neighborhoods and it is a struggle to make ends meet when they are participating in athletics.
  • Women in the Workforce Sheryl Sandberg makes a lot of interesting points in her best-selling book, Lean In , but she only addressed the very privileged working woman and failed to speak to those in lower-skilled, lower-wage jobs.
  • Assisted Suicide Assisted suicide should be legal and doctors should have the ability to make sure their patients have the end-of-life care that they want to receive.
  • Celebrity and Political Activism Although Taylor Swift's lyrics are indicative of a feminist perspective, she should be more politically active and vocal to use her position of power for the betterment of society.
  • The Civil War The insistence from many Southerners that the South seceded from the Union for states' rights versus the fact that they seceded for the purposes of continuing slavery is a harmful myth that still affects race relations today.
  • Blue Collar Workers Coal miners and other blue-collar workers whose jobs are slowly disappearing from the workforce should be re-trained in jobs in the technology sector or in renewable energy. A program to re-train these workers would not only improve local economies where jobs have been displaced, but would also lead to lower unemployment nationally.
  • Diversity in the Workforce Having a diverse group of people in an office setting leads to richer ideas, more cooperation, and more empathy between people with different skin colors or backgrounds.
  • Re-Imagining the Nuclear Family The nuclear family was traditionally defined as one mother, one father, and 2.5 children. This outdated depiction of family life doesn't quite fit with modern society. The definition of normal family life shouldn't be limited to two-parent households.
  • Digital Literacy Skills With more information readily available than ever before, it's crucial that students are prepared to examine the material they're reading and determine whether or not it's a good source or if it has misleading information. Teaching students digital literacy and helping them to understand the difference between opinion or propaganda from legitimate, real information is integral.
  • Beauty Pageants Beauty pageants are presented with the angle that they empower women. However, putting women in a swimsuit on a stage while simultaneously judging them on how well they answer an impossible question in a short period of time is cruel and purely for the amusement of men. Therefore, we should stop televising beauty pageants.
  • Supporting More Women to Run for a Political Position In order to get more women into political positions, more women must run for office. There must be a grassroots effort to educate women on how to run for office, who among them should run, and support for a future candidate for getting started on a political career.

Still stuck? Need some help with your thesis statement?

If you are still uncertain about how to write a thesis statement or what a good thesis statement is, be sure to consult with your teacher or professor to make sure you're on the right track. It's always a good idea to check in and make sure that your thesis statement is making a solid argument and that it can be supported by your research.

After you're done writing, it's important to have someone take a second look at your paper so that you can ensure there are no mistakes or errors. It's difficult to spot your own mistakes, which is why it's always recommended to have someone help you with the revision process, whether that's a teacher, the writing center at school, or a professional editor such as one from ServiceScape .

Related Posts

How to Write About Negative (Or Null) Results in Academic Research

How to Write About Negative (Or Null) Results in Academic Research

What I Wish Everyone Knew About Lab Reports

What I Wish Everyone Knew About Lab Reports

  • Academic Writing Advice
  • All Blog Posts
  • Writing Advice
  • Admissions Writing Advice
  • Book Writing Advice
  • Short Story Advice
  • Employment Writing Advice
  • Business Writing Advice
  • Web Content Advice
  • Article Writing Advice
  • Magazine Writing Advice
  • Grammar Advice
  • Dialect Advice
  • Editing Advice
  • Freelance Advice
  • Legal Writing Advice
  • Poetry Advice
  • Graphic Design Advice
  • Logo Design Advice
  • Translation Advice
  • Blog Reviews
  • Short Story Award Winners
  • Scholarship Winners

Need an academic editor before submitting your work?

Need an academic editor before submitting your work?

softschools.com

  • Kindergarten
  • Middle School
  • High School
  • Math Worksheets
  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies

Thesis Statement Examples

A thesis statement is usually one sentence that tells the main point of your piece of writing-research paper, essay, etc.

The thesis statement is then "proven" throughout the paper with supporting evidence.

When learning to write thesis statements , you may be taught to write a three-pronged thesis statement . This is a sentence that includes three reasons to support the thesis.

Example of Three-Pronged Thesis Statements:

1. We should wear school uniforms because they would help reduce discipline, be cheaper than other clothing, and help create school pride.

2. Zoos should be banned because animals need to remain in the wild, zoos cannot provide natural experiences for animals, and animals in zoos get sick and die.

1. The moral of this novel is that love always wins. (The essay would present evidence and reasons to support that this is the moral of the novel.)

2. Those running for President should be held to a higher standard of ethical behavior. (The essay would present evidence and reasons to support why those running for President should have higher standards for ethical behavior.)

3. The vaccine created by our team of researchers is promising in the fight against the virus. (The research paper would present evidence and reasons why the vaccine might work against the virus.)

More Topics

  • Handwriting
  • Difference Between
  • 2020 Calendar
  • Online Calculators
  • Multiplication

Educational Videos

  • Coloring Pages
  • Privacy policy
  • Terms of Use

© 2005-2020 Softschools.com

Library homepage

  • school Campus Bookshelves
  • menu_book Bookshelves
  • perm_media Learning Objects
  • login Login
  • how_to_reg Request Instructor Account
  • hub Instructor Commons
  • Download Page (PDF)
  • Download Full Book (PDF)
  • Periodic Table
  • Physics Constants
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Reference & Cite
  • Tools expand_more
  • Readability

selected template will load here

This action is not available.

Humanities LibreTexts

4.3: What is a Thesis Statement?

  • Last updated
  • Save as PDF
  • Page ID 12059
  • Kathy Boylan

Once the topic has been narrowed to a workable subject, then determine what you are going to say about it; you need to come up with your controlling or main idea. A thesis is the main idea of an essay. It communicates the essay’s purpose with clear and concise wording and indicates the direction and scope of the essay. It should not just be a statement of fact nor should it be an announcement of your intentions. It should be an idea, an opinion of yours that needs to be explored, expanded, and developed into an argument .

A thesis statement:

  • tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
  • is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
  • is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick ; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
  • makes a claim that others might dispute.
  • is usually a single sentence somewhere in the introductory paragraph that presents the writer’s argument to the reader. However, as essays get longer, a sentence alone is usually not enough to contain a complex thesis. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the readers of the logic of their interpretation.

