How to Create a Research Poster

  • Poster Basics
  • Design Tips
  • Logos & Images

What is a Research Poster?

Posters are widely used in the academic community, and most conferences include poster presentations in their program.  Research posters summarize information or research concisely and attractively to help publicize it and generate discussion. 

The poster is usually a mixture of a brief text mixed with tables, graphs, pictures, and other presentation formats. At a conference, the researcher stands by the poster display while other participants can come and view the presentation and interact with the author.

What Makes a Good Poster?

  • Important information should be readable from about 10 feet away
  • Title is short and draws interest
  • Word count of about 300 to 800 words
  • Text is clear and to the point
  • Use of bullets, numbering, and headlines make it easy to read
  • Effective use of graphics, color and fonts
  • Consistent and clean layout
  • Includes acknowledgments, your name and institutional affiliation

A Sample of a Well Designed Poster

View this poster example in a web browser .  

Three column blue and white poster with graphs, data, and other information displayed.

Image credit: Poster Session Tips by [email protected], via Penn State

Where do I begin?

Answer these three questions:.

  • What is the most important/interesting/astounding finding from my research project?
  • How can I visually share my research with conference attendees? Should I use charts, graphs, photos, images?
  • What kind of information can I convey during my talk that will complement my poster?

What software can I use to make a poster?

A popular, easy-to-use option. It is part of Microsoft Office package and is available on the library computers in rooms LC337 and LC336. ( Advice for creating a poster with PowerPoint ).

Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and InDesign

Feature-rich professional software that is good for posters including lots of high-resolution images, but they are more complex and expensive.  NYU Faculty, Staff, and Students can access and download the Adobe Creative Suite .

Open Source Alternatives 

  • OpenOffice is the free alternative to MS Office (Impress is its PowerPoint alternative).
  • Inkscape and Gimp are alternatives to Adobe products.
  • For charts and diagrams try Gliffy or Lovely Charts .
  • A complete list of free graphics software .

A Sample of a Poorly Designed Poster

View this bad poster example in a browser.

Poster marked up pointing out errors, of which there are many.

Image Credit: Critique by Better Posters

  • Next: Design Tips >>
  • Last Updated: Jul 11, 2023 5:09 PM
  • URL: https://guides.nyu.edu/posters

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois Library Wordmark

Research Posters : Step by step

  • Elements of a poster
  • Step by step
  • Visualizations & images
  • Illinois logo
  • Archiving - Grad Students
  • More Resources
  • Oral Presentations
  • 2023 Undergraduate Research Symposium This link opens in a new window

CREATING YOUR POSTER

You have two choices when creating a research poster:

  • You can create your poster from scratch by using PowerPoint, Adobe InDesign, or a similar design program. 
  • You can use one of the  University of Illinois Research Poster Templates .

Sizing your Poster

  • If you are presenting for the  Undergraduate Research Symposium , resize your slide to width 48 inches by height 36 inches.
  • If you are presenting at a  professional conference , your instructions should indicate the size limits of your poster. Standard U.S. conference poster size is 48" by 36". 

​ ***IMPORTANT: You must change the size of your slide before you start working on your poster. This will ensure that your images and text do not become pixilated when the poster is printed. See below for specific instructions. 

How to correctly size your poster in PowerPoint:

  • Select the "Design" tab
  • Click "Slide Size"
  • Select "Page Setup"
  • Under the "Slides sized for:" dropdown menu, select "Custom"
  • Set the "Width" and "Height" to what is needed for your poster
  • Click "OK" 

How to edit PowerPoint slide size image

How to correctly size your poster in Adobe InDesign:

When a new document is created in Adobe InDesign, a dialogue box prompts you to enter dimensions:

screenshot of Adobe InDesign create a document menu

  • Change the dimension metric to inches from the drop down box.
  • Margins are intentional space from an object to the edge of the poster, intended not to be trimmed. You can set this to 0 inches on all sides unless you have a specific plan to use margins in your design.
  • Bleed shows the printer where to trim white space that occurs when printing color onto white poster paper. If you are printing your poster, include at least a 0.25 inch bleed on each side; remember not to place any content in the bleed as it will be trimmed by the printer.
  • Slug is a space for the creator to leave any notes for the printer. You can set this to 0 inches unless you have notes. 

If you ever want to change your poster dimensions after starting the poster, you can do so through the Document Setup Menu .

Using multiple font styles can really make your poster stand out and look professional. Consult this graphic to understand different font styles, what fonts work best together, and what fonts to avoid.

COLOR SCHEME CHOICES

Sticking to a color scheme can help your poster look professional. Consistent use of color can help your viewer understand how information is organized on your poster. Not sure where to start with color?

  • Pick colors from an image (including a custom one you're planning to use on your poster)
  • Use Illinois branding colors

Not sure what to do with the hex code from a brand guide or color palette generator?

  • Adobe InDesign

Always check that your text is accessible on background colors using WebAIM's free contrast checker.

If printing your poster, it's a good idea to do a small-scale test print of your poster before getting it printed. Colors often appear brighter and more vibrant on a screen than when printed. There still might be some variation in color depending on the color scale the printer uses, but it will be a closer match on paper than what you see on screen.

WHAT TO INCLUDE IN YOUR POSTER

All posters MUST have:  

  • Title: Make it catchy and use at least 72 pt. font. 
  • Your name and contact information.
  • Institutional affiliation, see the  Illinois logo  tab above.

