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Latin American Studies Dissertations and Theses

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Voces para intentar escribir otra historia: Niños, Cine y Conflicto Armado Colombiano 

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The Connection of Power, People, and Place: Evaluating Environmental Equity Content in the 100 Resilient Cities Strategies of Latin America 

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Universalism and Targeting the Poor: A Dual Approach to Fight Poverty in Brazil (1988-2001) 

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A Woman's Place: The Cuban Revolution and Gender Inequality in the Home 

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DEFINING PERCEPTIONS OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN A GREAT PLAINS AND IN AN ANDEAN WATERSHED 

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The Making of a Crisis in Mexico: An Inductive Analysis of Media Sentiment and Information Cascades on the Value of the Mexican Peso during the 2008 Global Financial Crisis 

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De Ambitu Et Leges De Ambitu 

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To Spain and Back: Changing Roles and Identities of Ecuadorian Female Migrants 

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Affirmative Action in Higher Education and Afro-Descendant Women in Bahia, Brazil 

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The Microfinance Marvel: Where Does Hope Meet Reality? 

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CURRICULAR CHOICES FOR ELITE BILINGUAL SCHOOLS ON COLOMBIA'S CARIBBEAN COAST: AMERICAN ACCREDITATION OR THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

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Misión Madres Del Barrio: A Bolivarian Social Program Recognizing Housework and Creating A Caring Economy in Venezuela 

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Afro-Peruvian Identity and Its Connection with the Land:The Guayabo-Chincha Case 

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The Commercialization of Microfinance: Efficiency or Exploitation? 

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In the Womb of the Earth: Sex in the Maya Cave Setting 

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Family, Work, and Migration: Transborder Networking among Tlapanecs from La Montaña 

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Enterprising Women and Village Banking in Urban Paraguay: Current impacts and future implications for social change 

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  • Latin American Studies

History & Literature’s field of Latin American Studies gives students the opportunity to study the history and literature of Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, Brazil and the Southern Cone in a global context. Students explore topics such as indigenous cultures, conquest and colonization, global latinidad , migration, diaspora, colonial institutions, literary documents such as crónicas and poetry, independence movements, novels and poetry of the period of national self-definition, and the role of these cultures in the history and literature of the twentieth century.

In addition to the requirements for all concentrators (5 tutorials and 1 course that satisfies the language requirement), students in the Latin American Studies field complete the following requirements:

  • 1 survey course on Latin America (the course should cover at least 100 years);
  • 2 courses (1 history and 1 literature) on empire, diaspora, or transnational or comparative topics;
  • 1 course focused on a period before 1900;
  • 4 elective courses in Latin American Studies, balanced between history and literature.

Browse our list of Courses That Count for Latin American Studies , and use the  Latin American Studies Field Worksheet  to plot your course of study. 

Students interested in studying Latinx topics may do so in the Latin American Studies field or in Ethnic Studies or American Studies. Please be in touch with Assistant Directors of Studies Angela Allan or Briana Smith.

Other questions about the Latin American Studies field should be directed to Assistant Director of Studies Laura Quinton .

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Minnie Jang '18

Minnie Jang

Field Worksheet: Latin American Studies: Global Health Sophomore essay topic: The U.S. public health campaign during the Panama Canal’s construction Junior essay topic: The Bolivian film Yawar Malku and the Peace Corps in 1960s Bolivia Senior thesis title: Tracing Trauma: Discourses and Narratives of Experience in Post-Conflict Peru

Talia Rothstein '17

Talia Rothstein

Home » Blog » Dissertation » Topics » Studies » 80 Latin American Studies Research Topics

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80 Latin American Studies Research Topics

FacebookXEmailWhatsAppRedditPinterestLinkedInFor students embarking on the journey of thesis or dissertation research, selecting the right Latin American Studies research topics can be both exhilarating and daunting. Latin American Studies, an interdisciplinary field that delves into the rich cultures, histories, politics, and socio-economic landscapes of Latin America and the Caribbean, offers a vast playground for exploration and […]

Latin American Studies Research Topics

For students embarking on the journey of thesis or dissertation research, selecting the right Latin American Studies research topics can be both exhilarating and daunting. Latin American Studies, an interdisciplinary field that delves into the rich cultures, histories, politics, and socio-economic landscapes of Latin America and the Caribbean, offers a vast playground for exploration and academic inquiry. Whether you’re an undergraduate, master’s, or doctoral candidate, this blog post is your compass to navigate Latin American Studies research topics. In the following paragraphs, we will guide you through diverse captivating research ideas tailored to different degree levels, ensuring you embark on a scholarly adventure that aligns with your academic aspirations and interests.

Latin American Studies, also known as “Latino Studies” or “Hispanic Studies,” is an interdisciplinary field of study that examines the societies, cultures, histories, politics, and economies of Latin America and the Caribbean.

A List Of Potential Research Topics In Latin American Studies:

  • Investigating the perception of Latin American diaspora communities in the UK and their engagement in transnational politics.
  • Assessing the influence of UK foreign policy on trade relations with Latin American countries.
  • Studying the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on food security and access to healthcare in vulnerable populations in Latin America.
  • Assessing the impact of the War on Drugs on human rights in Latin America.
  • Investigating the representation of Latin American women in contemporary cinema.
  • Investigating the cultural exchange between the UK and Latin America through the lens of literature and art.
  • Analyzing the impact of mega-events like the World Cup on Latin American economies.
  • Analyzing the role of education in promoting gender equality in Latin America.
  • Investigating the role of social media in shaping political discourse in Latin American democracies.
  • Investigating the role of music and dance in expressing cultural identity in the Caribbean.
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of UK-sponsored development projects in Latin America and their long-term impact.
  • Investigating the role of women in grassroots political movements across Latin America.
  • Assessing the cultural significance of Carnival celebrations in Brazil.
  • Assessing the influence of British educational institutions in Latin America and their impact on local education systems.
  • Exploring the role of UK-based NGOs and charities in addressing social issues in Latin American countries.
  • Exploring the influence of colonial legacies on contemporary political systems.
  • Assessing the impact of transnational corporations on indigenous communities in Mexico.
  • The impact of indigenous rights legislation on Latin American legal systems.
  • Assessing the effectiveness of government responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in Latin American countries.
  • Evaluating the role of gender and identity studies in shaping Latin American Studies scholarship.
  • Investigating the impact of globalization on the research priorities and methodologies within Latin American Studies.
  • Investigating the cultural significance of cumbia music in Colombia.
  • Examining the prospects and trends in Latin American Studies scholarship and research areas.
  • Examining the influence of cultural festivals on tourism and local economies in the Caribbean.
  • Analyzing the effects of political polarization on democratic institutions in the region.
  • Assessing the role of women in the indigenous political movements of Guatemala.
  • Assessing the effects of foreign direct investment on economic development in South American countries.
  • Evaluating the influence of COVID-19 on migration patterns and remittances in Latin American nations.
  • Investigating the role of misinformation and disinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic in Latin America.
  • Analyzing the impact of indigenous community-led initiatives on sustainable development in Latin America.
  • Assessing tourism’s impact on preserving historical sites in Latin America.
  • Analyzing the representation of Latin American cultures in British media and its effects on identity and stereotypes.
  • Investigating the role of indigenous knowledge in sustainable resource management in Bolivia.
  • Analyzing the role of indigenous knowledge and voices in contemporary Latin American Studies research.
  • Assessing the representation of indigenous cuisine in Latin American gastronomy.
  • Analyzing the influence of religion on political behavior in Latin American countries.
  • Investigating the role of indigenous languages in preserving cultural heritage in Mesoamerica.
  • Exploring the lessons learned from the COVID-19 response in Latin American nations for future public health crises.
  • Assessing the contributions of prominent Latin American scholars to the field of Latin American Studies.
  • Exploring the representation of indigenous peoples in Latin American literature and media.
  • Analyzing the impact of COVID-19 on indigenous communities in Latin America and their resilience strategies.
  • Reviewing the ethical considerations and cultural sensitivity in Latin American Studies research.
  • Assessing the challenges of preserving indigenous languages in urban settings.
  • Investigating the role of social movements in advocating for LGBTQ+ rights in Latin America.
  • Investigating the role of women in peacebuilding efforts in post-conflict Colombia.
  • Analyzing the influence of the Cuban Revolution on Latin American politics and ideology.
  • Investigating the relationship between environmental conservation and indigenous rights.
  • Exploring the challenges and opportunities of renewable energy adoption in the Andean region.
  • Assessing the effectiveness of bilingual education programs for indigenous children in Peru.
  • Analyzing the environmental implications of mega-infrastructure projects in the Amazon rainforest.
  • Exploring the historical roots of social inequality in contemporary Latin American societies.
  • Assessing the impact of land reform policies on rural development in Argentina.
  • Investigating the economic consequences of the COVID-19 crisis on small businesses in Latin America.
  • Exploring the effects of climate change on agricultural practices in Central America.
  • Analyzing the impact of cultural tourism on indigenous communities in Ecuador.
  • Assessing the challenges of healthcare access in rural areas of South America.
  • Currency devaluation and economic stability in Latin America: A monetary economics perspective.
  • Analyzing the impact of Brexit on UK-Latin America economic and diplomatic relations.
  • Analyzing the role of art in promoting social justice in Latin American societies.
  • Analyzing the role of indigenous storytelling in preserving cultural traditions.
  • Exploring the relationship between urbanization and indigenous displacement in Latin America.
  • Assessing the impact of microfinance programs on poverty reduction in Latin America.
  • Exploring the role of digital technology in facilitating remote education during the COVID-19 pandemic in Latin America.
  • Exploring the historical roots of Afro-Latin American music and dance traditions.
  • Exploring the cultural significance of indigenous textiles in Central America.
  • Analyzing the cultural significance of Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico.
  • Analyzing the political consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on governance and social unrest in Latin American countries.
  • Exploring the influence of migration on family dynamics in Latin American communities.
  • Assessing the economic consequences of coffee price fluctuations on small-scale coffee farmers in Central America.
  • Analyzing the role of water scarcity in shaping conflicts in Latin American regions.
  • Analyzing the relationship between political corruption and economic development in Latin America.
  • Exploring the historical roots of Afro-Latin American religions.
  • Analyzing the relationship between deforestation and indigenous land rights in Brazil.
  • Assessing the impact of remittances on household well-being in Central American countries.
  • Exploring the interdisciplinary nature of Latin American Studies and its connections to other fields.
  • Analyzing the portrayal of Latin America in Western academic literature and its impact on cultural perceptions.
  • Exploring the role of NGOs in promoting human rights in Latin America.
  • Exploring the role of indigenous art in cross-cultural understanding.
  • Assessing the effects of political populism on governance and stability in the region.
  • Investigating the influence of Chinese investments in Latin American infrastructure.