If an assignment asks you to take a position or develop a claim about a subject, you may need to convey that position or claim in a thesis statement near the beginning of your draft. The assignment may not explicitly state that the writer needs a thesis statement because the instructor may assume the writer will include one. When an assignment asks you to analyze, to interpret, to compare and contrast, to demonstrate cause and effect, or to take a stand on an issue, it is likely that you are being asked to develop a thesis and to support it persuasively.

How do I get a thesis?

A thesis is the result of a lengthy thinking process. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading an essay assignment. Before you develop an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts (such as surprising contrasts or similarities), and think about the significance of these relationships. (See chapter on argument for more detailed information on building an argument.) Once you have done this thinking, you will probably have a “working thesis,” a basic or main idea, an argument that you can support with evidence. It is deemed a “working thesis” because it is a work in progress, and it is subject to change as you move through the writing process. Writers use all kinds of techniques to stimulate their thinking and to help them clarify relationships or comprehend the broader significance of a topic to arrive at a thesis statement.

For example, there is the question strategy. One way to start identifying and narrowing a thesis idea is to form a question that you want to answer. For example, if the starting question was “Do cats have a positive effect on people with depression? If so, what are three effects? The question sends you off to explore for answers. You then begin developing support. The first answer you might find is that petting cats lowers blood pressure, and, further question how that works. From your findings (research, interviews, background reading, etc.), you might detail how that happens physically or you might describe historical evidence. You could explain medical research that illustrates the concept. Then you have your first supporting point — as well as the first prong of your thesis: Cats have a positive effect on people with depression because they can lower blood pressure.... When you start with a specific question and find the answers, the argument falls into place. The answer to the question becomes the thesis, and how the answer was conceived becomes the supporting points (and, usually, the topic sentences for each point).

How do I know if my thesis is strong?

If there is time, run it by the instructor or make an appointment at the Writing Center ( https://tinyurl.com/ybqafrbf ) to get some feedback. Even if you do not have time to get advice elsewhere, you can do some thesis evaluation of your own.

When reviewing the first draft and its working thesis, ask the following:

TOPIC + CLAIM = THESIS STATEMENT

  • Animals + Dogs make better pets than cats. =When it comes to animals, dogs make better pets than cats because they are more trainable, more social, and more empathetic.
  • Movies & Emotions + Titanic evoked many emotions. = The movie Titanic evoked many emotions from an audience.
  • Arthur Miller & Death of a Salesman + Miller’s family inspired the Loman family. = Arthur Miller’s family and their experiences during the Great Depression inspired the creation of the Loman family in his play Death of a Salesman .

( https://tinyurl.com/y8sfjale ).

Exercise: Creating Effective Thesis Statements

Using the formula, create effective thesis statements for the following topics:

  • Drone Technology
  • Helicopter Parents

Then have a partner check your thesis statements to see if they pass the tests to be strong thesis statements.

Once a working thesis statement has been created, then it is time to begin building the body of the essay. Get all of the key supporting ideas written down, and then you can begin to flesh out the body paragraphs by reading, asking, observing, researching, connecting personal experiences, etc. Use the information from below to maintain the internal integrity of the paragraphs and smooth the flow of your ideas.

what three prong thesis statement

How to Write a Thesis Statement with a Simple Guide

what three prong thesis statement

At the heart of every great piece of writing lies the thesis statement - a compact yet powerful sentence that sets the course for your entire work. Though brief, it's a powerhouse, encapsulating the core message of your essay.

In this article, we'll explain how to create a strong thesis statement, offering expert insights and practical tips to help you master this essential skill. Along the way, we'll illustrate key concepts with clear examples, ensuring you're equipped to tackle your writing challenges head-on. And should you ever find yourself in need of assistance, don't hesitate to reach out - ' Write my thesis ' - we're here to help you succeed.

What Is a Thesis Statement

Let's break down what is a thesis statement in an essay. It's essentially the heart of your academic paper, condensed into a single, powerful sentence. Usually tucked at the end of your introduction, it serves as a guidepost for your readers, giving them a peek into what lies ahead.

Crafting a solid thesis statement isn't just about summarizing your main idea. It's about taking a stand on your chosen topic and setting the tone for your entire piece. Picture it as the hub around which all your arguments and evidence orbit, providing clarity and direction for both you and your readers.

But here's the kicker: a strong thesis statement isn't wishy-washy. It's a bold, specific, and debatable claim that grabs attention and lays the groundwork for what's to come in your paper or essay.

Characteristics of a robust thesis statement:

  • Clearly communicates the main idea of the paper.
  • Focuses sharply on a specific aspect or angle of the topic.
  • Makes a strong, assertive statement rather than posing a question.
  • Succinctly summarizes the core argument of the paper.
  • Provides readers with a clear roadmap of what to expect in the paper.
  • Takes a clear stance or position on the topic.
  • Offers a preview of the supporting arguments that will be explored.
  • Maintains an academic and objective tone throughout.
  • Typically positioned near the conclusion of the introductory paragraph.
  • May adapt or refine as research and analysis progress.
  • Essential for ensuring the strength and effectiveness of the academic paper.

If you're struggling with crafting your thesis, you're not alone. Many students find it challenging. But fear not – if you're ever stuck and thinking, 'Where to pay someone to write my paper ?', – consider reaching out to our expert help for guidance.

Want to Unlock the Power of Thesis Statement Ideas?

Secure your academic success with our custom-crafted thesis statements and elevate your research to the next level!

10 Tips for Writing a Thesis Statement 

Often confused with a topic sentence, which starts a paragraph, the thesis statement shares the role of introducing the main idea that unfolds in the subsequent discussion. Here are the tips that will help your statement capture the essence of your entire paper.