You many also include:

  • Research question or hypothesis: Do not copy your abstract if it is included in the program. 
  • Methodology: What is the research process that you used? Explain how you did your research.
  • Your interview questions.
  • Observations: What did you see? Why is this important?
  • Findings: What did you learn? Summarize your conclusions.
  • Themes: Pull out themes in the literature and list in bullet points.
  • Consider a brief narrative of what you learned - what was the most interesting/surprising aspect of your project?
  • Add interesting quotes from your research.
  • Data: Use your data to generate charts or tables.
  • Images: Include images (visit the  Visualization & Images  tab in the guide for more information). Take your own or legally use others.
  • Recommendations and/or next steps for future research.
  • Citations: Only list 3-5 on your poster. If you have more, put them on your handout.
  • Acknowledgements: Don't forget to thank your advisor, department, or funding agency.

More helpful tips

  • Read Colin Purrington's suggestions for successful poster design.
  • Be creative in your display, think beyond the text of your paper. You can use boxes, formatting, font, and images to break up the sections of your research poster.
  • Think carefully about your title. If you would like a longer, more descriptive title, consider a subtitle. Brainstorm several titles and have a peer/colleague/friend/teacher rank them. The title needs to highlight your subject matter, but it does not need to state all your conclusions. Some good titles simply ask questions, others answer them.
  • You can section your poster according to the major points about your research you want to convey. For example: title, abstract, methodology, data, results, and conclusion. Consider the flow of your poster--these should be in a logical, easy-to-read order. Remember that most people read from left to right and top to bottom.
  • Qualitative data (e.g. quotes from references and/or interviews) can also be shared on your poster. Make sure you include captions, legends, annotations, citations, and footnotes, if necessary.
  • Design your poster as if you were designing for a professional publication. Be consistent with your layout, color choices, fonts and sizes.
  • All text of your poster should be *at least* 24 font size and an easy-to-read font style (e.g. Arial or Verdana). Anything smaller is too difficult to read.
  • Remember the “KISS Principle”: Keep It Simple, Stupid! In succinct, brief, jargon-free terms, your poster must explain: 1) the scientific problem in mind (what’s the question?), 2) its significance (why should we care?), 3) how your particular experiment addresses the problem (what’s your strategy?), 4) the experiments performed (what did you actually do?), 5) the results obtained (what did you actually find?), 6) the conclusions (what do you think it all means?), and, optionally, 7) caveats (any reservations?) and/or 8) future prospects (where do you go from here?).
  • What is the number one mistake made in poster presentations? Too much information! Try to keep your poster to the point and and clear. You can always include more information in your handout or on a website.
  • << Previous: Examples
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  • Last Updated: Nov 8, 2023 3:52 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.illinois.edu/poster

Student presenter at SURPS

Make a Good Poster

Main navigation.

Your poster is a visual aid to use while you present your work and a way to guide an audience through your project.

Page Overview

Tips for creating poster content, design tips, poster requirements.

Create and present your poster as if you were telling a story!

  • The scope of many projects is too large to fit into a single good poster--it's all about editing the story you want to tell. Hear from one presenter about this process:
“ To make my poster, I started by thinking about my art, which was the ready-made outcome of my project. I had all kinds of art: pencil sketches in my journal, acrylic disasters, marker drawings, graphic design pieces, and a whole variety of finished and unfinished pen and ink pieces. I knew I couldn’t include all of it. For instance, even though I had some graphic design pieces I really liked, I chose not to include them because I decided my poster would function better as a snapshot of my summer project, instead of as a summary .” — Major Grant Awardee 2017, ASURPS Presenter 2018
  • Even if your project is something that could be described with text alone, try to think about what visuals would be interesting and helpful for your audience.
  • Sometimes presenting a snapshot of your work can give the audience a more concrete understanding of what you did.

Picture of Cake, Drawing by Shannen Torres

Content is important but style is often what attracts your audience.

  • Use your design to guide your audience through the information. Try to create something eye catching, but easy to read.
  • Use the center of your poster to display something visually interesting - perhaps an important image, a schematic of the project or a model of how all your data fits together.
  • Consider using your section headings to make a statement - instead of “Results” try creating a short statement about the overall findings in each section of the poster. This makes every piece of text effective.
  • Pick a simple color scheme that works well with the images you have chosen or figures you have created.

Check out examples of past posters and a video with design tips!  This content is available to the Stanford Community only.

FOR ALL POSTERS:

  • Students should review our  Make a Good Poster  page for content guidance.
  • Dimensions of your poster: 42 inches (wide) by 36 inches (height).
  • To do this, create a new slide show and add a new slide by choosing “New Slide” from the “Insert” menu.
  • To change the dimensions of this slide to poster size, select “Page Setup” from the “File” Menu. Then change the width to 42 inches and height to 36 inches.
  • If you are submitting your poster with your application for printing, save the final poster in .pdf format and submit the PDF version.
  • The file size should not exceed 5 megabytes.

FOR IN-PERSON PRESENTATIONS:

  • If you are applying to present in-person, Undergraduate Research will print your poster free of charge  if your poster is submitted with your application .
  • The computer connected to the plotter is a PC. If you are working on a Mac, check your file on a PC before submitting to ensure your fonts and images appear correctly.
  • We will only be able to print your poster once.
  • Posters on foamcore will not be mountable or presentable at SURPS/ASURPS.
  • Posters which do not adhere to the above 42x36 guidelines will not be mountable or presentable at SURPS/ASURPS.
  • Lathrop Library
  • PhD Posters

Creating a Poster

What exactly is a poster presentation.

A poster presentation combines text and graphics to present your project in a way that is visually interesting and accessible. It allows you to display your work to a large group of other scholars and to talk to and receive feedback from interested viewers.

Poster sessions have been very common in the sciences for some time, and they have recently become more popular as forums for the presentation of research in other disciplines like the social sciences, service learning, the humanities, and the arts.