In Latin American Studies, the world is your oyster, and the pearls of research topics are as diverse as the region. Whether you’re an undergraduate, master’s, or doctoral student, we’ve provided a curated list of research topics tailored to each degree level, ensuring you find the perfect subject to embark on your academic journey. Latin American Studies is not merely an academic pursuit; it’s a voyage into the heart of a vibrant, multifaceted world waiting to be explored. So, choose your research topic, dive into the rich tapestry of Latin America and the Caribbean, and contribute to the ever-evolving discourse of this captivating field. The possibilities are endless, and your scholarly adventure awaits.

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Latin American Research Review (LARR)

Latin American Research Review (LARR)

The Latin American Research Review (LARR) is the flagship journal of the Latin American Studies Association, in continuous publication since 1965. LARR publishes original research and review essays on Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latina/Latino studies. The journal covers the social sciences and the humanities, including the fields of anthropology, cultural studies, economics, history, literature, political science, and sociology. Now published by Cambridge University Press, LARR has been open access and online-only since 2017 (vol. 52). Issues from 2017 to the present are available without subscription at https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/latin-american-research-review . Back content for this journal can be found on JSTOR (vols. 1–53) and Project Muse (vols. 38–51). LASA members can access volumes 1–51 on the LASA website .

The journal reviews and publishes papers in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. All papers, except for book and documentary film review essays, are subject to double-blind peer review. New manuscripts can be submitted at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/larr . See the journal website for more information.

The Latin American Research Review (LARR), the academic journal of the Latin American Studies Association, has been in continuous publication since 1965. LARR publishes original research and review essays on Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latina/Latino studies. It covers the social sciences and the humanities, including the fields of anthropology, economics, history, literature and cultural studies, political science, and sociology. The journal reviews and publishes papers in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. All papers, except for book and documentary film review essays, are subject to double-blind peer review.

We are pleased to announce that the  Latin American Research Review  will be published by Cambridge University Press beginning in 2022. New content will continue to appear until the end of 2021 at  larrlasa.org , where the journal has been published since 2017. Beginning September 15, 2021, new manuscript submissions will be redirected to  LARR’s   new submission site .

Since 2017,  LARR  has been published in open access and online-only format. No subscription is needed to access content published after 2017. Back content from 1965 to 2012 can be found on  JSTOR . Content from 2003 to 2016 is available at  Project Muse . Back content through 2016 is available on the  LASA website  to LASA members.

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Latin American and Latinx Studies

The thesis is the capstone of the Latin American Studies major and, given the nature of the program, an interdisciplinary project. It should build on what you have learned in your coursework about Latin America, its history, its culture, its relation to other parts of the world, and the issues that constitute its present reality.

The thesis is completed during either the fall or winter semester of the senior year. Faculty in the program may invite students to write a year-long honors thesis. Such invitations will be made in the spring of the previous year.

All students are required to complete a thesis proposal in the academic semester prior to undertaking the thesis. Please note that students should be on campus the semester prior to writing the senior thesis. The proposal consists of the components indicated below and must be submitted to the chair of Latin American Studies by the dates listed. We encourage students to seek out LAS faculty members for advice and guidance in developing their proposals.

Please note that the proposal is important to the LAS Program Committee’s planning for the following year. A poorly written, incomplete, or missing proposal will mean that the Committee cannot give your thesis plans serious consideration and that you will likely be left without useful feedback or an assigned thesis advisor. For the same reasons, major changes in thesis topic cannot be allowed after you have submitted your thesis proposal.

The proposal must include the following information.

I. Project Description (750 words)

  • Provide a clear statement of the thesis topic and the key questions you plan to address. Include a discussion of the sources you expect to use and how you plan to use them.
  • Explain how your proposed thesis topic connects to your previous coursework.

II. Annotated Preliminary Bibliography (at least 5-6 scholarly sources)

III. List of three potential faculty thesis advisors in order of preference

  • Fall thesis writers: the thesis proposal is due by 8 a.m. the last Friday in March of the student’s junior year.
  • Winter thesis writers: the thesis proposal is due by 8:00 a.m. the Friday after Thanksgiving of the student’s senior year.

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  • Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies Subject Guide
  • Exploring Broad Topics in Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies

Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies Subject Guide — Exploring Broad Topics in Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies

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Exploring Broad Topics

Exploring broad topics in recent Latin American Studies scholarship is a good way to start thinking about potential topics for your essay, research paper, or project. As you explore some of the broad topics in recent scholarship, consider:

  • What are the expectations around the essay, paper, or project? Are there specific geographic or temporal requirements for the assignment?
  • What interests you most about some of the broad topics? What are some of the ways that they connect with your interests inside and outside of the classroom?

For the next steps of identifying and narrowing a specific topic and finding sources, start to notice: 

  • How do scholars describe their topics? Do you notice key terms that repeat or that might be useful for a broader search?
  • Are there specific countries or regions that are more or less represented in scholarship on a particular topic? 
  • Do you notice overlap between some of the broad topics? How might you combine some of the topics to narrow or expand your own research focus?

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  • Cybertesis : tesis electrónicas en línea This link opens in a new window Cybertesis.Net is a cooperative project between the Université de Montréal, the Université de Lyon2, the University of Chile and 32 universities in Europe, Africa and Chile that allows access to more than 27,000 full text theses and dissertations. Some institutions have opted to digitize theses dating back to the 1700s. [Coverage: 1700s-present]
  • Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD) This link opens in a new window The Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD) is an international organization dedicated to promoting the adoption, creation, use, dissemination and preservation of electronic analogues to the traditional paper-based theses and dissertations. This website contains information about the initiative, how to set up Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) programmes, how to create and locate ETDs, and current research in digital libraries related to NDLTD and ETDs.
  • Open Access Theses and Dissertations This link opens in a new window OATD.org aims to be the best possible resource for finding open access graduate theses and dissertations published around the world. Metadata (information about the theses) comes from over 1000 colleges, universities, and research institutions. OATD currently indexes 2,311,795 theses and dissertations.

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120 amazing latin american research paper topics.

January 2, 2020

Do you have the task of writing a Latin American research paper? The first step is coming up with a great topic. This is one of the major challenges for most students. But you do not need to worry anymore because we are here to help. Here are the best 120 Latin American research topics that you can consider.

latin american research paper topics

Mixed Latin American Research Paper Topics

  • A closer look at the history of the church and human rights in Latin America.
  • An in-depth analysis of Latin American feminist theology.
  • Exploring the women’s rights in Latin America: A case study of Peru and Colombia.
  • Analyzing the implications of foreign debt on Latin America countries.
  • The impact of the Cold War on Latin America.
  • Analyzing the commonest management styles in Latin American companies.
  • Discuss the main components of Latino culture.
  • Analyzing key economic challenges affecting economic development in Latin America.
  • Impact of outside trading forces on Latin America development.
  • Significance of tourism in Latin America.
  • Analyzing social, political trends in Latin America: A case study of Argentina and Cuba.
  • Evaluate the role played by the military in Latin America studies.
  • Analyzing the first contact between early Spanish settlers and Latin Americans.
  • Meso American civilizations: A case study of Maya civilization.
  • Implications of music on Latino children: A case study of salsa music.
  • Modernism in South America.
  • The history of the Panama Canal.
  • Political consequences of Neo-Liberalism in South America.
  • Analyzing the invention of Latin America.
  • Taking a closer look at the new age of Latin America.
  • Evaluating US involvement in Latin America.

Latin America Research Topics about Brazil

  • Analyzing the cultural relations between Brazil and the US.
  • A closer look at the evolution of Brazil culture.
  • Evaluating the different governments of Brazil.
  • The economy of Brazil during the Cold War.
  • The influence of the Roman Catholic Church in Brazil.
  • Discuss the importance of Brazil’s rainforest in addressing global warming.
  • Comparing Brazil and the US education systems.
  • Comparing the Indian and Brazilian economies.
  • Brazil and global economics: A Closer look at Brazil Role in the BRICS.
  • Neo-liberalism IN Brazil: What are the consequences?
  • The Brazil’s quest for autonomy: Analyzing Brazil’s foreign policy under President Lula.
  • Urban poverty in Rio.

Latin American Topics about Costa Rica

  • Evaluating the business climate in Costa Rica.
  • A closer look at Costa Rica’s economic challenges in the Cold War era.
  • A comprehensive analysis of Costa Rica’s economic performance.
  • Efforts to address global warming in Costa Rica: A case study of Klinki Forestry Project.
  • Analyzing the main problems facing Costa Rica.
  • Deforestation in Costa Rica.
  • Tourism in Costa Rica.
  • Comparing the history of coffee in Costa Rica and Brazil.
  • Analyzing contemporary issues in Costa Rica Tourism.
  • Analyzing the main exports and imports of Costa Rica.
  • A closer look at key political issues in Costa Rica.
  • Comparing culture and ethics in Costa Rica and Mexico.
  • What is the future of Costa Rica’s economic growth?

Unique Latin American Research Topics

  • Effects of El Nino in South America.
  • The relationship between Argentina’s economy and the black market.
  • Key elements of Argentina’s democracy.
  • Analyzing the sexual behavior of Amazon people.
  • The history of Chile’s economic growth.
  • Comparing the economic growths of Chile and Mexico.
  • Analyzing the persistence of drug lords in Colombia.
  • What implications does drug trafficking have on the Colombian economy?
  • Comparing the education system of Peru and Brazil.
  • The effect of remittance in Latin America economy.
  • History of slavery in South America.
  • Democracy in Latin America.
  • A closer look at enlightenment in Latin America.
  • Analyzing independent movements in Latin America
  • Analyzing Latin America after the end of the Wars of Independence.

Latin American Topics on the Caribbean

  • Evaluating the significance of Grenada Island during the Cold War.
  • Comparing the ethnic slave rebellion in Bahia and Caribbean.
  • Comparing the history of slavery in the Caribbean and the US.
  • A review of the Haiti revolution.
  • Highlighting the struggles of Marielitos.
  • A closer look at socioeconomic struggles in Barbados.
  • Analyzing the problem of racism in Cuba.
  • A closer look at the history of Haiti between 1843 and 1973.
  • Analyzing the US involvement in Haiti in the early 20 th century.

Latin American Research Paper Topics about Cuba

  • Analyzing music development in Cuba.
  • What factors drive Cubans to immigrate to the US?
  • Analyzing the Aesthetic beauty of Cuba.
  • Comparing slavery in Virginia, the USA with Slavery in Cuba.
  • What is Fidel Castro’s greatest social economic contribution to Cuba?
  • Comparing the Cuban and Brazilian economies.
  • What are the key cultural similarities between Cuban and Americans?
  • Evaluating the economic performance of Cuba after World War II.
  • A closer look at the medical industry in Cuba.
  • What is the future of Cuban economic growth?

Latin America Topics about Guatemala

  • Analyzing the performance of Guatemala economy after the Cold War.
  • A review of Guatemala’s attitudes towards Axis and Allied powers in the World War II.
  • Comparing Guatemala and Costa Rica’s coffee management processes.
  • A review of Guatemala’s trade relationships with the US.
  • Analyzing the sufferings and abuses of Guatemala’s children during the country’s civil wars.
  • Guatemala history: Evaluating the fall of President Arbenz.
  • Comparing the culture of Guatemalans and Brazilians.
  • Analyzing the Guatemala government’s efforts on conservation.