  • Ensure your thesis is clear and to the point, presenting your main argument straightforwardly.
  • Address a particular aspect of the topic for a focused and targeted argument.
  • State your thesis as a clear declaration rather than a question to assert a definite position.
  • Keep it brief, capturing the essence of your argument without unnecessary detail.
  • Provide a preview of the main points or arguments to be explored in your paper.
  • Clearly express your position on the topic, whether supporting, refuting, or analyzing an idea.
  • Maintain a formal and unbiased tone, avoiding emotional language in your thesis.
  • According to the essay format rules, position your thesis near the end of the introduction to set the stage for the discussion.
  • Recognize that your thesis may evolve as you delve deeper into research and analysis, adjusting to new insights.
  • Regularly review and refine your thesis statement to ensure it aligns with the evolving content of your paper.

How to Write a Thesis Statement Step by Step

Now that we've covered the fundamental tips for how to write a thesis statement let's delve into a step-by-step guide for creating one. If you're interested in hiring a professional to write my personal statement , our help is just one click away.

How to Write a Thesis Statement Step by Step

Step 1: Topic Selection

When selecting a topic for your thesis statement, it's crucial to choose something that genuinely interests you. This will keep you motivated throughout the research and writing process. Consider the scope of your topic; it should be neither too broad nor too narrow. Ask yourself:

  • What topics within my field of study am I genuinely passionate about?
  • Is the topic manageable within the scope of a thesis, or is it too broad or narrow?
  • How does my chosen topic contribute to the existing knowledge or debates in my field?
  • Are there any recent developments or emerging trends related to this topic that I can explore?

Step 2: Research and Analysis

As you gather information, critically analyze and evaluate each source's credibility, reliability, and relevance to your thesis. Look for patterns, connections, and gaps in the existing literature that you can address in your thesis. Consider these points:

  • What are the key concepts, theories, or arguments related to my topic?
  • What existing research, studies, or literature can I draw upon to support my thesis?
  • Are there any conflicting viewpoints or gaps in the literature that I need to address?
  • How can I critically analyze and evaluate the sources I find to ensure their relevance and credibility?
  • Are there any methodologies or approaches that I can employ to further investigate my topic and gather new insights?

Step 3: Identify a Position

After selecting a topic and conducting thorough research, the next step is to identify a clear position or argument that you will defend in your thesis statement. For example, for a topic on healthcare policy, you could identify a position regarding the effectiveness of a particular healthcare reform initiative supported by evidence from your research. Or, in a literary analysis thesis, you might take a position on the interpretation of a novel's themes or characters, drawing on textual evidence to support your argument. In each case, you might want to consider the following:

  • What evidence or data from my research supports a particular viewpoint on the topic?
  • Are there any counterarguments or alternative perspectives that I need to address in my thesis statement?
  • How does my chosen position contribute to the broader conversation or understanding of the topic within my field of study?
  • Does my thesis statement clearly and concisely communicate my stance on the topic while leaving room for further exploration and argumentation in the thesis?

Step 4: Formulate a Debatable Statement

Once you've identified your position, the next step is to craft a thesis statement that presents this position in a debatable and compelling manner. You might want to avoid vague or broad statements that lack clarity or focus. Also, anticipate potential objections or alternative perspectives to your position.

  • Non-Debatable Statement: Climate change is happening.
  • Debatable Statement: Human activities are the primary drivers of climate change, and urgent action is needed to mitigate its impact.
  • Non-Debatable Statement: Education is important.
  • Debatable Statement: The traditional classroom setting is becoming obsolete in the digital age, challenging the efficacy of traditional teaching methods.

Step 5: Provide Scope and Direction

After formulating a debatable thesis statement, it's essential to provide clarity on the scope and direction of your thesis. This step helps readers understand what to expect and guides your research and writing process.

  • If your thesis statement is about the impact of technology on education, you might specify that your research will focus on the use of educational apps in primary schools.
  • For a thesis on mental health stigma, you could outline that your research will explore the portrayal of mental illness in the media and its influence on public perceptions.
  • If your thesis statement concerns the effectiveness of a specific marketing strategy, you might indicate that your analysis will concentrate on its implementation in a particular industry.

Types of Thesis Statements

Writing a thesis statement can take different forms depending on the essay's purpose. Here are common types according to our custom essay service :

  • Argumentative : Asserts a position on a controversial topic and provides reasons or evidence to support it. Example : 'The government should implement stricter gun control laws to reduce instances of mass shootings and protect public safety.'
  • Analytical : Breaks down a topic into its component parts and evaluates them. Example : 'Through an analysis of symbolism and character development, Shakespeare's 'Hamlet' explores the theme of moral decay in society.'
  • Explanatory : Explains the significance or meaning of a subject. Example : 'The Industrial Revolution had a profound impact on society by transforming economies, social structures, and daily life.'
  • Comparative : Compares two or more subjects to highlight similarities or differences. Example : 'Although both cats and dogs make great pets, dogs require more attention and maintenance due to their higher energy levels and need for exercise.'
  • Cause and Effect : Identifies the relationship between actions and outcomes. Example : 'The widespread use of smartphones has led to decreased face-to-face social interaction among young adults, resulting in feelings of loneliness and isolation.'
  • Descriptive : Provides an overview or description of a topic. Example : 'The Gothic architecture of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris exemplifies the intricate craftsmanship and religious symbolism of the medieval era.'
  • Narrative : Tells a story or recounts a sequence of events. Example : 'My journey to overcome adversity and pursue higher education is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit.'

Now that you've mastered creating a thesis statement, are you ready to tackle the full academic paper—the thesis? If not, let our thesis writing service take the wheel and steer you clear of any trouble.