Poster presentation formats differ from discipline to discipline, but in every case, a poster should clearly articulate what you did, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What goals should I keep in mind as I construct my poster?

  • Clarity of content. You will need to decide on a small number of key points that you want your viewers to take away from your presentation, and you will need to articulate those ideas clearly and concisely.
  • Visual interest and accessibility. You want viewers to notice and take interest in your poster so that they will pause to learn more about your project, and you will need the poster’s design to present your research in a way that is easy for those viewers to make sense of it.

Who will be viewing my poster?

The answer to this question depends upon the context in which you will be presenting your poster. If you are presenting at a conference in your field, your audience will likely contain mostly people who will be familiar with the basic concepts you’re working with, field-specific terminology, and the main debates facing your field and informing your research. This type of audience will probably most interested in clear, specific accounts of the what and the how of your project.

If you are presenting in a setting where some audience members may not be as familiar with your area of study, you will need to explain more about the specific debates that are current in your field and to define any technical terms you use. This audience will be less interested in the specific details and more interested in the what and why of your project—that is, your broader motivations for the project and its impact on their own lives.

How do I narrow my project and choose what to put on my poster?

Probably less than you would like! One of the biggest pitfalls of poster presentations is filling your poster with so much text that it overwhelms your viewers and makes it difficult for them to tell which points are the most important. Viewers should be able to skim the poster from several feet away and easily make out the most significant points.

The point of a poster is not to list every detail of your project. Rather, it should explain the value of your research project. To do this effectively, you will need to determine your take-home message. What is the single most important thing you want your audience to understand, believe, accept, or do after they see your poster?

Once you have an idea about what that take-home message is, support it by adding some details about what you did as part of your research, how you did it, why you did it, and what it contributes to your field and the larger field of human knowledge.

What kind of information should I include about what I did?

This is the raw material of your research: your research questions, a succinct statement of your project’s main argument (what you are trying to prove), and the evidence that supports that argument. In the sciences, the what of a project is often divided into its hypothesis and its data or results. In other disciplines, the what is made up of a claim or thesis statement and the evidence used to back it up.

Remember that your viewers won’t be able to process too much detailed evidence; it’s your job to narrow down this evidence so that you’re providing the big picture. Choose a few key pieces of evidence that most clearly illustrate your take-home message. Often a chart, graph, table, photo, or other figure can help you distill this information and communicate it quickly and easily.

What kind of information should I include about how I did it?

Include information about the process you followed as you conducted your project. Viewers will not have time to wade through too many technical details, so only your general approach is needed. Interested viewers can ask you for details.

What kind of information should I include about why I did it?

Give your audience an idea about your motivation for this project. What real-world problems or questions prompted you to undertake this project? What field-specific issues or debates influenced your thinking? What information is essential for your audience to be able to understand your project and its significance? In some disciplines, this information appears in the background or rationale section of a paper.

What kind of information should I include about its contribution ?

Help your audience to see what your project means for you and for them. How do your findings impact scholars in your field and members of the broader intellectual community? In the sciences, this information appears in the discussion section of a paper.

How will the wording of my ideas on my poster be different from my research paper?

In general, you will need to simplify your wording. Long, complex sentences are difficult for viewers to absorb and may cause them to move on to the next poster. Poster verbiage must be concise, precise, and straightforward. And it must avoid jargon. Here is an example:

Wording in a paper: This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful wheelchair pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system.

Wording on a poster:

Aims of study

  • Define the ideal wheelchair pressure mapping system
  • Design a new system to meet these specifications

Once I have decided what to include, how do I actually design my poster?

The effectiveness of your poster depends on how quickly and easily your audience can read and interpret it, so it’s best to make your poster visually striking. You only have a few seconds to grab attention as people wander past your poster; make the most of those seconds!

How are posters usually laid out?

In general, people expect information to flow left-to-right and top-to-bottom. Viewers are best able to absorb information from a poster with several columns that progress from left to right.

Even within these columns, however, there are certain places where viewers’ eyes naturally fall first and where they expect to find information.

Imagine your poster with an upside-down triangle centered from the top to the bottom. It is in this general area that people tend to look first and is often used for the title, results, and conclusions. Secondary and supporting information tend to fall to the sides, with the lower right having the more minor information such as acknowledgements (including funding), and personal contact information.

thesis poster examples

  • Main Focus Area Location of research fundamentals: Title, Authors, Institution, Abstract, Results, Conclusion
  • Secondary Emphasis Location of important info: Intro, Results or Findings, Summary
  • Supporting Area Location of supporting info: Methods, Discussion
  • Final Info Area Location of supplemental info: References, Acknowledgments

How much space should I devote to each section?

This will depend on the specifics of your project. In general, remember that how much space you devote to each idea suggests how important that section is. Make sure that you allot the most space to your most important points.

How much white space should I leave on my poster?

White space is helpful to your viewers; it delineates different sections, leads the eye from one point to the next, and keeps the poster from being visually overwhelming. In general, leave 10—30% of your poster as white space.

Should I use graphics?

Absolutely! Visual aids are one of the most effective ways to make your poster visually striking, and they are often a great way to communicate complex information straightforwardly and succinctly. If your project deals with lots of empirical data, your best bet will be a chart, graph, or table summarizing that data and illustrating how that data confirms your hypothesis.

If you don’t have empirical data, you may be able to incorporate photographs, illustrations, annotations, or other items that will pique your viewers’ interest, communicate your motivation, demonstrate why your project is particularly interesting or unique.

Don’t incorporate visual aids just for the sake of having a pretty picture on your poster. The visual aids should contribute to your overall message and convey some piece of information that your viewers wouldn’t otherwise get just from reading your poster’s text.

How can I make my poster easy to read?