Latin America Research Topics on Mexico

  • What are the main challenges of the Mexico’s education system?
  • Analyzing the Zapatista Revolution.
  • Was the 1914-1916 Woodrow Wilson’s intervention in Mexico Justified?
  • The colonization of Texas by Mexico.
  • Comparing the Mexican art of the 19 th and 20 th centuries.
  • Analyzing the hybrid Mexico culture.
  • What are the key success factors of the 1990s Mexican film success?
  • Comparing the Mexican and US culture: What are the key differences?
  • A closer look at the economic performance of Mexico after the Cold War?
  • Illegal Mexican immigrants.
  • Should the US use a more protected border with Mexico?
  • The history of Aztec Empire.
  • What is the future of Mexico economy?
  • Analyzing the major problems that Mexico experienced under the leadership of President Zedillo.
  • Comparing the US and Mexico justice systems.
  • What were the main causes of the Mexican Peso crisis of the 1990s?
  • Latin America telenovelas.
  • Comparing conservatives and liberals after revolutionary Latin America.
  • A closer look at the Cuban embargo.
  • What factors led to the Mexican revolution.

Latin American Research Topics: Puerto Rico

  • The importance of Puerto Rico during the 18 th -century slave labor and trade.
  • Analyzing the controversy of Puerto Rico’s statehood.
  • Analyzing the industrialization of Puerto Rico.
  • Comparing the Puerto Rican and Brazilian cultures.

Controversial Topics in Latin America

  • The growing Chinese influence in Latin America.
  • Analyzing the discovery of America via Latin America.
  • The struggle for national identity in South America.
  • History of Latin America: Taking a closer look at the rights of Portugal over Latin America.
  • Mexican Peso crisis of the 1990s: Was Bill Clinton’s decision for bailout justified?
  • Analyzing the US-Cuban relationship during the Cold War.
  • Guatemala history: Evaluating the fall of President Arbenz and the possible involvement of the US government.
  • Drug trade in South America: What are the historical roots?

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  • BA in Latin American Studies

To contact an academic advisor for Latin American Studies, please visit the Pardee School Student Affairs & Services website .

The Latin American Studies (LAS) major provides students with a versatile and powerful vehicle for developing an in-depth understanding of the complexities and remarkable diversity of the Latin American region, defined as the 20 independent countries in the Western Hemisphere that are south of the United States, with Spanish, French, or Portuguese as their official languages. The major is broadly interdisciplinary, drawing on a wide range and variety of regionally focused courses taught by faculty experts in fields including archaeology, economics, history, history of art and architecture, musicology and ethnomusicology, international relations, political science, romance studies, geography, political economy, health sciences, and sociology.

The major combines coursework across historical, artistic and literary, and contemporary contexts with an integrating course taught jointly by members of the LAS faculty, as well as substantial study of Spanish or Portuguese to gain functional proficiency in a language used extensively in the region. LAS faculty closely advise each student in the major to ensure intellectual coherence between the student’s interests and coursework.

Study abroad at one of Boston University’s Study Abroad programs in Latin America for at least a semester is strongly encouraged. Courses abroad count toward Latin American Studies major requirements.

Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate substantive interdisciplinary knowledge of legal, political, economic, social, cultural, and historical factors influencing Latin American Studies.
  • Display an in-depth understanding of an important functional subfield of the discipline and a major geographical region of the world.
  • Conduct theoretically informed and empirically based analysis of real-world conditions and events and present the results of that analysis persuasively in written and oral forms.

Requirements

All BU undergraduate students, including both entering first-year and transfer students, will pursue coursework in the BU Hub, the University’s general education program that is integrated into the entire undergraduate experience. BU Hub requirements can be satisfied in a number of ways, including coursework in and beyond the major as well as through cocurricular activities. Students majoring in Latin American Studies will ordinarily, through coursework in the major, satisfy BU Hub requirements in Diversity, Civic Engagement, and Global Citizenship, as well as some requirements in Philosophical, Aesthetic and Historical Interpretation, Scientific and Social Inquiry, Communication, and the Intellectual Toolkit. Remaining BU Hub requirements will be satisfied by selecting from a wide range of available courses outside the major or, in some cases, cocurricular experiences.

Ten principal courses, including one integrating course, with a final grade of C or higher, of which eight must be at the 300-level or above:

  • Two courses from Group 1 (Historical Context)
  • Two courses from Group 2 (Literary, Artistic, and Cultural Contexts)
  • Two courses from Group 3 (Contemporary Context)
  • Three electives from LAS course offerings chosen in consultation with an advisor
  • One integrating course, usually taken in the student’s junior or senior year: CAS IR 410 Latin America Today: An Interdisciplinary Approach (topic changes every year)

Foreign Language Requirement

Completion of a fifth-semester course in either Spanish or Portuguese (one course beyond the College of Arts & Sciences language requirement).

Consult departmental listings for complete course descriptions . Unless otherwise indicated, all required courses are 4 credit hours.

Group 1: Historical Context

  • CAS AA 385 Atlantic History (meets with CAS HI 350)
  • CAS AA 489 The African Diaspora in the Americas (meets with CAS HI 489)
  • CAS AR 201 Americas Before Columbus
  • CAS AR 222 Art and Architecture of Ancient America
  • CAS AR 250 The Aztecs, Maya, and Their Predecessors: Archaeology of Mesoamerica
  • CAS AR 251 Ancient Maya Civilization
  • CAS AR 551 Studies in Mesoamerican Archaeology
  • CAS HI 350 Atlantic History (meets with AA 385)
  • CAS HI 397 Modern Latin America
  • CAS HI 489 The African Diaspora in the Americas (meets with AA 489)
  • CAS HI 582 Social Movements in Twentieth-Century Latin America
  • CAS HI 584 Labor, Sexuality, and Resistance in the Afro-Atlantic World (meets with AA 514)
  • CAS IR 394 Power, Leadership, and Governance in Africa and the Caribbean (meets with AA 395 and HI 352)

Group 2: Literary, Artistic, and Cultural Context

  • CAS AH 114 Kongo to Cuba: Art, Exchange, and Self-Determination in Africa and Latin America
  • CAS AH 242 Latin American Art Since Contact
  • CAS AH 323 Topics in Latin American Art
  • CAS AH 527 Topics in Art and Society
  • CAS AH 543 Latin American Art and the Cold War
  • CAS LP 305 Topics in Portuguese Language and Culture
  • CAS LP 352 Tropical Metropolis and Brazil Modernity
  • CAS LP 360 Introduction to Brazilian Cinema (in English translation)
  • CAS LP 362 Inventing Brazil (in English translation)
  • CAS LS 307 Spanish Through Literature & Arts
  • CAS LS 308 Spanish Through Film and New Media
  • CAS LS 350 Introduction to Hispanic Texts
  • CAS LS 452 Topics in Latin American Literature and Culture
  • CAS LS 455 Spanish American Literature Through the Nineteenth Century
  • CAS LS 457 Twentieth-Century Spanish-American Literature
  • CAS LS 576 Topics in Spanish-American Literature
  • CAS LS 579 Topics in Hispanic Cinemas
  • CAS LS 581 The Mexican Revolution Revisited
  • CFA FA 540 Arts and Culture in Mexico, Revolution to the Present
  • CFA MH 561 World Music Ensemble
  • CFA MH 563 World Music in Culture
  • GRS AH 742 Colloquium in Latin American Art

Group 3: Contemporary Context

  • CAS AA/HI/IR 395/352/392 Power, Leadership, and Governance in Africa and the Caribbean
  • CAS EC 369 Economic Development of Latin America
  • CAS HI 587 US-Mexican Borders
  • CAS IR 242 Globalization and World Poverty (meets with SO 242)
  • CAS IR 251 Introduction to Comparative Politics (meets with PO 151)
  • CAS IR 290 Drugs and Security in the Americas (meets with HI 331)
  • CAS IR 302 Campaigns and Elections Around the World (meets with PO 325)
  • CAS IR 367 Introduction to Latin American Politics and International Relations (meets with HI 399 and PO 360)
  • CAS IR 375 International Law and Organization
  • CAS IR 395 North-South Relations (meets with PO 328)
  • CAS IR 411 Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Latin America (meets with PO 566)
  • CAS IR 425 Seminar: Women and Social Change in the Developing World (meets with SO 420)
  • CAS IR 502 Latin-American Political Parties (meets with PO 561)
  • CAS IR 529 Cuba in Transition
  • CAS IR 566 History of Deportation & Border Security in the Americas
  • CAS IR 568 US–Latin-American Relations (meets with HI 523 and PO 565)
  • CAS IR 590 Political Economy of Latin America (meets with PO 562)
  • CAS IR 592 Economic Development and International Institutions
  • CAS IR 597 Development and Environment in Latin America (meets with GE 597)
  • CAS PO 381 History of American Foreign Relations since 1898 (meets with HI 287)
  • CAS PO 561 Latin American Political Parties
  • CAS RN 383 African Diaspora Religions

Integrating Courses

  • CAS IR 410 Latin America Today: An Interdisciplinary Approach (topic changes each year)

Note: Courses not listed above may fulfill Latin American Studies major requirements with approval from the program director.

  • Honors in the Major

Honors in the Latin American Studies major within the Pardee School may be earned by completing two semesters of independent senior honors work (CAS IR 401/402) and presenting an original research paper (thesis) in written and oral form to a committee of faculty readers. The committee will consider both the thesis and the result of the oral examination to determine whether the student will receive honors in the major. A grade of B+ or better in each semester of CAS IR 401/402 is also required for the award of honors. CAS IR 401 carries one of each of the following Hub units: Writing-Intensive, Critical Thinking, and Research & Information Literacy. CAS IR 402 carries one unit in Writing-Intensive and a unit in Oral and/or Signed Communication. Students are required to attend structured workshops in the fall and spring related to each of these competencies. The research and writing is conducted under the guidance of a faculty advisor who will serve as the instructor of record for CAS IR 401/402. In consultation with their faculty advisor, students are also required to complete cocurricular activities that expand their understanding of their research topic. Latin American Studies majors may earn principal course credit for CAS IR 401 and 402.

Admission to the Latin American Studies Honors program requires a 3.50 cumulative and 3.60 major grade point average, at the time of application. To learn more about the application process, please visit the Pardee School of Global Studies website . Interested students should contact their Academic Advisor to discuss ideas for research and faculty advisors. Students typically apply for the Honors program in the spring of their junior year. Effective fall 2022, students may not simultaneously study abroad and participate in the Honors program.

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MA in Latin American Studies

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The Center for Latin American Studies houses the interdisciplinary Master's degree in Latin American Studies. Our students benefit from working with faculty from various disciplines and from creating a degree plan tailored to their research interests. 

In addition to the information contained in the Graduate School Handbook , our incoming and current students should familiarize themselves with the LATAMST Graduate Handbook below.