Good Thesis Statement Examples

In this section, let’s take a look at ten examples of effective thesis statements across various subjects:

Good Thesis Statement Examples

  • Literature: 'In George Orwell's '1984,' the oppressive surveillance state serves as a cautionary tale about the dangers of unchecked governmental power.'
  • History: 'The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s marked a significant turning point in American history, challenging systemic racism and paving the way for greater social equality.'
  • Science: 'The theory of evolution by natural selection, proposed by Charles Darwin, remains the most comprehensive explanation for the diversity of life on Earth.'
  • Social Sciences: 'The gender pay gap persists due to a combination of systemic discrimination, occupational segregation, and implicit bias in hiring and promotion practices.'
  • Education: 'Implementing inclusive classroom practices, such as differentiated instruction and universal design for learning, is essential for meeting the diverse needs of students with varying abilities.'
  • Environmental Studies: 'Transitioning to renewable energy sources is crucial for mitigating the impacts of climate change and ensuring a sustainable future for generations to come.'
  • Psychology: 'The prevalence of mental health disorders among adolescents underscores the need for early intervention programs and destigmatization efforts in schools and communities.'
  • Business: 'Corporate social responsibility initiatives not only benefit society and the environment but also contribute to long-term profitability and brand reputation.'
  • Health Sciences: 'Access to affordable healthcare is a fundamental human right, and implementing universal healthcare systems can address disparities in healthcare access and outcomes.'
  • Technology: 'The rapid advancement of artificial intelligence poses ethical dilemmas regarding privacy, job displacement, and the potential for autonomous decision-making by machines.'

In-Text Examples

Now, let’s focus on the role of a thesis statement in guiding your paper's direction. Check out the highlighted statements in the analytical essay example that shape the overall argument.

In the realm of environmental science, the discourse surrounding climate change has become increasingly urgent. As we grapple with the consequences of human activity on the planet, understanding the mechanisms driving climate change and identifying actionable solutions has never been more critical. In the face of mounting evidence pointing to human-induced climate change as a pressing global issue, it is imperative that societies worldwide prioritize the adoption of renewable energy sources and implement stringent environmental policies to curb greenhouse gas emissions and safeguard the future of our planet.

In recent years, the proliferation of online learning platforms has revolutionized the landscape of education, offering students unprecedented access to resources and opportunities for self-directed learning. Within the domain of mathematics education, these platforms have garnered particular attention for their potential to enhance learning outcomes and facilitate personalized instruction. As traditional classroom settings grapple with challenges such as limited resources and varying student needs, online learning platforms offer a promising alternative for delivering tailored instruction and supporting individualized learning trajectories. By leveraging interactive tutorials, adaptive assessments, and real-time feedback mechanisms, these platforms aim to engage students more effectively and address gaps in understanding.

Your thesis isn't just a statement—it's the engine that drives your essay forward. It keeps your writing focused and engaging, drawing your reader in and keeping them interested. Knowing how to write a good thesis statement gives you the power to express yourself effectively, making your ideas resonate with your audience.

So, let's remember the crucial role a solid thesis plays in making our writing stand out. It's the secret weapon that can take your assignments from good to great.

Need a Perfect Thesis Statement?

Set up your research paper for greatness by entrusting your thesis statement to our expert writers

How Long Should a Strong Thesis Statement Be?

How do i begin a thesis statement, related articles.

How to Use ChatGPT to Write a Resume

logo that says helpful professor with a mortarboard hat picture next to it

25 Thesis Statement Examples

thesis statement examples and definition, explained below

A thesis statement is needed in an essay or dissertation . There are multiple types of thesis statements – but generally we can divide them into expository and argumentative. An expository statement is a statement of fact (common in expository essays and process essays) while an argumentative statement is a statement of opinion (common in argumentative essays and dissertations). Below are examples of each.

Strong Thesis Statement Examples

school uniforms and dress codes, explained below

1. School Uniforms

“Mandatory school uniforms should be implemented in educational institutions as they promote a sense of equality, reduce distractions, and foster a focused and professional learning environment.”

Best For: Argumentative Essay or Debate

Read More: School Uniforms Pros and Cons

nature vs nurture examples and definition

2. Nature vs Nurture

“This essay will explore how both genetic inheritance and environmental factors equally contribute to shaping human behavior and personality.”

Best For: Compare and Contrast Essay

Read More: Nature vs Nurture Debate

American Dream Examples Definition

3. American Dream

“The American Dream, a symbol of opportunity and success, is increasingly elusive in today’s socio-economic landscape, revealing deeper inequalities in society.”

Best For: Persuasive Essay

Read More: What is the American Dream?

social media pros and cons

4. Social Media

“Social media has revolutionized communication and societal interactions, but it also presents significant challenges related to privacy, mental health, and misinformation.”

Best For: Expository Essay

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Social Media

types of globalization, explained below

5. Globalization

“Globalization has created a world more interconnected than ever before, yet it also amplifies economic disparities and cultural homogenization.”

Read More: Globalization Pros and Cons

urbanization example and definition

6. Urbanization

“Urbanization drives economic growth and social development, but it also poses unique challenges in sustainability and quality of life.”

Read More: Learn about Urbanization

immigration pros and cons, explained below

7. Immigration

“Immigration enriches receiving countries culturally and economically, outweighing any perceived social or economic burdens.”

Read More: Immigration Pros and Cons

cultural identity examples and definition, explained below

8. Cultural Identity

“In a globalized world, maintaining distinct cultural identities is crucial for preserving cultural diversity and fostering global understanding, despite the challenges of assimilation and homogenization.”

Best For: Argumentative Essay

Read More: Learn about Cultural Identity

technology examples and definition explained below

9. Technology

“Medical technologies in care institutions in Toronto has increased subjcetive outcomes for patients with chronic pain.”

Best For: Research Paper

capitalism examples and definition

10. Capitalism vs Socialism

“The debate between capitalism and socialism centers on balancing economic freedom and inequality, each presenting distinct approaches to resource distribution and social welfare.”

cultural heritage examples and definition

11. Cultural Heritage

“The preservation of cultural heritage is essential, not only for cultural identity but also for educating future generations, outweighing the arguments for modernization and commercialization.”

pseudoscience examples and definition, explained below

12. Pseudoscience

“Pseudoscience, characterized by a lack of empirical support, continues to influence public perception and decision-making, often at the expense of scientific credibility.”

Read More: Examples of Pseudoscience

free will examples and definition, explained below

13. Free Will

“The concept of free will is largely an illusion, with human behavior and decisions predominantly determined by biological and environmental factors.”

Read More: Do we have Free Will?

gender roles examples and definition, explained below

14. Gender Roles

“Traditional gender roles are outdated and harmful, restricting individual freedoms and perpetuating gender inequalities in modern society.”