There are a number of tricks you can use to aid readability and emphasize crucial ideas. In general:

  • Use a large font. Don’t make the text smaller in order to fit more onto the poster. Make sure that 95% of the text on your poster can be read from 4 feet away. If viewers can’t make out the text from a distance, they’re likely to walk away.
  • Choose a sans-serif font like Helvetica or Verdana, not a serif font, like Times New Roman. Sans-serif fonts are easier to read because they don’t have extraneous hooks on every letter. Here is an example of a sans-serif and a serif font:
  • Once you have chosen a font, be consistent in its usage. Use just one font.
  • Don’t single-space your text. Use 1.5- or double-spacing to make the text easier to read.

For main points:

  • Use bold, italicized, or colored fonts, or enclose text in boxes. Save this kind of emphasis for only a few key words, phrases, or sentences. Too much emphasized text makes it harder, not easier, to locate important points.
  • AVOID USING ALL CAPITAL LETTERS, WHICH CAN BE HARD TO READ.
  • Make your main points easy to find by setting them off with bullets or numbers.

What is my role as the presenter of my poster?

When you are standing in front of your poster, you—and what you choose to say—are as important as the actual poster. Be ready to talk about your project, answer viewers’ questions, provide additional details about your project, and so on.

How should I prepare for my presentation?

Once your poster is finished, you should re-familiarize yourself with the larger project you’re presenting. Remind yourself about those details you ended up having to leave out of the poster, so that you will be able to bring them up in discussions with viewers. Then, practice, practice, practice!

Show your poster to advisors, professors, friends, and classmates before the day of the symposium to get a feel for how viewers might respond. Prepare a four- to five-minute overview of the project, where you walk these pre-viewers through the poster, drawing their attention to the most critical points and filling in interesting details as needed. Make note of the kinds of questions these pre-viewers have, and be ready to answer those questions. You might even consider making a supplemental handout that provides additional information or answers predictable questions.

How long should I let audience members look at the poster before engaging them in discussion?

Don’t feel as if you have to start talking to viewers the minute they stop in front of your poster. Give them a few moments to read and process the information. Once viewers have had time to acquaint themselves with your project, offer to guide them through the poster. Say something like “Hello. Thanks for stopping to view my poster. Would you like a guided tour of my project?” This kind of greeting often works better than simply asking “Do you have any questions?” because after only a few moments, viewers might not have had time to come up with questions, even though they are interested in hearing more about your project.

Should I read from my poster?

No! Make sure you are familiar enough with your poster that you can talk about it without looking at it. Use the poster as a visual aid, pointing to it when you need to draw viewers’ attention to a chart, photograph, or particularly interesting point.

Sample Posters

Click on the links below to open a PDF of each sample poster.

“Quantitative Analysis of Artifacts in Volumetric DSA: The Relative Contributions of Beam Hardening and Scatter to Vessel Dropout Behind Highly Attenuating Structures”  James R. Hermus, Timothy P. Szczykutowicz, Charles M. Strother, and Charles Mistretta

Departments of Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Radiology: University of Wisconsin-Madison

“Self-Care Interventions for the Management of Mouth Sores in Hematology Patients Receiving Chemotherapy” Stephanie L. Dinse and Catherine Cherwin

School of Nursing: University of Wisconsin-Madison

“Enhancing the Fluorescence of Wisconsin Infrared Phytofluor: Wi-Phy for Potential Use in Infrared Imaging”  Jerad J. Simmons and Katrina T. Forest

Department of Bacteriology: University of Wisconsin-Madison

thesis poster examples

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Poster content

What is a poster and what goes into it?

A poster is a snapshot of your research. It is neither as detailed as an article nor as brief as an abstract. The goal is to provide enough information so that a detailed discussion can be carried out based on it, yet remain  short enough that someone can scan the poster in a few minutes and understand what your research is about. It is important to think about the audience when designing a research poster. 

There may be some differences between posters created for the sciences versus the humanities but the goal is the same.

A good poster should have:

  • A Catchy Title . The title is one of the first things that someone might see when passing by your poster. A catchy title can entice someone to stop and spend a few minutes at your poster. In addition to the title, the header of your poster must also contain the author name(s), the name of your school (and logo, if you have permission to use it).
  • An Introduction . This section can contain your thesis statement, the goals or objectives of your research, your motivations for carrying out the research and a brief literature review.
  • An Overview of the Methods . This section should discuss the methods used. You may also discuss the rationalization for your method or why it is suitable for this kind of research.
  • Results/Discussion . This section shows the data you collected and/or an analysis of the data. Charts, graphs, pictures can be used here to show trends that might be hard to see if a data table were used instead. The idea is to highlight the key aspects of your data or data analysis in a way that is easy for anyone to see.
  • A Strong Conclusion . This section highlights the important aspects gained from this research. It can also highlight the importance of the work as a whole. Researchers who intend to continue working on this project will also add some further direction in this section to give a preview of what aspect they may research in the future.
  • A References Section . Don't forget to cite any sources used, including images or graphics that you used that were not yours. Ensure you know the copyright laws regarding images since your poster will be displayed in a public area.
  • Acknowledgements . It is important to thank those that contributed to your research, including your professor or supervisor, the institution and any funding-related sponsors you may have had.

See the resources linked below for more tips on presenting various aspects of your poster content.

  • How to design an award-winning conference poster
  • How to report data in a way that readers need to know This article provides tips on how to present data effectively.
  • Scientific Poster Tutorials This article describes what goes into a scientific poster including the breakdown of each section.
  • Six Principles of Communicating Data: A Checklist This short article also includes a link to a checklist document that can help you ensure that you are communicating your data effectively.
  • Ten Simple Rules for a Good Poster Presentation This article by Thomas C Erren and Philip E Bourne covers all aspects of a poster presentation from content to visual design and also tips for presenting it well to your visitors.
  • Research Posters and Presentations - Tufts This resource talks about what to consider in terms of layout, colour choices, fonts, and graphics.