Master of Arts in Latin American Studies: Graduate Handbook

The M.A. in Latin American Studies is an interdisciplinary degree granted by the Graduate School, administered by the Center for Latin American Studies and overseen by the Latin American Studies Graduate Studies Committee. The program is designed to prepare students who desire to continue their undergraduate studies in international relations and diplomacy, economic development and globalization, languages and literatures, history and anthropology, business and economics, to acquire a broader knowledge of Latin America or concentrated training in specific disciplines and/or topics regarding Latin America. This encompasses different scenarios, such as students who want to a) prepare to continue graduate studies in a discipline-specific Ph.D. program; b) complement with further specialization on Latin America in a discipline-specific M.A. or Ph.D. graduate program they are currently enrolled in; or c) pursue a non-academic career in government (including the foreign service and the military); pre-college and community college education; educational institutions or other non-profit institutions with a cultural mission; or in the private sector, such as law, journalism, international business, etc. 

This program is intended to serve undergraduate students who desire to continue graduate studies, and graduate students who wish to pursue a dual degree and complement with a rounded interdisciplinary formation on Latin American Studies the discipline-specific degree they are currently pursuing (e.g. in Anthropology, History, Economics, Spanish, etc.). It constitutes a well-defined, intellectually cohesive structure that provides students with a balanced, solid foundation for their future careers, but nonetheless, it is flexible enough to accommodate students who enter with different levels of preparation and allows for its completion in normally two academic years. 

Students pursuing a M.A. or Ph.D. at Ohio State in any department or discipline (Political Science, Anthropology, Sociology, etc.) and who wish to complement it with further specialization in Latin American Studies can apply to the M.A. in Latin American Studies (LAS) as a dual degree. The application process for the dual degree program is very simple, and the coursework needed is significantly reduced, since up to 50 percent of the credits used for one degree can be used for the second degree. In other words, it will require only 15 credit hours (normally International Studies 5640 plus 12 credit hours in an area of concentration other than their primary discipline) to fulfill the requirements for the M.A. in LAS as a dual degree. 

Admission of students to the program is the dual responsibility of the Graduate School and the Latin American Studies Graduate Studies Committee. Candidates for admission to the program must hold at least a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. Applicants will be expected to meet or exceed minimum Graduate School requirements for GPA levels. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 for all previous undergraduate work and 3.2 for all previous graduate work is required. Applicants should demonstrate at the time of admission intermediate-high writing and speaking proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese, or the equivalent of at least six semesters of undergraduate work in these languages. Applications will be due in the Spring semester for students matriculating in the next Fall. 

GRE scores are no longer required of applicants. However, any student, international or domestic, wishing to be considered for nomination to one of the University's Fellowship awards must submit their GRE scores. 

Application is done through the Graduate School Admissions website. Applicants should complete the appropriate admission forms, and submit a transcript from each college or university attended; a curriculum vitae; three letters of recommendation from people who have direct, first-hand knowledge of applicants' intellectual capability and academic potential; a statement of purpose detailed past achievements, present research interests, educational objectives, career plans, and reasons for choosing a field of study. When applicants apply a number of years after completing their last degree, admission will also take into consideration experience-based language acquisition, social work and any similar pertinent non-academic endeavors 

International Students 

Students whose first language is not English, and who have not earned a degree in an English-speaking country, are required, as a condition of admission, to take and pass an English language proficiency exam. As per Ohio State's Graduate School guidelines, for the TOEFL exam the minimum score is 19 on each section of the paper-based TOEFL, 79 on the TOEFL iBT or TOEFL iBT Home Edition, or 550 on the TOEFL ITP for students in the American Language Program; for the IELTS exam the minimum score is 7.0 on the IELTS Academic test or IELTS Indicator. 

International students who fall into the category specified above and who wish to be given appointment as a Graduate Teaching Associate (GTA) must, additionally, according to the laws of the State of Ohio, certify their proficiency in spoken English before assuming GTA duties involving direct student contact. They may become certified by scoring acceptably on the TOEFL or the Oral Proficiency Assessment . 

Internationa students whose first language is not English, and who have not earned a degree in an English-speaking country should also be aware that they are required to take a written English placement examination upon arrival on this campus. Based on the testing result, students needing English instruction will be placed in corresponding English courses. These courses do not count toward graduation. For further information of importance to students from abroad, please see the International Students page of the Office of International Affairs. 

All applications for admission are processed through the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions. The online application is found at the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions website . Among the materials that all applicants (domestic or foreign) are required to submit are: 

  • The completed application; 
  • A current CV/resume; 
  • A statement of purpose detailing your past achievements, present research interests, educational objectives, career plans, and reasons for choosing your field of study; 
  • Three levels of recommendation, preferably from faculty members who are familiar with your work; 
  • Unofficial transcripts from each college or university (Official transcripts will be requested upon admission; if from a foreign institution the transcript must be accompanied by an English translation) 

The statement of purpose should be concisely written and not exceed two pages in length. Non-native English speaking applicants from foreign countries must also submit the results of their English language proficiency exam, and international applicants must submit a certified statement indicating that financial resources are available to defray the cost of graduate education. (Ordinarily, the awarding of a GTAship, GRAship, or another fellowship is sufficient to meet the requirements of this statement. All those applying for a dual degree that wish to be considered for appointment as GTA in other programs are asked to fill out a separate application for that position. This application is available at the corresponding department's website. 

For full consideration for admission, materials should be submitted by February 1 on the Spring for admission in the following academic year. 

More information about graduate applications at Ohio State can be found at the Graduate School Handbook. Graduate students who take a leave of absence for 3 or more semesters may be asked to re-apply to the program.

The primary funding source for LAS M.A. students is the U.S. Department of Education's Title VI Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship . There are two types of FLAS fellowships (Academic Year and Summer), with separate competitions held for each. The purpose of the FLAS is to increase the number of U.S. citizens and permanent residents who study and speak Latin American Languages. The graduate level academic year FLAS includes tuition and fee authorizations for full-time enrollment for the two semesters of the academic year, and a $20,000 stipend. In exchange for receiving the FLAS, students agree to enroll full-time, including a 3-credit-hour Latin American language course and a 3-credit-hour Latin American Studies course each semester in addition to the regular course load. Summer FLAS fellowships provide students with a $3,500 stipend and up to $5,000 in tuition and fee authorizations for intensive summer language programs in the U.S. and abroad. FLAS applications are available through CLAS and are due February 1. 

Additionally, highly-qualified applicants are eligible for fellowships awarded by the Graduate School, and need to be nominated by the Latin American Studies Graduate Studies Committee. The purpose of these highly prestigious awards is to permit students of unusual promise to be freed from teaching duties in order to devote all their time to their studies. Most awards are for one year only,  although some carry stipends that cover two years, and a small number cover three years. All Graduate School fellowships provide a waiver of tuition and academic fees, in addition to the basic stipend. 

The Center for Latin American Studies cannot appoint Graduate Teaching Associates (GTAs) or Graduate Research Associates (GRAs). 

The university also offers several grants and fellowships available for travel for research abroad. 

Applicants should demonstrate at the time of admission of the following: a) a native or near-native proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese; b) a bachelor’s degree in Spanish or Portuguese; c) communicative competence in Spanish or Portuguese equivalent to six semesters of undergraduate work. Knowledge of another Latin American language, including any indigenous language, is a plus.

A minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate level (5000 level and above) courses are required of all students. Students are required to earn a grade of at least “B” (3.0) in all courses to remain in the program. At least 18 credits must be from courses with a minimum of 25 percent Latin American content as assessed in the syllabi. Courses with less than 25% Latin American content that have comparative, theoretical, methodological, or professional relevance to the student’s program can be taken in consultation with the academic advisor and the final approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. Some courses offered at the 4500 level can be taken as independent studies with the concurrence of the course instructor, the academic advisor, and the final approval of the Graduate Studies Committee. In all cases, the student must write a research paper focused on Latin America as part of the coursework.  

Required Courses (6 credits) 

  • International Studies 5640, Globalization and Latin America: Multi-Disciplinary Approaches 
  • One course on research methods, related to the student’s primary area of concentration, selected in consultation with the advisor from a number of qualitative and quantitative methodology courses offered in different departments, with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.  

Two Areas of Concentration (21 credits) 

Students will choose or design, in consultation with their advisor and advisory committee, two areas of disciplinary or interdisciplinary concentration. They will take at least 4 courses for a total of 12 credit hours in the primary concentration, and at least 3 courses for a total of 9 credit hours in the secondary concentration. Students writing a thesis may use up to 3 of the 12 credit hours allocated to the primary concentration toward their thesis writing. Each student is required to take at least 2 graduate seminars, one in each area of concentration, in which they will produce a research paper that indicated that they have mastered the skills of research, synthesis, and analysis required for academic scholarship. Thesis track students may use these papers as the basis for their thesis. The areas of concentration may be chosen from any of the following options: 

Disciplinary concentrations 

  • Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics 
  • Anthropology 
  • Brazilian Literature and Cultures 
  • Business 
  • Education, Teaching and Learning 
  • Film Studies 
  • Geography 
  • Hispanic Linguistics 
  • History 
  • Latin American Literatures and Cultures 
  • Political Science 
  • Sociology 
  • Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 

Interdisciplinary concentrations, such as: 

  • Border and Latinx Studies 
  • Democratization and Globalization Studies 
  • Development and the Environment 
  • Gender Studies 
  • Latin American Cultural Studies 
  • Postcolonial and Indigenous Studies 
  • Transnational Migration 

Each student, in consultation with their advisory committee and with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee, may design additional ad-hoc interdisciplinary concentrations.  

Electives (3 credits) 

After completing their requirements students will be able to choose one elective course, which could be related to any of the two areas of concentration nor not, insofar it contains a minimum of 25% Latin American content. 

By the end of the first academic year (if pursuing the degree in the regular two-year model) or by the end of the first semester (if pursuing the degree in the fast-track one-year model), all students will be required to choose, in consultation with their M.A. advisory committee, either the thesis or non-thesis track. 

Thesis track 

If a student chooses the thesis track, they will be expected to complete a substantial monograph (of approximately 80-100 pages in length, depending on the subject) on an original topic (theses overlapping is not allowed), in which they will be required to utilize their primary Latin American language as one of the main research tools. The principal purpose of the thesis is to demonstrate the student’s ability to conduct sustained independent research on a Latin American subject related to one or both areas of concentration. The student must produce a written thesis prospectus that must be approved by the advisory committee at least one semester before the final defense. The thesis will be defended orally before the M.A. advisory committee in the last semester of the program. 

Thesis track students may register for up to 3 credits of thesis research which will count as part of the 12 credits toward the main specialization without special permission. It is strongly recommended that students planning to apply to a Ph.D. program choose the thesis track. 

Non-Thesis Track 

If a student chooses the non-thesis track, they are required to take two take-home examinations, followed by an oral examination, in both areas of concentration. 

Students receive authorization to take the examination only after they have presented to the Director of the Latin American Studies M.A. Program an updated Curriculum Plan and the Reading List endorsed by their advisor. The length and content of the reading lists will be determined in consultation with the student’s committee members, but as a general guideline the total length of the combined reading list should be between 75 and 100 items (books and/or articles). This document should be submitted by the end of the the semester preceding the semester during which the student intends to take the examination. Students must be registered for at least three graduate credit hours during the semester in which the M.A. examination is taken. 