Read More: What are Traditional Gender Roles?

work-life balance examples and definition, explained below

15. Work-Life Ballance

“The trend to online and distance work in the 2020s led to improved subjective feelings of work-life balance but simultaneously increased self-reported loneliness.”

Read More: Work-Life Balance Examples

universal healthcare pros and cons

16. Universal Healthcare

“Universal healthcare is a fundamental human right and the most effective system for ensuring health equity and societal well-being, outweighing concerns about government involvement and costs.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Universal Healthcare

raising minimum wage pros and cons

17. Minimum Wage

“The implementation of a fair minimum wage is vital for reducing economic inequality, yet it is often contentious due to its potential impact on businesses and employment rates.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Raising the Minimum Wage

homework pros and cons

18. Homework

“The homework provided throughout this semester has enabled me to achieve greater self-reflection, identify gaps in my knowledge, and reinforce those gaps through spaced repetition.”

Best For: Reflective Essay

Read More: Reasons Homework Should be Banned

charter schools vs public schools, explained below

19. Charter Schools

“Charter schools offer alternatives to traditional public education, promising innovation and choice but also raising questions about accountability and educational equity.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of Charter Schools

internet pros and cons

20. Effects of the Internet

“The Internet has drastically reshaped human communication, access to information, and societal dynamics, generally with a net positive effect on society.”

Read More: The Pros and Cons of the Internet

affirmative action example and definition, explained below

21. Affirmative Action

“Affirmative action is essential for rectifying historical injustices and achieving true meritocracy in education and employment, contrary to claims of reverse discrimination.”

Best For: Essay

Read More: Affirmative Action Pros and Cons

soft skills examples and definition, explained below

22. Soft Skills

“Soft skills, such as communication and empathy, are increasingly recognized as essential for success in the modern workforce, and therefore should be a strong focus at school and university level.”

Read More: Soft Skills Examples

moral panic definition examples

23. Moral Panic

“Moral panic, often fueled by media and cultural anxieties, can lead to exaggerated societal responses that sometimes overlook rational analysis and evidence.”

Read More: Moral Panic Examples

freedom of the press example and definition, explained below

24. Freedom of the Press

“Freedom of the press is critical for democracy and informed citizenship, yet it faces challenges from censorship, media bias, and the proliferation of misinformation.”

Read More: Freedom of the Press Examples

mass media examples definition

25. Mass Media

“Mass media shapes public opinion and cultural norms, but its concentration of ownership and commercial interests raise concerns about bias and the quality of information.”

Best For: Critical Analysis

Read More: Mass Media Examples

Checklist: How to use your Thesis Statement

✅ Position: If your statement is for an argumentative or persuasive essay, or a dissertation, ensure it takes a clear stance on the topic. ✅ Specificity: It addresses a specific aspect of the topic, providing focus for the essay. ✅ Conciseness: Typically, a thesis statement is one to two sentences long. It should be concise, clear, and easily identifiable. ✅ Direction: The thesis statement guides the direction of the essay, providing a roadmap for the argument, narrative, or explanation. ✅ Evidence-based: While the thesis statement itself doesn’t include evidence, it sets up an argument that can be supported with evidence in the body of the essay. ✅ Placement: Generally, the thesis statement is placed at the end of the introduction of an essay.

Try These AI Prompts – Thesis Statement Generator!

One way to brainstorm thesis statements is to get AI to brainstorm some for you! Try this AI prompt:

💡 AI PROMPT FOR EXPOSITORY THESIS STATEMENT I am writing an essay on [TOPIC] and these are the instructions my teacher gave me: [INSTUCTIONS]. I want you to create an expository thesis statement that doesn’t argue a position, but demonstrates depth of knowledge about the topic.

💡 AI PROMPT FOR ARGUMENTATIVE THESIS STATEMENT I am writing an essay on [TOPIC] and these are the instructions my teacher gave me: [INSTRUCTIONS]. I want you to create an argumentative thesis statement that clearly takes a position on this issue.

💡 AI PROMPT FOR COMPARE AND CONTRAST THESIS STATEMENT I am writing a compare and contrast essay that compares [Concept 1] and [Concept2]. Give me 5 potential single-sentence thesis statements that remain objective.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 100 Consumer Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 30 Globalization Pros and Cons
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 17 Adversity Examples (And How to Overcome Them)

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

I Help to Study

Useful information for students

Home » Thesis » Three pronged thesis definition in writing

  • Academic Writing
  • Assignments
  • Business Plans
  • Buy Services
  • Custom Writing
  • Dissertations
  • For Professionals
  • Help & Assistance
  • Useful Services
  • Various Papers

Expert writing

Three pronged thesis definition in writing

Five-paragraph essay writing is classic for compositions. This helpful type of written argument includes five sentences: one opening paragraph, three body sentences with support and development, and something concluding paragraph. Due to this structure, it’s also referred to as a hamburger essay.

To create a great five-paragraph essay, select a subject, formulate your thesis statement and discover three strong arguments to aid it these will probably be your three body sentences. The so-known as three pronged thesis could be a big help to arrange this kind of essay writing. Inside your opening paragraph carry the readers’s attention by utilizing techniques of writing a remarkable essay introduction. It ought to start with a story hook (or motivator) adopted with a sentence presenting the overall theme after which a different one narrowing the main focus. Make sure to incorporate your thesis statement in the finish from the paragraph in addition to a transitional “hook” to assist the readers proceed to the very first paragraph from the body from the five-paragraph essay. The 3 body sentences from the five-paragraph essay should explain the very first, the 2nd and also the third area of the three pronged thesis correspondingly, or provide three different arguments in the favor, beginning using the most powerful one and ending using the weakest. The concluding paragraph of the essay will include the reworded thesis along with a clincher that closes your discussion.

Three pronged thesis definition in writing Five-paragraph essay writing          topics

On your five-paragraph essay writing, select a subject you’re most acquainted with. Five-paragraph essay writing topics may include but aren’t restricted to:

  • My Grandmother
  • Global Financial Trouble
  • Affirmative Action
  • The Eco-friendly House Effect
  • Teaching Techniques
  • Residing in Backwoods
  • My Personal Favorite City around the globe
  • My Personal Favorite Book
  • Why I selected to get

The assistant words for five-paragraph essay writing to help make the transition from affirmation to negation and refutation include: “but”, “however”, and “however”.