Tools for poster design

You do not need access to special graphic design software to create a research poster. These tools are free for MRU students to access and easy to learn.

  • PowerPoint - MRU students are eligible to access Office 365 for free . Your poster is essentially a large PowerPoint slide. To set your poster dimensions, create a new blank PowerPoint presentation. Select Design - Slide Size - Custom Slide Size. Enter the dimensions specified by your instructor or the event you are attending. If you are submitting your poster to be printed, these instructions will walk you through exporting the slide as a pdf file.
  • Google Slides - This is a good option if you are designing a poster as a group project. You will create a large Google Slide. To set your poster dimensions, create a new slide presentation and select File - Page Setup - Custom. Enter the poster dimensions required by your professor or the event you are attending. To submit your poster for printing, export the slide presentation to pdf.
  • Canva - Canva is a user friendly online tool for graphic design. Basic accounts are free but come with limited features, including static sizing once a project has been created. For that reason, it is important to set the size of your poster before you begin. Once you've created an account, select the Create a Design button in the top right and then select Custom Size at the bottom of the menu. Enter the dimensions specified by your instructor or the event you are attending.

If you would like to use Adobe Illustrator to create your poster, you will find this software installed on computers in the RLLC on the second floor.

  • Tipsheet on creating poster in PPT and saving to PDF

Poster design

Poster design is important

Unlike an oral presentation, people will need to be visually enticed to stop at your poster. Additionally, a poster is a visual medium. The visual aspects and organization of your poster can have a significant impact on the success of your poster presentation. 

  • Organize your information into sections. Resist the temptation to use too many words. Use only as many words as needed to get the message across.
  • Ensure flow between sections. It is thought that people scan a poster in either a Z format or in columns. Whichever style you choose, make it obvious for the reader so they know how to follow along. Clear section headings or numbering your sections can help.
  • Use pictures, graphs or charts to display data or trends . They say a picture is worth a thousand words or in this case, numbers. Make it easier for your reader to understand why the data is important.
  • Use color appropriately . The use of color requires balance. Too much color can overpower your poster and too little can make it visually bland.
  • Font size is important. Remember that most people will initially stop between 5 and 10 feet away from your poster. If they can't read your poster from that point, they may just choose to move on. 

The posters below are samples to give you ideas on how to approach your poster's design. 

Sample Posters

The sample presented below are to give you a visual idea of what a poster might look like and to spark your imagination. The best posters are created when you use your own sense of creativity and style.

  • Undergraduate Research Poster Samples - University of Texas This excellent resource has 16 sample poster designs. For each poster sample, the strengths and areas for improvement are discussed. This resource is a must-see if you are designing your first poster.
  • Design Tips for Creating an Arts and Humanities Poster - by Mark McDayter This is a great article about designing posters for the arts and humanities with visual examples.
  • Poster Tips for Humanities Conference Posters - by Stephanie Krom This article has tips on designing as well as presenting your poster.

Presenting your poster

You submitted an abstract, got accepted, did the research and created the poster and now you stand beside your poster waiting for a visitor or adjudicator to ask you about your research.

Tips for answering questions about your poster (graciously provided by Anne Scrimger)

  • ​Listen to what the person is asking. Are they asking you for an overview, or do they have  a specific question? Listening is an important skill. If you don’t listen, you cannot answer the question correctly.
  • Do you understand their question? If you’re not sure then clarify it repeating it back in a different way and look for affirmation from your visitor.
  • Answer the question using a general three-point format: a) Introduction: Introduce yourself (by name) and what you studied and what motivated your research. b) Results: Describe the relevant results that help to answer the question that they asked. c) Conclusion: Explain how the results supports your case, state any missing pieces of information and describe any further research you intend to do that may add to the answer in the future.
  • Ask the visitor if they would like to know more about anything you described and whether you answered their question.
  • Think about your audience. Avoid jargon and acronyms unless you are sure the person knows the terminology.
  • Tips for presenting at a student conference - Science Atlantic This article has tips for both oral and poster presentations. The poster presentation section has guidelines for poster design including aspects such as font sizes, as well as advice for speaking about your poster to visitors.

Infographics

  • What is an Infographic
  • Infographic Resources
  • Presenting Your Infographic

Infographics use images to present information in an efficient and visually appealing way.

Example 

Infographic on women's eye health that uses pie charts and icons to share data

Women's Eye Health Infographic by National Institutes of Health,  CC-BY-NC 2.0

Don't Forget to Cite!

Many of the infographics you will find online do not include references to their sources.  However , as a student you are responsible for meeting the citation standards specified by your instructor. Please clarify with your instructor if they would like you cite in-text, if the reference list needs to appear at the bottom of the infographic, and what format should those citations take before submitting your work.

  • Create Infographics (University of Guelph) This helpful resource provides links to tools you can use to design an infographic along with tips
  • What is an Infographic? (Royal Roads) Provides design guidelines, software options, and examples
  • Creative knowledge translation using infographics

You submitted an abstract, got accepted, did the research and created the infographic and now you stand beside your work waiting for a visitor or adjudicator to ask you about your research.

Tips for answering questions about your infographic (graciously provided by Anne Scrimger)

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the work of  Zahra Premji, who created the inaugural version of this guide in 2016

Copyright - Do you have permission to reuse an image?