The Master’s Examination is a test of the student’s knowledge of their two areas of concentration. They are the ultimate validation of performance within the M.A. program. Students receive authorization to take the examination only after they have presented to the Director of Graduate Studies an updated Curriculum Plan endorsed by their advisor. Ideally, this document should be submitted by the end of the semester preceding the semester during which the student intends to take the examination, but must necessarily be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies at the time of the filling of the Application to Graduate form. The student must be registered for at least three graduate credit hours during the semester in which the examination is taken. 

The M.A. examination is a single examination consisting of two portions, written and oral. Both portions deal with the student’s two areas of concentration. The written portion consists of a thesis (thesis track) or two take-home examinations (non-thesis track). In the latter case, the student will receive the exam questions electronically on the date and time pre-arranged with the M.A. advisory committee, and will submit the written responses electronically no more than 48 hours later. Responses should be written either in English, Spanish, Portuguese, or other appropriate Latin American language. The oral portion of the examination will not be more than 120 minutes in length, and is scheduled to take place no later than one week after the completion of the written examinations. The M.A. in Latin American Studies exam has four evaluation categories: High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, and Fail. The M.A. examination is based on the course work that the student has taken and on a short, selective reading list prepared by the student under the guidance of their M.A. advisory committee. This reading list must be submitted to the Graduate Secretary alongside the M.A. Curriculum Plan. 

For the thesis, take-home exams, and oral examinations, the student will be guided by their academic advisor and advisory committee. The academic advisor chairs the examination committee and for students completing the non-thesis track, their advisor is responsible for: 1) soliciting and collecting questions for the written portion from the other members of the committee; 2) putting the written examination in final, fully edited, form; and 3) making sure that the candidate and the committee members receive the questions and written responses by the date required. 

The oral examination is not restricted to the questions asked on the written examination. It may, in fact, include any topic covered in the course that the student has taken or included on the reading list. The oral examination is regarded as an integral part of the total examination, and is not graded separately from the written portion. The language of the oral examination may be English, Spanish, or Portuguese, depending on the conditions set by the examining committee. All members of the examination committee must be present during the entire oral examination and are expected to participate fully in the questioning and the discussion of and decision on the result. 

At the conclusion of the oral portion of the exam, the examining committee will determine if the student has passed the entire examination and will inform the student of the examination result. The student is considered to have completed the Master’s Examination successfully only when the decision of the committee is unanimously affirmative. Each examiner indicates judgement by signing the Master’s Examination Report that must be submitted to the Graduate School no later than two weeks prior to commencement. 

If the examination committee does not evaluate the examination as passing, the committee will recommend whether the student may retake the examination, and which portions will be retaken. If a second examination is held, the examination committee must be the same as the original one, unless a substitution is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. The second examination will normally be scheduled no earlier than the semester following the semester of failure, particularly in the event that both areas of the examination need to be retaken. The timing of the second examination is left to the discretion of the Examination Committee. 

On written appeal by the student or a member of the Master’s Examination Committee, the Policy and Standards Committee of the Council on Research and Graduate Studies will review the Master’s Examination to ensure its conformity to the Graduate School rules and to determine if it was conducted fairly and without prejudice to the student. 

A dual degree program is defined as a graduate student’s pursuing any two graduate degree concurrently, with the exception of two PhD programs. A dual degree program can be the concurrent pursuit of a master’s degree and any other graduate degree (master’s, PhD, or a professional doctorate) or a PhD and a professional doctorate. The dual program does not apply to students pursuing a master’s and a PhD in the same graduate program. 

The student and advisor(s) in each graduate program must plan an integrated course of study to satisfy the requirements of both degree programs. The program plan form for dual degree students must be completed and submitted to the Graduate School within one semester of planning the integrated course of study with both advisors. 

Students who are interested in pursuing a concurrent second degree are not required to reapply through the Graduate Admissions Office. Rather, they should contact the Graduate Studies Committee chair and/or the Graduate Coordinator in the proposed second degree program to gain a clear understanding of the graduate program’s application process and deadlines. 

Typically, students will complete a separate master’s examination for each degree program. However, if the following conditions are satisfied, a student pursuing two thesis option master’s degree programs may be required to complete only one master’s examination and one thesis. The Graduate Studies Committee in each graduate program must approve. 

Students pursuing a master’s degree in one graduate program and a PhD in a separate program must submit a Dual Degree Program Plan form to pursue the two degrees concurrently and to be listed on the university’s student database as a dual degree student. Students must satisfy the credit hour requirements for each degree program. A minimum of 50 percent of the hours counted toward the credit hour requirement for each degree must be unique to that degree and cannot be used for dual credit. The Graduate Studies Committee may establish a minimum higher than 50 percent. All other respective degree requirements must be completed independently. An individual thesis or dissertation cannot be used toward degree requirements for both degrees. Examination procedures for dual degree students are similar to standard procedures, but shorter, given that the student's concentrations might have additional examination procedures.

As an interdisciplinary program, no single college or school encompasses the proposed M.A. program activities. Consequently, administrative support, record-keeping, and publicity for the program will be housed in the offices of the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS), part of the Office of International Affairs. CLAS has affiliated faculty throughout the university (see our People page for a list of affiliated faculty). 

All graduate faculty members who participate in the program through the courses they teach in their respective academic units are consulted to choose among its ranks the members of the LAS Graduate Studies Committee , which administers the program. The Graduate Studies Committee consists of five members nominated and then chosen by the Latin American Studies graduate faculty members in a way that is fully representative of its diverse disciplinary constituency. Graduate Studies Committee members serve for staggered two-year terms. The Committee deals with routine administrative matters and makes recommendations for basic policy changes as needed. The Director of CLAS chairs this committee and serves as Director of the Latin American Studies M.A. Program. CLAS administration serves as Graduate Secretary of the program.

The Director of the LAS M.A. Program and the Chair of the LAS Graduate Studies Committe will support new students during their first semester of registration and assist in the selection of an appropriate advisor. Students must designate a formal permanent advisor within the first semester of study. Thereafter, course registration should always take place in close consultation with the student’s advisor. The advisor can be replaced any time upon request by the student or the current advisor to the Graduate Studies Committee. 

In consultation with their advisor, the student will form an advisory committee. The advisory committee, which will be formed at least two semesters before graduation, will consist of at least two faculty specialists in the student’s areas of concentration. In any case, the final composition of the student’s advisory committee should be validated by the Graduate Studies Committee. Once the advisory committee has been formed, adjustments in its composition will be decided by the student in consultation with their advisor and the committee members. Appropriate notification will be made to the Graduate Studies Committee and will be recorded in the student’s file. The student’s principal advisor will chair the advisory committee. 

The advisor and the student’s advisory committee are charged with advising students in light of their career goals. Their judgement of suitable committee composition (e.g., the need for additional members), appropriate courses and/or appropriate interdisciplinary bredth of coursework beyond the minimum requirements should guide development of the student’s program. 

At the beginning of each semester, the student is required to obtain the signed approval of their advisor for the program of study for that semester. This plan of study must be authorized by the Director of Graduate Studies Committee. Advising credit will accrue to the adviser’s home department. 

Course selection and advising will take place in the context of the following considerations: 

  • Students are required to select two areas of concentration by the end of their second semester in the program. These areas of concentration could be chosen according to disciplinary boundaties; or could be designed by the student, in consultation with their advisory committee and with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee, around a specific topic approached in an interdisciplinary manner. 
  • By the end of their third semester in the program, students will choose between the thesis and non-thesis track. The thesis track entails the production of substantial research project, to be defended in an oral examination; the non-thesis track, two written examinations followed by an oral defense. 
  • Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of CLAS’ partnership with Latin American research and learning institutions. Students pursuing a thesis will be particularly encouraged to apply to applicable grants and pursue study and research abroad with specialists in their respective fields for at least one semester, preferably during the second year of studies. Advisors and the Director of the Graduate Studies Committee provide all necessary information and guide students through this process. 

The CLAS website offers a complete list of both core faculty and faculty in non-Latin American Studies disciplines who are professionally active in/with the region in some meaningful way, such as through their research, publications, collaborative projects with Latin American scholars and universities, conference presentations, study abroad programs, student and faculty exchanges, support of Latin American and/or Latinx student programs and activities. 

A comprehensive list of courses offered by different departments and programs can be found on the CLAS website. For more specific information, please contact Leila Vieira ( [email protected] ) or your advisor.

If you have questions about the M.A. in Latin American Studies program or would like more information, please contact Leila Vieira ( [email protected] ).

Universiteit Leiden

Thesis and Thesis Seminar Latin America A, sem 2

Admission requirements.

This course is only available for students in the BA International Studies who have successfully completed a Thematic Seminar course (10 ects) and who have passed courses of the first two years of the International Studies programme worth a total of 100 EC.

The student writes the thesis in the area of specialisation.

Description

This seminar will focus on history and politics in Latin America from the twentieth century to the present. Issues students will be encouraged to explore include political transitions, international relations, cultural politics, and political movements in Latin America. Our aim with such topics is to understand contemporary events in Latin America in their historical context and examine the relationship between culture, politics, and economics in the region.

Building on earlier exercises in essay-writing, in particular the essay for the second year’s Thematic Seminar course, a bachelor’s thesis is the finishing paper of the programme. It is a research paper of 10,000 words (± 10%), excluding bibliography and notes, which to a considerable extent is the result of research and writing that is independently done.

Collective supervision is provided in thesis seminars. The aim of the thesis seminar is to guide students through the process of designing a research question; collecting literature, sources, data, and other materials that are necessary for answering the question; bringing logic and persuasive order in the material and in the arguments supported by it; and designing appropriate research methods.

Assignments within the seminar include designing a research question and plan, as well as writing a literature review (ca. 2500 words).

Apart from collective supervision, students will receive individual supervision, specifically focused on the subject of their research. The thesis seminar leader is also the one who provides this individual supervision. Students will have four individual meetings with their supervisor during the semester.

Each seminar will be devoted to one of the geographical areas covered by International Studies, and will focus on a broad theme relevant to the programme.

The exact set-up of the seminars may vary somewhat, due to the nature of the area, and the teaching approach of the seminar leader. The theme of a seminar lends focus to the class discussions, and provide extra guidance for students to decide on their research topic.

Course objectives

Based on the knowledge and skills acquired, students will prove themselves to be able to:

work with research techniques that are current in the discipline(s) covered;

comprehend sophisticated academic debates;

deliver their research results in good written English (see Appendix);

work and write under time-pressure, and deal with deadlines.

The general academic skills covered by these aims are:

collect and select specialized literature using traditional and electronic methods and techniques;

analyze and evaluate this in terms of quality and reliability;

formulate a well-defined research problem based on this;

set up, under supervision, a study of limited size, taking into consideration the traditional and electronic methods and techniques relevant for the discipline;

formulate a reasoned conclusion on the basis of this;

explain research findings in writing, in a clear and well-argued way.