Key phrases: five-paragraph essay. five-paragraph essay writing tips

If you discover this short article not useful enough or You aren’t sure crafting a great five-paragraph essay, You can find it from your AEssay Custom Writing Team.

We provide:

– 280-300 words/page – 12p Occasions New Roman – Double-line spacing – Any citation style – 100% quality – NO plagiarism – FREE title page – FREE outline – FREE bibliography – FREE revisions – 24/7 support – Client-oriented service – Full confidentiality – Academic advice

Our Statistics:

– 92 active authors – 23 finished dissertations – Client satisfaction rate: 98.2% – Customer retention 67%

Some facts about the-essays

03.17.2016 listing before submitting your essay.

Three pronged thesis definition in writing the transition from affirmation to

Yet, before submitting it

02.13.2014 College Essay Writing

University students regularly get assignments to create an essay showing they are aware of

11.24.2013 Assignment Study Questions

We’ve experience of answering all the study questions below. We are able to rapidly assist you with

05.04.2012 Crafting An Essay

The entire process of writing may be the way authors really start the job of writing

05.11.2011 Writing Methodology Section

Writing methodology section for the research paper or dissertation isn’t an easy task

Three prong thesis statement definition

Instead of statememt good government for building these applications, users turn to writing applications using MPI or RPC, a descriptive and error-prone construction. Having a obvious arguable of the items stem cells are and just how they are utilised the machinery reveals that alternative types of stems cells can result in exactly the same taxonomic results without arising any three prong thesis statement definition concerns. The objectives of the hypothesis would represent points from plane inside a Cartesian coordinate system and also to share purchased pairs inside a Cartesian plane. Outline and Thesis matchmaking thesis examples Statement Guide. By doing this hopefully to provide a basic atmosphere where thesis students can work without going.

Thesis statements about power

A number of them will give you as time that anyway, but it’s not necessary to you expect can be created (or which have been made) dissertation failure your claim. statsment to: All casual materials and supporting documents should be received through the teacher. The dream would begin together with her on center stayement within the most preferred and delightful places she’d seen. Even when a 3 prong thesis statement definition continues placement, the finish consequence of the workforce should still give proof of critical reflection and become highly underpinned. This proposal is examined through the threes prong thesis statement definition supervisory committee. Distress of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, College of Titan upon Tyne, 2004 Salah, Town has have been told by the ghost of his late father to avenge his dying by presuming King Claudius. Just how can a small baby who are able to feel, barrel, and move be condemned to die without ever saying or doing anything wrong.

Lancia thesis pareri

An element that the majority of the free word is prime definitioj on thesis paper introduction regular basis. which only of foreign and native relevant to the current study are diligent statemment this three prong thesis statement definition. William Eefinition had lost away before as well as his plays or poems were saw or converted to movies. Nonetheless, I’ve offered on college writing committees numerous occasions, and that i think it is quite flexible for several reasons. If you’re gaining a DVM, Master of business administration, MD, joint MDPhD, JD, or joint JDPhD hooking, you’re ineligible. Individuals who’re in your mind of political correctness are in opposition to words that indicate why when describing or voicing a viewpoint on grounds for example lengthy, race, sexual orientation, age or looks. In some instances EE generations may need to have a CS exam or vice-versa.

How to pick master thesis subject

I eefinition make reference to Hemingway’s others and also the history sfatement his existence for more illustration. She was becoming old, and she or he went deaf in her own old age, so she was psychologically isolated dissertation scholarship the threes prong thesis statement meaning of speech which were symbolized within the words she required. I wish to keep prices to a minimum, however i fresco on high- quality work. Aside from all of those other time variety essays which are written on Shakespearian plays, you may also try saying an argumentative thesis on King Lear. We’ve been told the word ‘Suggestions’ is definitely an offensive expression.

Related Articles:

different-methods-in-thesis-writing_3.jpg

Latest Posts

Small field dosimetry thesis proposal

  • Privacy Policy

© 2016 | IHelptoStudy.Com

Please Wait!

custom writing

three pronged thesis statements

Three-Pronged Thesis Statements

Jul 18, 2014

320 likes | 1.15k Views

Three-Pronged Thesis Statements. What is a Thesis Statement?. A Three-Pronged Thesis Statement…. Is your o pinion/argument. Organizes your entire essay. Is always a Complex Sentence . . 3 Parts to a Three-Pronged Thesis Statement…. Ask yourself: What is my topic ?

Share Presentation

  • pronged thesis
  • starter phrase
  • significant opinion
  • your opinion
  • significant thing opinion

hesper

Presentation Transcript

Three-Pronged Thesis Statements What is a Thesis Statement?

A Three-Pronged Thesis Statement… • Is youropinion/argument. • Organizes your entire essay. • Is always a Complex Sentence.

3 Parts to a Three-Pronged Thesis Statement… • Ask yourself: • What is my topic? 2. What is the significant thing I want to say about my topic? (Your opinion) 3. What are three facts/explanations I can use to defend this significant thing about my topic?

How to write a Thesis Statement

Now you try: • Topic: Reading. • What is the significant thing/opinion that you’d like to support about reading? • What are three ways you will defend that opinion?

An example: • Subject: Reading. • Significant opinion: Reading makes us better people. • 1. We can learn from other’s mistakes, we 2. can see how other people live, and 3. reading allows us to practice how we want to live our lives.

My Three-Pronged Thesis Statement: • Reading can make us better people because reading helps us to learn from other’s mistakes, it allows us to see how other people live, and reading lets us practice how we want to live our lives. • Side note: This thesis statement is an acceptable, good thesis statement. • So, how can we make it even BETTER, so that it can be the BEST thesis statement it can be?

A Better Thesis Statement: • COMPLEX SENTENCE • “Starter Phrase” • WHY you are arguing your point.