In-class presentations and public presentations off campus have different copyright rules. While it may be OK to use an image you found on the Internet and cite it for an in-class presentation, presentations shared publicly online or off campus should only use images where the copyright holder has given permission for their reuse (for example, the image is licensed CC-BY).  Visit the Copyright Guide or reach out to the MRU Copyright Advisor at  [email protected]  for more information. 

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  • << Previous: Writing Abstracts
  • Next: Oral Presentations >>

Undergraduate Research & Prestigious Scholarships

Poster presentation examples, from past urcad events.

Select image to view the poster.

Mobolanle Adebesin's Poster

Mobolanle Adebesin Psychology

Eric Adjakwah's Poster

Eric Adjakwah Health Administration and Policy

Theophilus Aluko's Poster

Theophilus Aluko Mechanical Engineering

Hannah Aris's Poster

Hannah Aris Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Robin Arnold's Poster

Robin Arnold Psychology

Riley Auer's Poster

Riley Auer Ancient Studies Zoe Wang Visual Arts

Farhan Augustine

Farhan Augustine Chemistry and Biochemistry

Cara Borja

Cara Borja Psychology

Syrena Bracey

Syrena Bracey Chemistry and Biochemistry

Ann Cirincione

Ann Cirincione Biological Sciences

Thomas Coard

Thomas Coard Biological Sciences

Nora Corasaniti

Nora Corasaniti Political Science

Joelle Cusic

Joelle Cusic Chemistry and Biochemistry

Hanna Dasoo

Hanna Dasoo Political Science

Vineed Dayal

Vineed Dayal Mechanical Engineering

Caitlin Dea

Caitlin Dea Education

Logan Dean

Logan Dean Political Science

Lynne Deckel

Lynne Deckel Education

Yash Desai

Yash Desai Biological Sciences

Nidhi Dheman

Nidhi Dheman Psychology

Elise Donkor

Elise Donkor Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Katlyn Easter

Katlyn Easter Psychology

Chiamaka Ekwunazu

Chiamaka Ekwunazu Psychology

Samantha Eng

Samantha Eng Biological Sciences

Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher

Rivka Fleischman

Rivka Fleischman Psychology

Amelia Hallworth

Amelia Hallworth Biological Sciences

Oluwagbotemi Igbaroola

Oluwagbotemi Igbaroola Biological Sciences

Robyn Jasper

Robyn Jasper Biological Sciences

Alicia Khan

Alicia Khan Psychology

Su Hyoung Kim

Su Hyoung Kim Visual Arts

Matthew Kovarek

Matthew Kovarek Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Sekar Kulandaivel

Sekar Kulandaivel Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Julian Loiacono

Julian Loiacono Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Joshua Massey

Joshua Massey Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Natalie McDonald

Natalie McDonald Chemistry and Biochemistry

Sean Najmi

Sean Najmi Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Colin OHern

Colin O’Hern Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Nneka Opara

Nneka Opara Psychology

Julian Paige

Julian Paige Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Sarah Pollock

Sarah Pollock Chemistry and Biochemistry

Asma Qaiyumi

Asma Qaiyumi Psychology

Rebekah Rashford

Rebekah Rashford Biological Sciences

Sierra Reeb

Sierra Reeb Education

Allison Reichard

Allison Reichard Psychology

Hayley Richardson

Hayley Richardson Biological Sciences

Brent Runge

Brent Runge Chemistry and Biochemistry

Rima Sakhawala

Rima Sakhawala Biological Sciences

Gabrielle Salib

Gabrielle Salib Information Systems

Carly Sciandra

Carly Sciandra Chemistry and Biochemistry

Erika Schumacher

Erika Schumacher Visual Arts

Matthew Shirley

Matthew Shirley Chemistry and Biochemistry

Nicole Simke

Nicole Simke Visual Arts

Sidrah Shayiq

Sidrah Shayiq Education

Tracee Simms

Tracee Simms Psychology

Amelia Smith

Amelia Smith Biological Sciences

Savannah Steinly

Savannah Steinly Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Zane Stump

Nevin Varghese Chemistry and Biochemistry

Andrea Wozniak

Andrea Wozniak Computer Science and Electrical Engineering

Fan Zhang

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Edit an academic poster sample

Free Academic Poster Templates to Customize Online

Customize free academic poster design templates to show the results of your research in a graphic and visual way. get your scientific poster layout in minutes..

Make a  scientific poster design template  to synthesize all the information of your investigation. See in an organized way what you have learned and communicate it to everyone.

Customizable academic poster template free download

Customize a scientific poster template for your academic presentations

An academic poster is an innovative way to present the results and information obtained after scientific research. It is necessary that all parts of a scientific poster are arranged in order.

Edit.org makes it easy for you to create academic poster designs and make an incredibly good presentation. You will be able to organize everything in a professional way so that your message is clear and powerful.

Our team of designers has created academic and scientific poster examples  as well as all kinds of academic posters  so that you just have to choose the one that best suits your needs.

Among the different templates, you can create:

  • An effective science outreach poster with the ultimate goal of clearly displaying the information obtained.
  • A scientific poster for the academic public to be captivated by your research.
  • Create all kinds of templates to make scientific posters that you can design step by step thanks to the editor, very easy to use. Choose from our extensive catalog of templates and in a few minutes, you will have the result you expect, all for free!

Online scientific poster maker with free designs

How to edit an academic research poster template with Edit.org

  • Click on any image in this article or, if you prefer, go to our editor and choose one template.
  • Design and customize your design without limits! Add the text you want, choose your favorite color, and upload your logo, a thousand options at your fingertips!
  • Save and share your creation with others. 
  • Download it in the format you need and in the highest quality! JPG, PDF, PNG... choose yours. 

You're done!

Download academic poster design template for free

Free academic poster templates to download and print

Thanks to the pre-designed templates, Edit.org is one of the best programs to make academic posters in a simple and fast way, but with the results of a professional graphic designer. In addition, if you wanr, you can make a design from scratch completely to your liking.