This course will provide an opportunity for students to write a thesis focusing on the Latin America region from a variety of disciplinary perspectives including economics, political science and history.

Essential criteria for theses

  • Contains a clear academic research question.
  • Is situated within a relevant academic debate.
  • Analyses the topic from at least two different disciplinary perspectives, and/or places the analysis of the regionally defined topic in a global perspective.
  • Accounts for the chosen research method(s) and materials.
  • Is based on the evaluation of a sufficiently large body of independently collected scholarly literature and/or sources (10-20, depending on whether books and/or articles are discussed).
  • Contains a well-structured and consistent argument.
  • Is written in correct English.
  • Produces a scholarly argument and analysis.

The timetables are available through My Timetable .

Mode of instruction

Four to six seminar class meetings of two hours, spread over the semester; four individual meetings with supervisor (30 min. on average). Class seminars and self-study research. Attendance is mandatory (you are allowed to miss a maximum of two of the six sessions).

Attending a seminar is mandatory; no thesis can be submitted that has not been written in the context of a thesis seminar. If you are unable to attend a session, please inform your lecturer in advance . If you are absent at two or more class meetings or more than one individual meeting, the lecturer may have you disenrolled from the seminar.

Assessment method

Submission of the following assignments is prerequisite for submitting your thesis :

Research question and research plan (1200-1500 words);

Literature review, extensive intro or background (ca. 2500 words);

Draft version of the Thesis.

Final Thesis (10,000 words +- 10%) excluding bibliography and notes

The grade for the thesis seminar is determined by the thesis grade.

To successfully complete this course, the grade for the thesis needs to be a 6.0 or higher.

Late submissions of the final version, without previous permission, can lead to a deduction in the grade. This is at the lecturer's discretion.

Students who score an insufficient grade for the thesis (below 6.0) are allowed to resubmit a reworked version of their thesis. The deadline for resubmission of the thesis is 10 working days after receiving the grade for the thesis and subsequent feedback. In case of resubmission of the thesis the grade will be lowered as a consequence of the longer process of completion.

Students who fail to hand in their thesis on or before the original deadline, but still within 5 working days of that deadline, will receive a grade and feedback on their thesis. This will be considered a first submission of the thesis; however, the grade will be lowered as a consequence of the longer process of completion. Students who fail to hand in their thesis on or before the original deadline, and also fail to hand in their thesis within 5 working days of that deadline, get 10 working days, counting from the original deadline, to hand in a first version of their thesis. However, this first version will count as a resubmitted thesis with consequential lowering of the grade, and there will be no option of handing in a reworked version based on feedback from the supervisor.

Reading list

Some Useful Readings

V. Bulmer-Thomas (2014) The Economic History of Latin America Since Independence, 3rd ed. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press (Ch.1)

ECLAC (2016) Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2016

ECLAC (2008) Economic Survey of Latin America and the Caribbean 2007-8 http://www.eclac.cl/publicaciones/xml/3/33873/2008-382-EEI_COMPLETO_WEB.pdf (Section V provides a neat summary of the region’s economic history from the 1940s through to the middle of the last decade.)

P. Franko (2007) The Puzzle of Latin American Economic Development, Lanham, Rowman & Littlefield (Ch. 1)

D. Green (2003) Silent Revolution: The Rise and Crisis of Market Economics in Latin America, London, Latin America Bureau (Chs. 3-4)

J. Ocampo & J. Ros (2011) (eds.) Oxford Handbook of Latin American Economics, Oxford University Press (Ch.1). Also online:

M. Reid (2014) Brazil: The Troubled Rise of a Global Power, New Haven, Yale University Press (Parts I and II)

J. Reyes & C. Sawyer (2016) Latin American Economic Development 2nd ed. Abingdon, Taylor & Francis (Ch. 2).

Registration

Registration occurs via survey only. Registration opens 15 December 2023:

1) On 15 December 2023 you will receive a message with a link to the survey. 2) Indicate there which Thesis Seminar has your preference, and your reasons for this preference. 3) Based on preferences indicated by 8 January 2024 and spots available per seminar, the Thesis Seminar Coordinator will assign you to a specific Thesis Seminar by 22 January 2024 . 4) Students will then be enrolled for the specific groups by the Administration Office. 5) All students will be enrolled for their group in Brightspace to access all course information.

Students cannot register in uSis for the Thesis Seminar, or be allowed into a Thesis Seminar in any other way.

For substantive questions, contact the lecturer listed in the right information bar.

For questions about enrolment, admission, etc, contact the Education Administration Office: Student Affairs Office for BA International Studies

No thesis can be submitted that has not been written in the context of a thesis seminar.

There are four important due dates during the seminar: in the second semester, students are to submit a research question in week 9; a literature review in week 12; a draft version of the thesis in week 18; and the definitive version in week 23 (deadline 7 June, 2024).

The due dates are not negotiable.

Since both the number of individual meetings with the supervisor, and their duration is limited, it is important that students go to them well-prepared.

Consult the Thesis Seminar Guidelines .

Free Latin America Essay Examples & Topics

Latin America is a group of countries from the South American continent. It includes Mexico, Central America, and the islands of the Caribbean, where they speak the Romance language.

Latin America presents a mixture of many cultures. African, Indigenous, and European cultures had the most impact on it. One of the examples of this mixture might be the Mexican folk music “Son.”

In this article, you’ll see methods and advice for writing a Latin America essay. You will find them helpful for creating any project related to the contemporary challenges, culture, or history. Plus, our experts have composed Latin America research topics that you can use for practice.

Latin America is diverse and fascinating to learn about. Writing an essay about it might be a pleasure, especially if you read our recommendations. They’ll help you follow the academic structure and express your point correctly.

Here are our tips on composing an essay about Latin America:

  • Don’t limit yourself. Latin America is diverse. So, try not to explore only one country in your paper. Latin America’s history is broad too. That’s why make sure to include different aspects and interesting facts.
  • Research various features. If you’ve decided to write about one country, cover different aspects of its structure, culture, etc. For example, political and economic organization. Or elaborate on traditional music and dance in one paper.
  • Start with the basics . Cover the geography, economics, or other basic information about the country or area in the introduction. The first paragraph should grab your readers’ attention. Thus, provide some facts for their knowledge in an engaging way.
  • Work on your thesis. It summarizes the main point of your essay in one statement. The thesis is the last sentence in the introduction paragraph.
  • Structure your essay well. One paper covers one message that you state in your thesis. One paragraph covers one idea that you convey in the topic sentence. Body paragraphs provide arguments and supporting evidence.
  • Write your conclusion. Restate your thesis statement here and summarize your arguments. You can achieve this with our conclusion generator . Do not make mention any new points in this part.
  • Refer to trustworthy sources. It is crucial while writing about a country’s history and culture. List them in the references, and don’t forget to cite correctly.

Interesting Latin America Essay Topics

Now, you can proceed to write your essay using our advice. The only thing you are missing is a good topic idea. You can come up with one yourself, use our topic generator , or pick one from the list below.

So, here are 23 Latin America topics you can use for your essay:

  • Latin American authors and their impact on world culture.
  • Colonialism in Latin America and its effects.
  • How does globalization affect Latin America?
  • The significance of musical instruments of Latin America.
  • The reasons behind poverty in Latin America.
  • Does religion affect Latin America’s culture?
  • Slavery abolishment in Latin America.
  • Did the American Revolution affect Latin American history?
  • How did nationalism impact Latin America?
  • Gender equality in Latin America.
  • Latin America in the Colonial Era.
  • Caribbean infrastructure and its types.
  • Why did the USA support Latin America’s independence?
  • Hispanic culture, traditions, and customs.
  • The ways people deal with crime in Latin America.
  • The imperialism’s impact on Latin America.
  • Democracy’s success and failures in Latin America.
  • Catholic Church and Christianity in Brazil, Mexico, and Peru.
  • How Cold War influenced Latin America.
  • Is the Latin American market big?
  • Catholics and Protestants in Latin America.
  • COVID-19 impact on central banks in Latin America.
  • Latin American literature and its effect on world culture.

Thanks for reading! You can find free Latin America essay examples below. They are great for learning how to provide your argumentation.

117 Best Essay Examples on Latin America

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Thesis on Latin-American Studies

Thesis is a prerequisite for students about to graduate their undergraduate and postgraduate programs. A student in the discipline of Latin American studies has to make thesis as a core project. Researchomatic provides its users with the opportunity to get the best quality research material for writing thesis on different topics in Latin American studies. This section of researchomatic has the best quality data, which the students can use to get good grades

La Malinche A Mans Scapegoat

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Comparison Of Tourism In Lima And Cusco

  • 43055 Words

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Dissertations / Theses on the topic 'Theology ; Latin America'

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Browse dissertations / theses on a wide variety of disciplines and organise your bibliography correctly.

Mancini, Mark Ryan. "Liberation theology : politics and religion in Latin America /." Click for abstract, 1997. http://library.ctstateu.edu/ccsu%5Ftheses/1498.html.

Heaney, S. E. "Contextual theology for Latin America : liberation themes in evangelical perspective." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2004. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.411215.

Nogueira, Elaine Marques. "Reclaiming the virgin birth narrative in Latin America feminist liberation theology." Master's thesis, University of Cape Town, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/11427/8196.

Johnson, George A. "Luke 4:18-21 and its relationship to liberation theology in Latin America." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1993. http://www.tren.com.

Davies, Augusto Zampini. "Amartya Sen's Capability Approach and Catholic Social Teaching in dialogue : an alliance for freedom and justice?" Thesis, University of Roehampton, 2014. https://pure.roehampton.ac.uk/portal/en/studentthesis/amartya-sen’s-capability-approach-and-catholic-social-teaching-in-dialogue(25edea38-94e9-4d46-83d0-88f03c66988e).html.

Muskus, Eddy José. "The origins and early development of liberation theology in Latin America with particular reference to Gustavo Gutiérrez." Thesis, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, 1995. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.683134.

Rodriguez, Dario Lopez. "A critical evaluation of the theology of mission of the National Evangelical Council of Peru (CONEP) from 1980 to 1992, with special reference to its understanding and practice of human rights." Thesis, Open University, 1997. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.361459.

Baker, Jillian Sarah. "Seeds of Hope, Seeds of Liberation: An Exploration of the Growth of Liberation Theology in the Philippines." Thesis, Boston College, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/2345/3090.

Holbrook, Joseph. "Catholic Student Movements in Latin America: Cuba and Brazil, 1920s to 1960s." FIU Digital Commons, 2013. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1013.

FitzGerald, Marianne Tierney. "Theology and Activism in Latin America: A Reflection on Jon Sobrino’s Christology of the Resurrection and Grassroots Organizations Protesting Gender-Based Violence." Thesis, Boston College, 2016. http://hdl.handle.net/2345/bc-ir:106787.

Hilgert, Bradley Robert. "Beyond Martyrdom: The Testimonial Voice of Ignacio Ellacuría and the Convergence of His Critical Thinking From Central America in Salvadoran Literature." The Ohio State University, 2015. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1429658235.