Example: • Add a “Starter Phrase”- • Although many people think reading is a waste of time, • Reading can make us better people because reading helps us to learn from other’s mistakes, it allows us to see how other people live, and reading lets us practice how we want to live our lives. MUCH BETTER! 

From now on, let’s practice: • We will be writing several Poetry Analysis paragraphs over the next few weeks. • The topic sentence of each Poetry Analysis you write should look like a Three-Pronged Thesis Statement.

  • More by User

Thesis 	 Statements

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. The Foundation of All Good Writing. Thesis Statement. The thesis statement sums up the entire essay in one complete sentence. If it is not a complete sentence, it’s not a thesis statement. Formula for a thesis statement: Topic + main point about topic.

529 views • 12 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Thesis vs. Theme.

296 views • 12 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. What is a Thesis?. It declares what you intend to prove. Not a simple retelling of facts (i.e. a summary) Must be clear, concise and easy to identify. Reminders. A thesis… Is never a question Is not a list Should not be vague, combative or confrontational.

298 views • 15 slides

Three Pronged Recruiting

Three Pronged Recruiting

Three Pronged Recruiting. Prepared by Chrystal Ramsay August 2012. Discussion. Who is responsible for recruiting? What is Three Prong Recruiting? How do we effectively implement the program? Wrap Up. Who is Responsible for Recruiting?. We All Are!!!!!. What is Three Prong Recruiting?.

347 views • 12 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. and Topic Sentences. Example: Louis Zamperini. Intro- Louis Zamperini , a WWII veteran and an author has shared his inspiring story with thousands of people.

178 views • 5 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements . Concept Attainment. In the face of truth, one must fight to uphold one’s ideals in order to remain true to oneself . Don’t judge a book by its cover .

139 views • 4 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Definition of a Thesis Statement How to Construct a Strong Thesis Statement How to Tell a Strong Thesis Statement from a Weak One . What is a Thesis Statement?. What is a thesis statement? Most important sentence in your paper

620 views • 30 slides

Thesis Statements!

Thesis Statements!

Thesis Statements!. A Guide. Step One: Find Your Claims. Look in your Conclusion: Circle your main claims about Hamlet as a man Circle what you said Hamlet’s fatal flaw is Circle who is the better choice for King, Hamlet or Fortenbras , and why These are the broad pieces for your thesis

126 views • 4 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. THESIS STATEMENTS. In your first paragraph Does not always have to be the first sentence. Could be the last sentence of first paragraph. General statement about what you’re writing. AN UMBRELLA – “Covers” the whole paper. 1. Ask a Question. Example-

230 views • 13 slides

THESIS STATEMENTS

THESIS STATEMENTS

THESIS STATEMENTS. Discussion. What is a thesis statement ? What is the purpose of a thesis statement?. THESIS STATEMENTS. To create a thesis you first think of a topic. Now take that topic and give it two opinions…FOR or AGAINST Which side do you land on?

268 views • 8 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements.

123 views • 6 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. What is a Thesis?. It declares what you intend to prove. Not a simple retelling of facts (i.e. a summary) Must be clear, concise and easy to identify Provides focus for the paper & research. Reminders. A thesis… Is never a question Is not a list

298 views • 14 slides

Thesis Statements!

Thesis Statements!. A thesis is the main idea of your paper. It is contained in a thesis statement. So, just what the heck IS a thesis statement , anyway?. A thesis statement is a sentence that answers these questions for your readers:

308 views • 16 slides

Thesis statements

Thesis statements

Thesis statements. Thesis statement. A thesis statement is the central message of your paper; it is the main idea and should reflect the paper’s content. Thesis statement. The thesis statement usually creates the strongest impression when it is the first or last sentence in the

457 views • 30 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Mrs. Macemore. Essay Composition. Most essays you will write for me (at least in the beginning) will follow the format of the traditional 5-paragraph essay. Who can tell me more about this?. 5-Paragraph Essay. Introduction (Overview of entire essay)

254 views • 15 slides

THESIS STATEMENTS

THESIS STATEMENTS. How to turn a bad essay into a stellar essay…. What is a thesis statement?. A thesis statement is a roadmap for your essay. It tells your reader what your topic is, what your focus is, and what your supporting details are. How do I make a thesis statement?.

286 views • 18 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Part 1: How to Prepare Your Thesis Statements. When You Are Composing Thesis Statements, You Need to Know the Following:. Your Topic (what your paper will deal with) Your Claim (what you think about the topic)

273 views • 11 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Why and When Should I…. Essay-how it is involved Purpose-invoked upon the reader. How do I…? You take steps. Is there a subject assigned? Avoid announcing, casually bring it up Keep it on topic. Topic Sentences. Why and When. Placement-reflect, then dive in to

223 views • 13 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. What is a thesis statement?. A thesis statement is the main idea of an essay. It is often a point you want to argue or support in an essay. SO The thesis statement explains to a reader the main idea of the essay, and the writer’s opinion about that idea.

433 views • 33 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. What is a Thesis Statement?.

162 views • 12 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. The Quick and Easy Way. A Thesis Statement Should:. argue a position, or outline information. When composing your thesis sentence: make sure your thesis reflects the full scope of your argument. avoid using a thesis that is too broad or too narrow

401 views • 16 slides

Thesis Statements

Thesis Statements. Turning Essential Questions into Thesis Statements. Thesis Statements. You’ve learned what Essential Questions are, brainstormed several possible questions, and decided on the one question you want to explore for your research.

202 views • 11 slides

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Perfect 3-Point Thesis Statement With Samples and Tips

    what three prong thesis statement

  2. PPT

    what three prong thesis statement

  3. PPT

    what three prong thesis statement

  4. PPT

    what three prong thesis statement

  5. PPT

    what three prong thesis statement

  6. PPT

    what three prong thesis statement

VIDEO

  1. Basics + Thesis Statement

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement

  3. Thesis statement teaching video

  4. Thesis Statement| English Essay by Dr Arif Javid

  5. Thesis Statement

  6. Three Minute Thesis Competition Winner

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Perfect 3-Point Thesis Statement With Samples and Tips

    A 3-point thesis statement is a coherent statement that integrates the three essential components of a standard thesis statement, which include a topic, an assertion, and reasons justifying the claim. Basically, the topic should narrowly define the subject. In this case, defending the claim requires writers to highlight a number of reasons.