Apart from this, design anything you want in terms of educational graphic content . From organizing your lesson plan with our templates, rewarding the best student of the week with a diploma , or more socially, promoting campaigns against poverty .

Don't miss the opportunity to be a reference using Edit.org's educational graphic content.

Choose from different examples of editable Academic Posters for your presentations, visit our online editor!

Free academic poster presentation templates

Edit an academic poster sample

Movie posters

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Poster Samples

Looking at samples of real student posters can help you generate ideas and define your goals. As you get started, it may be helpful to look at examples of finished posters.

Below are a number of sample posters created by UT undergraduates. There is a brief discussion of each poster highlighting its greatest strengths and areas where there is room for improvement.

Poster Sample 1

  • More than one type of visual aid
  • Logical order for sections
  • Acknowledgments

Room for improvement

  • Background may be distracting, or detract from content
  • Sections and images are not aligned
  • Too many visual components clutter poster

Poster Sample 2

  • White space
  • Legible text and graphics
  • Reports preliminary results
  • All participants listed as authors, with affiliations provided
  • Lacks Citations and Acknowledgements
  • Labeling of images/graphics
  • Inconsistent text alignment
  • Color-saturated background

Poster Sample 3

  • Clearly defined research questions
  • Effective use of visual aids
  • Clear organizational structure
  • Bullets break up text
  • Technical language/undefined acronyms (accessible to limited audience)
  • Narrow margins within text boxes
  • Too many thick borders around boxes
  • Uses UT seal instead of college or university wordmark

Poster Sample 3

  • Clear introductory material
  • Use of bullet points
  • Logical flow
  • Color-coding in graphics
  • Lacks references section
  • May not be accessible to all audiences (some technical language)
  • No need for borders around sections (the blue headers are sufficient)

Poster Sample 4

  • Compelling visual aids
  • Strategic use of color
  • Clear sections
  • Inconsistent fonts in body text
  • Abstract section mislabeled
  • Bullet points are great, but only if they’re used judiciously

Poster Sample 5

  • Parameters of study well defined
  • Clearly defined research question
  • Simple color scheme
  • Use of white space
  • Discussion of Results
  • Minor formatting misalignments
  • Unauthorized use of UT seal (use wordmark instead)

Poster Sample 6

  • Venn diagram in discussion
  • Consistent graphics
  • Multiple types of visual aids
  • Light text on dark background
  • Color backgrounds should be avoided, especially dark ones
  • Unlabeled, non-credited photos

Poster Sample 7

  • Easy to read
  • Use of shapes, figures, and bullets to break up text
  • Compelling title (and title font size)
  • Clean overall visual impression
  • Many sections without a clear flow between them
  • Lacks acknowledgements

Poster Sample 8

  • Use of images/graphics
  • Clear title
  • Accessible but professional tone
  • Length/density of text blocks
  • Tiny photo citations
  • Connections between images and descriptive text
  • Vertical boxes unnecessary

Poster Sample 9

  • Compelling title
  • Font sizes throughout (hierarchy of text)
  • Simple graphics
  • Lacks clear Background section
  • Relationship of Findings and Conclusion to Research questions

Poster Sample 10

  • Use of visual aids
  • Uneven column width
  • Center-justfied body text
  • Lacks “Methods” section

Poster Sample 11

  • Use of bullets
  • Too many different font styles (serif and sans serif, bold and normal)
  • Concise interpretation of graphics

Poster Sample 12

  • Accessible visual structure
  • Clear, simple graphics
  • Fonts and font sizes
  • Analysis of graphic data
  • Discussion of significance
  • Lacks author’s affiliation and contact information

Poster Sample 13

  • Balance among visuals, text and white space
  • Data presented in visual format (SmartArt)
  • Accesible to many audiences (simple enough for general audience, but enough methodological detail for experts)
  • Some more editing needed
  • When targeting an expert audience (as in the methodology section), should also report statistics ( r, p, t, F, etc.)

Poster Sample 14

  • Large, clear title
  • Creative adaptation of sections
  • Use of lists (rather than paragraphs)
  • Accessible to diverse audience
  • Connection between visuals (sheet music) and content

Poster Sample 14

  • Strategic use of color for section headers
  • Labeling and citation of images
  • Accessible to a broad audience
  • Wide margins around poster edges
  • Slightly text-heavy
  • Data referenced (“Methodology”) but not discussed

What is my next step?

Begin working on the content for your poster at Create Your Message .

Poster Templates & Printing

Poster sessions offer researchers opportunities to highlight their work. Almost all major scientific meetings have poster sessions, with posters formatted and printed in a standard way. This page provides information and resources.

Poster Resources

Poster printing.

  • For undergraduates
  • For anyone  

Displaying data

  • Designing figures

Research Poster Templates

Poster templates in multiple styles is available especially for Natural Sciences students and researchers. Use these templates for polished presentations to display your work. 

There are two sizes to choose from, each available in PPT and each containing eight different styles, with four layout options per style: 

·        Click here for 35x48 inches or

·        Click here for 42x56 inches Slides 1-5 include instructions on how to choose the best template for your project and edit it accordingly.

If you need to design scientific figures for your poster or write a layperson-friendly summary of your research, you may also want to consult the summary of resources on science communication .

Poster Printing for Undergraduate Researchers

For undergraduates, the Office of Experiential Learning has a poster printer that can be used in support of on-campus poster sessions (for degrees or departments) or for poster assignments in courses. Because this facility is not staffed as a full-service printing facility, course-based printing and on-campus event printing must be coordinated in advance. Requests must be submitted at least one week in advance of the event or due date. Requests may take up to five business days to process (from file submission to poster pick-up). Additionally, course-based posters are limited to a canvas size of 24 x 36 inches.  Please email group or individual poster printing requests to: [email protected]

Additionally, undergraduates presenting in Undergraduate Studies' Longhorn Research Poster Session have options through the Office of Undergraduate Research .   