Pilarski, Geraldo. "Food security in Latin America and grass roots political economy an ethical approach to poverty, hunger and integral liberation /." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1998. http://www.tren.com.

Williamson, Kenneth B. "Liberation theology in the Roman Catholic Church in Latin America, 1968 to 1988: Conflicting concepts of social mission and their political context." Thesis, University of Ottawa (Canada), 1993. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/6869.

Laemers, Jeroen Willem Joseph. "Invincible ignorance and the discovery of the Americas: the history of an idea from Scotus to Suárez." Diss., University of Iowa, 2011. https://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/4674.

Mello, Alexandre Awi. "Maria-Iglesia: Madre del Pueblo Misionero - Papa Francisco y la piedad popular mariana en el contexto teologico-pastoral latino-americano (Mary-Church: Mother of the Missionary People – Pope Francis and popular Marian piety)." IMRI - Marian Library / OhioLINK, 2018. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=udmarian1549794813187077.

Valério, Mairon Escorsi 1981. "O continente pobre e católico = o discurso da teologia da libertação e a reinvenção religiosa da América Latina (1968-1992)." [s.n.], 2012. http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/280284.

Larocca, Grosso Antonio de Jesus S. M. C. "Magisterio y sentido de la fe: estudio de la relacion entre textos mariologicos del magisterio y la devocion mariana en: Latino America, Venezuela, y la Arquidiocesis de Barquisimeto." IMRI - Marian Library / OhioLINK, 2001. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=udmarian1432030143.

Carlson, Gary A. "An analysis of revolutionary Latin American liberation theology." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1991. http://www.tren.com.

Orique, David Thomas 1959. "The unheard voice of law in Bartolome de Las Casas's "Brevisima relacion de la destruicion de las Indias"." Thesis, University of Oregon, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/11616.

Sgarbossa, Lino. "Conversion the Latin American perspective /." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1991. http://www.tren.com.

Tuemler, Lisa Kay. "Developing a Wesleyan theology in the context of Latin American liberation theology." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1990. http://www.tren.com.

Grenfell, James C. "The theme of justice in Latin American liberation theology." Thesis, University of Oxford, 2000. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.365590.

Albarran, Louis. "The Face of God at the End of the Road: The Sacramentality of Jack Kerouac in Lowell, America, and Mexico." University of Dayton / OhioLINK, 2013. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1375235381.

Carroll, R. M. Daniel. "Contexts for Amos prophetic poetics in Latin American perspective /." Sheffield : JSOT Press, 1992. http://site.ebrary.com/id/10250999.

Drapkin, Leah. "Latin American Liberation Theology: Did it Liberate? The Emergence and Development of Latin American Liberation Theology, Its Ability to Liberate, & Its Future." Wittenberg University Honors Theses / OhioLINK, 2010. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=wuhonors1338488029.

Lee, Hong Jei. "The comparative study of the Christology in Latin American liberation theology and Korean Minjung theology." Thesis, University of Glasgow, 1990. http://theses.gla.ac.uk/2397/.

Carroll, R. Mark Daniel. "Contexts for Amos prophetic poetics in Latin American perspective /." Sheffield : JSOT Press, 1992. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/api/volumes/oclc/25590594.html.

Saviano, Brigitte. "Pastoral urbana: Herausforderungen für eine Grossstadtpastoral in Metropolen und Megastädten Lateinamerikas /." Berlin : Lit, 2006. http://bvbr.bib-bvb.de:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=BVB01&doc_number=014825716&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA.

Rodriguez, Hector. "The liberation of Israel from Egypt and its implications in Latin American theology." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 1987. http://www.tren.com.

Gladwin, Ryan Redding. "Towards a liberating Latin American ecclesiology : the local church as a socially and culturally transformative historical project." Thesis, University of Edinburgh, 2014. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/18007.

Scheuren, Acevedo Sonia M. "The Opposition to Latin American Liberation Theology and the Transformation of Christianity, 1960-1990." FIU Digital Commons, 2016. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2454.

Tarango, Yolanda. "Latina narratives creating meaning through story /." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 2004. http://www.tren.com.

Fanta, Thomas G. "Proclaiming what we have seen and heard| Preaching the developing world mission experience in the first world." Thesis, Aquinas Institute of Theology, 2015. http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/#viewpdf?dispub=3685863.

This project offers a resource for the training of lay preachers from the first world who have participated in mission trips to the developing world of El Salvador. The project further enhances the experience of the mission trip by giving mission participants the tools to proclaim the gospel in light of their mission experience. Chapter One explores the unique political, economic, religious and cultural realities of the mission territory of El Salvador. Chapter Two examines the spiritual history of the missionaries themselves within the culture of the United States, exploring the various spiritual movements that have shaped their nation. Liberation Theology and its impact on the people of El Salvador and the United States will be discussed in Chapter Three. Its profound impact on lay spirituality and their understanding of the scriptures will also be examined. Chapter Four outlines four preparation meetings for missionaries as well as the spiritual agenda for the mission trip to El Salvador. In Chapter Five, eleven key points for effective preaching will be offered in a description of a workshop to be given to returning missionaries to enable them to proclaim what they have seen and heard on their mission trip. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of this workshop as well as sample homilies will also be presented in this chapter. The project concludes with reflections on the benefits of missionary preaching for both the missionaries and their sponsoring communities.

Eaton, Ramírez Helen-May. "Speaking of liberation, the emancipatory limits of Gustavo Gutiérrez's liberation theology for Latin American women." Thesis, National Library of Canada = Bibliothèque nationale du Canada, 1998. http://www.collectionscanada.ca/obj/s4/f2/dsk1/tape11/PQDD_0021/NQ41423.pdf.

FILHO, MANOEL BERNARDINO DE SANTANA. "EVENT WORD AND LIBERATION PRAXIS: KARL BARTH’S ECCLESIOLOGY AND HIS CONTRIBUTION TO LATIN-AMERICAN THEOLOGY." PONTIFÍCIA UNIVERSIDADE CATÓLICA DO RIO DE JANEIRO, 2012. http://www.maxwell.vrac.puc-rio.br/Busca_etds.php?strSecao=resultado&nrSeq=19660@1.

Lamola, Malesela John. "The poverty of a theology of the poor : an Althusserian exposure of the philosophical basis of Latin-American theology of liberation." Thesis, University of Edinburgh, 1991. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/28396.

Vigário, Jacqueline Siqueira. "Diante da sacralidade humana: produção e apropriações do moderno em Nazareno Confaloni (1950-1977)." Universidade Federal de Goiás, 2017. http://repositorio.bc.ufg.br/tede/handle/tede/8519.

O’Neil, Sean S. "Thinking in the Spirit: The Emergence of Latin American Pentecostal Scholars and Their Theology of Social Concern." Ohio University / OhioLINK, 2003. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ohiou1070640885.

Trinidad, Mario. "A descriptive study of Latin American Christology the Christologies of Leonardo Boff and Jon Sobrino /." Theological Research Exchange Network (TREN), 2005. http://www.tren.com.

Gong, Liren. "Christian discipleship today : a study of the ethics of the kingdom in the theologies of Stanley Hauerwas and Jon Sobrino." Thesis, University of Glasgow, 1994. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.388188.

Wortham, George Marvin. "A study of the theme of justice in the theology of Reinhold Niebuhr in critical comparison with the theology of select Latin American liberation theologians." Thesis, University of Edinburgh, 1990. http://hdl.handle.net/1842/30947.

Núñez-Coba, Milton. "A critical assessment of the theology of Camilo Torres in the light of Latin American theology : a theological paradigm for peace with justice for Colombia." Thesis, University of St Andrews, 2015. http://hdl.handle.net/10023/6557.

Junges, Fábio César. "Teologia desde a América Latina: interpretação das fissuras históricas com pretensão de verdade, em diálogo com Theodor W. Adorno." Faculdades EST, 2015. http://tede.est.edu.br/tede/tde_busca/arquivo.php?codArquivo=622.

Irvine, Melissa. "Transforming the Religious Paradigm: A Study of Female Opportunism and Empowerment Through Latin American Evangelicalism." Scholarship @ Claremont, 2011. http://scholarship.claremont.edu/cmc_theses/218.

ALVES, ANTONIO APARECIDO. "FAITH AND POLITICS FORMATION SCHOOLS: A THEOLOGICAL STUDY BASED ON THE SOCIAL TEACHING OF THE CHURCH AND IN LATIN AMERICAN THEOLOGY." PONTIFÍCIA UNIVERSIDADE CATÓLICA DO RIO DE JANEIRO, 2010. http://www.maxwell.vrac.puc-rio.br/Busca_etds.php?strSecao=resultado&nrSeq=15625@1.

Costello, Damian M. "Honor and Caritas: Bartolomé De Las Casas, Soldiers of Fortune, and the Conquest of the Americas." University of Dayton / OhioLINK, 2013. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=dayton1375380700.

Lima, Ricardo Barros. "ORLANDO COSTAS: ENSAIOS NO CAMINHO PARA UMA PASTORAL EVANGÉLICA LATINO-AMERICANA." Universidade Metodista de São Paulo, 2008. http://tede.metodista.br/jspui/handle/tede/487.

KUZMA, CESAR AUGUSTO. "THE FUTURE OF GOD IN THE MISSION OF CHRISTIAN HOPE: A STUDY OF ESCHATOLOGY IN THE THEOLOGY OF HOPE BY JURGEN MOLTMANN IN APPROXIMATION WITH THE LATIN AMERICAN THEOLOGY OF LIBERATION IN THE CURRENT CONTEXT." PONTIFÍCIA UNIVERSIDADE CATÓLICA DO RIO DE JANEIRO, 2012. http://www.maxwell.vrac.puc-rio.br/Busca_etds.php?strSecao=resultado&nrSeq=19888@1.

Souza, Ezequiel de. "Entre a dependência e a libertação: mudanças epistemológicas na teologia latino-americana a partir da apropriação da teoria da dependência pela teologia da libertação." Faculdades EST, 2015. http://tede.est.edu.br/tede/tde_busca/arquivo.php?codArquivo=640.

Pratt, Aaron, and Aaron Pratt. "On the Concept of Sin in the Theology of Liberation and Josiah Royce's The Problem of Christianity: Towards a Theo-Philosophical Ethics." Thesis, University of Oregon, 2012. http://hdl.handle.net/1794/12454.

Tuesday, February 20, 2024

Other Calendars

Event topics.

The LACS Graduate Lecture Series
  • 10:00am To – 11:00am

H.J. Patterson Hall

image of Maryland Campus Placeholder

LACS graduate students Víctor Hernández-Sang (PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology) and Marco Polo Juárez Cruz (PhD candidate in Art History) will present their dissertation research. Breakfast will be provided!