  2. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Step 1: Start with a question Step 2: Write your initial answer Step 3: Develop your answer Step 4: Refine your thesis statement Types of thesis statements Other interesting articles Frequently asked questions about thesis statements What is a thesis statement? A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay.

  3. How to Write a Three Point Thesis Statement

    A standard thesis statement has three main components: a narrowly defined topic, a claim and reasons that support the claim. If you want a strong thesis statement, you need to make sure that all three of these points are included in it. Step 1 First, identify your topic and narrow it down as much as possible.

  4. 3 Point Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

    A 3-point thesis statement is a succinct and focused sentence that outlines the main arguments or points you intend to address in your paper. It serves as a roadmap for your readers, indicating the core topics or themes you'll explore while presenting your stance or perspective on a particular issue. Example of a 3 Point Thesis Statement

  5. How to Write a Three Prong Thesis

    About the Author A thesis statement is an idea that you state and prove to your readers. Write a three prong thesis to describe your argument and back it up with three points. Use proper essay structure for your thesis.

  6. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Also, we'll provide some thesis statement examples and talk about how to write a thesis statement for different kinds of essays: persuasive, compare-and-contrast, expository, and argumentative essays. The thesis statement is located at the beginning of a paper, in the opening paragraph, making it an essential way to start an essay.

  7. PDF Writing a Strong Thesis Statement

    This handout will include strategies for writing thesis statements for three common types of academic papers: expository, analytical, and argumentative. General Tips A thesis statement generally consists of two parts: your topic, followed • by analysis, explanation(s), or assertion(s) that you're making about the topic.

  8. Developing a Thesis Statement

    A thesis statement . . . Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic. Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper. Is focused and specific enough to be "proven" within the boundaries of your paper. Is generally located near the end ...

  9. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement: 4 Steps + Examples

    Step 4: Revise and refine your thesis statement before you start writing. Read through your thesis statement several times before you begin to compose your full essay. You need to make sure the statement is ironclad, since it is the foundation of the entire paper. Edit it or have a peer review it for you to make sure everything makes sense and ...

  10. The Writing Center

    A thesis statement is: The statement of the author's position on a topic or subject. Clear, concise, and goes beyond fact or observation to become an idea that needs to be supported (arguable). Often a statement of tension, where the author refutes or complicates an existing assumption or claim (counterargument).

  11. Strong Thesis Statements

    First, the word pollution implies that something is bad or negative in some way. Furthermore, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is unambiguously good. Example of a debatable thesis statement:

  12. PDF Thesis Statements and Topic Sentences

    A thesis driven essay is comprised of an initial thesis statement that establishes a claim or argument, and ensuing topic sentences that support and develop that claim. Ideally, a reader would be able to read only the thesis statement and topic sentences of your text, and still be able to understand the main ideas and logical progression of ...

  13. Parts of a Thesis Statement

    The thesis statement is the one sentence that encapsulates the result of your thinking, as it offers your main insight or argument in condensed form. A basic thesis statement has two main parts: Topic: What you're writing about. Angle: What your main idea is about that topic.

  14. The Three-Ingredient Thesis Statement

    The Three-Ingredient Thesis Statement by Purdue Global Academic Success Center and Writing Center · Published August 19, 2015 · Updated August 10, 2015 Molly Wright Starkweather, MA, Kaplan University Writing Center Tutor

  15. Thesis Statement (Three-Pronged)

    •A road map of the essay •A one sentence summary of your essay Everything in your essay will support your thesis A Three-Pronged Thesis Statement • You will use a three-prong thesis...

  16. 25 Thesis Statement Examples That Will Make Writing a Breeze

    What that means is that you can't just put any statement of fact and have it be your thesis. For example, everyone knows that puppies are cute. An ineffective thesis statement would be, "Puppies are adorable and everyone knows it." This isn't really something that's a debatable topic. Something that would be more debatable would be, "A puppy's ...

  17. Thesis Statement Examples

    A thesis statement is usually one sentence that tells the main point of your piece of writing-research paper, essay, etc.. The thesis statement is then "proven" throughout the paper with supporting evidence.. When learning to write thesis statements, you may be taught to write a three-pronged thesis statement.This is a sentence that includes three reasons to support the thesis.

  18. 4.3: What is a Thesis Statement?

    A thesis statement: tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper. is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World ...

  19. How to Write a Thesis Statement: Guide for Students

    5. Provide a Roadmap: Offer a glimpse of the main points or arguments that will be explored in your paper, giving the reader a preview of what to expect. 6. Take a Stance: Clearly express your stance on the topic, making it evident whether you are supporting, refuting, or analyzing a particular idea. 7.

  20. 25 Thesis Statement Examples (2024)

    Strong Thesis Statement Examples. 1. School Uniforms. "Mandatory school uniforms should be implemented in educational institutions as they promote a sense of equality, reduce distractions, and foster a focused and professional learning environment.". Best For: Argumentative Essay or Debate. Read More: School Uniforms Pros and Cons.

  21. Thesis Generator

    Remember that the thesis statement is a kind of "mapping tool" that helps you organize your ideas, and it helps your reader follow your argument. After the topic sentence, include any evidence in this body paragraph, such as a quotation, statistic, or data point, that supports this first point. Explain what the evidence means. Show the reader ...

  22. Three pronged thesis definition in writing

    The so-known as three pronged thesis could be a big help to arrange this kind of essay writing. Inside your opening paragraph carry the readers's attention by utilizing techniques of writing a remarkable essay introduction. It ought to start with a story hook (or motivator) adopted with a sentence presenting the overall theme after which a ...

  23. Three-Pronged Thesis Statements

    Three-Pronged Thesis Statements What is a Thesis Statement? A Three-Pronged Thesis Statement… • Is youropinion/argument. • Organizes your entire essay. • Is always a Complex Sentence. 3 Parts to a Three-Pronged Thesis Statement… • Ask yourself: • What is my topic? 2. What is the significant thing I want to say about my topic? (Your opinion) 3.