Víctor Hernández-Sang "Music, Race, and Community Organizing in the Dominican Republic"

Marco Polo Juárez Cruz "Experimentation and Intermediality in the 1960s Mexico City's Artistic Scene"

In an era where critical knowledge is facing scrutiny, and the study of Latin America and the Caribbean has evolved into a more intricate, interconnected endeavor, the LACS Graduate Lecture Series seeks to highlight the cutting-edge research and innovative ideas cultivated by our graduate students. Throughout these monthly lectures, LACS graduate students will assert their roles as professionally trained scholars, providing insights into their work and offering glimpses into its future potential. The objective is to inspire and motivate the academic community, prompting thoughtful reflection on governmental policies and budget allocations, and fostering the advancements of Latin American and Caribbean studies and its community.

H.J. Patterson Hall room 2118.

Latin American Studies Center

For disability accommodations, please contact Eric Tomalá at [email protected]

Schools and Units

Latin American Studies | Home

DEADLINE: 2024 CLASP K–12 Educator Teaching Award | Call for Applications

CLASP Call for Applications for K12 Educator Award

The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) is now accepting applications for its biennial “ CLASP Teaching Award for K–12 Educators .” The award recognizes excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean by elementary, middle, and high school teachers. CLASP proudly honors teachers who have demonstrated continued dedication to developing an engaging and dynamic portrait of Latin America that goes beyond the textbook. Teachers of any subject at the K-12 level are eligible to apply.

Applications will be reviewed and evaluated for teaching skills, development of innovative teaching materials and strategies, leadership, and professional development accomplishments.

Application Materials

Online application form , which includes the following supporting materials:

  • (a) Resume or C.V.
  • (b) Evidence of how applicant has integrated Latin American and/or Caribbean content into their classes, including their approach to the teaching of Latin America and how it has helped students attain the goals of the class (1–2 pages) 
  • (c) Other documentation (e.g., excerpts from lesson plans, student work, professional development presentation) (optional, but strongly encouraged). 

A 1–2-page letter of recommendation from a colleague (peer or supervisor)  providing evidence of the following: 

  • Outstanding teaching effectiveness, including methods and student successes stories 
  • Innovation/creativity in the presentation of Latin American/Caribbean content 
  • Involvement in professional development and/or community engagement related to Latin America and/or the Caribbean (i.e., the applicant seeks opportunities to learn about/engage with the region)

Application materials must be submitted by February 25, 2024.

Apply here .

Submit letter of recommendation here . 

The award recipient will be announced in late May 2024 and will be awarded a $500 cash prize.

Questions about this award should be directed to Molly Aufdermauer at [email protected]

Applicants’ names, email addresses, and school affiliations will be added to the CLASP email listserv, which is used to announce professional development opportunities and teaching resources offered by CLASP and/or its member institutions. Selected applicants’ curriculum materials may be incorporated (with permission) into a CLASP database of K-12 resources.

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COMMENTS

  1. Latin American Studies Dissertations and Theses

    A Woman's Place: The Cuban Revolution and Gender Inequality in the Home . Ross, April Kathleen (University of Kansas, 2003-05-31) This thesis is an empirical study of changes in Cuban women's public and private lives from the 1959 Revolution to 1990. It describes the colonial gender ideology that has influenced present-day male and female ...

  2. Senior Thesis Titles

    Senior Thesis Titles. Bringing together the insights gleaned through the course of one's studies, the completion of a thesis in a student's major discipline on a Latin American or Caribbean topic is one of the capstone experiences of the undergraduate certificate program. Below, you can get a sense of the impressive and broad-ranging ...

  3. Latin American Studies

    Field Worksheet: Latin American Studies: Global Health Sophomore essay topic: The U.S. public health campaign during the Panama Canal's construction Junior essay topic: The Bolivian film Yawar Malku and the Peace Corps in 1960s Bolivia Senior thesis title: Tracing Trauma: Discourses and Narratives of Experience in Post-Conflict Peru

  4. 80 Latin American Studies Research Topics

    For students embarking on the journey of thesis or dissertation research, selecting the right Latin American Studies research topics can be both exhilarating and daunting. Latin American Studies, an interdisciplinary field that delves into the rich cultures, histories, politics, and socio-economic landscapes of Latin America and the Caribbean ...

  5. Latin American Research Review (LARR)

    The Latin American Research Review (LARR) is the flagship journal of the Latin American Studies Association, in continuous publication since 1965. LARR publishes original research and review essays on Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latina/Latino studies. The journal covers the social sciences and the humanities, including the fields of ...

  6. Thinking about Topics

    Exploring broad topics in recent Latin American Studies scholarship is a good way to start thinking about potential topics for your essay, research paper, or project. As you explore some of the broad topics in recent scholarship, consider: What are the expectations around the essay, paper, or project?

  7. PDF Latin American Studies

    elective courses on Latin American topics or pursue a minor or a B.A. degree in Latin American Studies. At the graduate level, they can work on Latin America through interdisci-plinary master's programs or through doctoral programs in academic departments. •Latin American Studies integrates teaching, research, and policy analysis ...

  8. Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies Subject Guide

    Exploring Broad Topics in Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies; Narrowing Topics in Latina/o, Caribbean, and Latin American Studies; Forming a Research Question; Finding Primary Sources; Finding Secondary Sources; ... For many essays and projects, forming a research question and thesis statement is an important next step.

  9. Thesis

    The thesis is the capstone of the Latin American Studies major and, given the nature of the program, an interdisciplinary project. It should build on what you have learned in your coursework about Latin America, its history, its culture, its relation to other parts of the world, and the issues that constitute its present reality.

  10. Exploring Broad Topics in Latina/o, Caribbean, & Latin American Studies

    Exploring broad topics in recent Latin American Studies scholarship is a good way to start thinking about potential topics for your essay, research paper, or project. As you explore some of the broad topics in recent scholarship, consider: What are the expectations around the essay, paper, or project?

  11. Dissertations & Theses

    OATD.org aims to be the best possible resource for finding open access graduate theses and dissertations published around the world. Metadata (information about the theses) comes from over 1000 colleges, universities, and research institutions.

  12. PDF Thesis Guidelines Latin American Studies Program

    defense of the thesis before the members of the thesis committee. Thesis Topics The first step is to choose a research topic. A thesis is supposed to represent an original contribution to scholarship in your area of research. Students should develop a thesis topic in consultation with the LAS graduate advisor or a LAS faculty member.

  13. Latin American Studies

    Students whose thesis cannot be devoted to a Latin American or Brazilian topic may complete the program requirements either by writing a research paper of sufficient complexity and length to substitute for the thesis requirement (the topic should be determined in consultation with the director and relevant program faculty) or by taking an ...

  14. Handbook of Latin American Studies (HLAS): A Resource Guide

    The Handbook of Latin American Studies (HLAS) has been published since the mid-1930s. ... Some volumes also included occasional essays on specific topics such as "Treaties, Conventions, International Acts, Protocols, and Agreements" (volumes 4 through 9), "Latin American Studies in Scandinavia" (volume 22), and "Materials in the United States ...

  15. Latin American Studies (Master 2021-2022)

    In the master's programme in Latin American Studies at Leiden University you will focus on key social, political, linguistic and cultural developments which are currently shaping the complex reality of Latin America. ... The methodological seminar helps the student to discide on their thesis topic and prepare the research project. From mid ...

  16. Latin American Research Paper Topics

    Here are the best 120 Latin American research topics that you can consider. Mixed Latin American Research Paper Topics. A closer look at the history of the church and human rights in Latin America. An in-depth analysis of Latin American feminist theology. Exploring the women's rights in Latin America: A case study of Peru and Colombia.

  17. BA in Latin American Studies » Academics

    The committee will consider both the thesis and the result of the oral examination to determine whether the student will receive honors in the major. ... students are also required to complete cocurricular activities that expand their understanding of their research topic. Latin American Studies majors may earn principal course credit for CAS ...

  18. MA in Latin American Studies

    Welcome! The Center for Latin American Studies houses the interdisciplinary Master's degree in Latin American Studies. Our students benefit from working with faculty from various disciplines and from creating a degree plan tailored to their research interests. In addition to the information contained in the Graduate School Handbook, our ...

  19. Thesis and Thesis Seminar Latin America A, sem 2

    Our aim with such topics is to understand contemporary events in Latin America in their historical context and examine the relationship between culture, politics, and economics in the region. Building on earlier exercises in essay-writing, in particular the essay for the second year's Thematic Seminar course, a bachelor's thesis is the ...

  20. Free Latin America Essay Examples & Topic Ideas

    Free Latin America Essay Examples & Topics. Latin America is a group of countries from the South American continent. It includes Mexico, Central America, and the islands of the Caribbean, where they speak the Romance language. Latin America presents a mixture of many cultures. African, Indigenous, and European cultures had the most impact on it ...

  21. Latin American & Latino Studies Program Graduate Student Research Award

    The Latin American and Latino Studies program at the U of A is funding three awards up to $1,500 each to fund research in Latin America or research related to Latina/o Studies and/or conference travel. The student will need to provide an abstract of research goals and, in the case of a conference ...

  22. Free Latin-American Studies Thesis & Thesis topics

    Thesis on Latin-American Studies. Thesis is a prerequisite for students about to graduate their undergraduate and postgraduate programs. A student in the discipline of Latin American studies has to make thesis as a core project. Researchomatic provides its users with the opportunity to get the best quality research material for writing thesis ...

  23. Honors Thesis and Undergraduate Prizes

    We envision the honors thesis as an intellectually challenging and rewarding experience, a capstone to four years of undergraduate studies. The honors thesis ought to be an original contribution in the field chosen by the student, though the research, writing, and critical thinking skills honed through the project bear fruits whatever the professional path the student takes in the future.

  24. Dissertations / Theses: 'Theology ; Latin America'

    Most leaders of the Church in Latin America, and the Vatican, found the most extreme of the liberation proposals to be unacceptable, both in relation to basic concepts of the role of the Church in social mission and in relation to the partisan political commitment proposed in Latin America. This thesis examines the ensuing conflict over ...

  25. University of Maryland Calendar

    LACS graduate students Víctor Hernández-Sang (PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology) and Marco Polo Juárez Cruz (PhD candidate in Art History) will present their dissertation research. Breakfast will be provided! Víctor Hernández-Sang "Music, Race, and Community Organizing in the Dominican Republic" Marco Polo Juárez Cruz "Experimentation and Intermediality in the 1960s Mexico City's Artistic ...

  26. DEADLINE: CLAS Scholarships Applications

    Center for Latin American Studies P.O. Box 21015813, Marshall Building Suite 280 University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721. Contact Us [email protected] 520-626-7242

  27. What is Happening in Latin America? Join the Conversation Monday

    Ryan is an associate professor of comparative politics and Latin American & Latino studies. He is the recipient of a number of teaching awards, including the Fulbright College Master Teacher Award (1996) and the university-wide Dr. John and Mrs. Lois Imhoff Award for Outstanding Teaching and Student Mentorship (2011).

  28. DEADLINE: 2024 CLASP K-12 Educator Teaching Award

    The Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP) is now accepting applications for its biennial " CLASP Teaching Award for K-12 Educators."The award recognizes excellence and innovation in the teaching of Latin America and/or the Caribbean by elementary, middle, and high school teachers.