Group Printing Requests

The college’s poster printer can be used in support of on-campus poster sessions (for degrees or departments), or for poster assignments in courses. However, our facility is not staffed as a full-service printing facility, and course-based printing and on-campus event printing must be coordinated with our office in advance.  Requests must be submitted at least one week in advance of the event or due date.  Requests may take up to five business days to process (from file submission to poster pick-up). Additionally, course-based posters are limited to a canvas size of  24 x 36 inches.

Individual Printing Requests

Printing can be done Monday - Friday, 8:30am to 4:00pm. During the Fall and Spring academic semesters, we require a 48-hour turnaround time for all individual poster printing requests. In the Summer, we require a 72-hour turn around time to accomodate for our reduced staff. 

Please email group or individual poster printing requests to: [email protected]

Printing Fees for Undergrads

Our main focus is to provide printing services for CNS undergraduate students . Currently, there is a fee of $25 for any College of Natural Sciences student inquiring poster printing with us. At this time, we regret that we are no longer able to provide printing for non-undergraduate CNS students, faculty or persons outside of the college .    

Poster printing requests from current FRI students and students participating in our annual Undergraduate Research Forum will be printed free of charge.  Please provide us with the stream name you are associated with and the event you are attending when requesting this service. If your event has historically received a reduced or free printing rate, you may inquire on a case by case basis for future printing at [email protected]

Instructions

Max size: 42" wide x 60" long. There is an additional $10 per foot over 60 inches in length. Completed posters should be sent to [email protected] . Please also include a copy of your payment receipt in the email to confirm payment. When emailing your poster, please entitle your document "last name_first name". 

Posters can be designed in Powerpoint:

  • In Page Setup, set the size you would like your poster to be. For example, 42" x 60" or 36" x 54." Typical font size for the poster title at this scale would be around 90, with poster text around 24.
  • Please do not use dark backgrounds for your posters. These require too much ink and delays the printing process.

Accepted file formats are PowerPoint (PPT) and PDF. Poster printing is done on PCs, and Mac compatibility may be a challenge.For additional questions, please contact us at or call 512-232-9358.

Poster Printing for Anyone

UT Libraries offer poster printing for all of the UT community.

The Biodiversity Center provides professional printing services for research posters as well as design consultation services for reasonable hourly rates.

UT’s Document Solutions  offers poster printing for researchers.

Several departments and centers in CNS have their own poster printers. Check with your department to learn more.Note that nearly all research poster-printing services require advanced notice of a few days and are for-fee services.

Customer Reviews

Free research poster powerpoint templates.

Beaumont PowerPoint poster template

About our free research poster templates

Easy to use and customize.

▪ Change colors with one click ▪ Most standard US and international poster sizes. ▪ Support for all PowerPoint versions ▪ Only basic PowerPoint skills required ▪ Fully customizable ▪ Instructions included with the poster templates. ▪ Online video tutorials ▪ Configured to print professionally ▪ Additional layouts included in each template

40 color schemes built-in to every research poster template

Five reasons to print your poster with us >, professionally designed research poster templates.

QUICK FIND POSTER TEMPLATES American standard poster sizes (inches) 
 30x40 | 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual International common poster sizes (centimeters)
 91x122 | 70x100 | 100x140 | 100x100 | 100x200 | A0 | A1 | Virtual IMPORTANT Check the requirements of your conference before you download and work on a poster template. If you need further assistance, our phone support is available and free. We are here to provide the best service you can ask for.

Step-by-Step Tutorials

This series of short videos and animated tutorials will walk you through the research poster-making process, answering the most common questions along the way.

  Need further poster template assistance? 510.649.3001

Free powerpoint poster templates for research poster presentations.

Scientific research poster template - Aragon

Poster template design: Aragon Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold  | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Beaumont

Poster template design: Beaumont Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold  | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Newfield

Poster template design:  Newfield Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold |  Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Poster template design:  Winchester Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Lockwood

Poster template design:  Lockwood Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Poster template design:  Kensington Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Stone

Poster template design:  Stone A new, simplified concept for better poster design Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download A0 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Marquee

Poster template design:  Marquee Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Poster template design:  Winston Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download A0 ► View Samples    ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Chamberlain

Poster template design:  Chamberlain Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Scientific research poster template - Forrest

Poster template design:  Forrest Standard poster sizes in inches (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 36x48 | 36x56 | 36x60 | 36x72 | 36x96 | 42x60 | 42x72 | 42x90 | 44x44 | 30x40 | 48x48 | 48x72 | 48x96 | Trifold | Virtual - Standard Screen (4:3 Ratio) | Virtual - Wide Screen (16:9 Ratio) Standard poster sizes in centimeters (Height x Width) - Click on a size to download 122x91 | 100x70 | 140x100 | 100x100 | 200x100 | A0 | A1 ► View Samples   ► Learn how to customize the template colors

Virtual research poster handouts

Instant QR Code Generator

Add functionality to your poster! Share a link to a page, your email or additional info on the web. It's easy, free and further connects your audience! 

Trifold poster presentation

Professional Trifold Poster Boards

Ready to use out of the box. Great solution for tabletop 36x48 Trifold poster presentations. Price includes printing, mounting and free Ground FedEx shipping.

Font size preview charts

Poster Font Size Checker

A convenient way to visualize what size the text will be on your printed poster.  Wondering how big the fonts will be on your poster? Download and print this PDF on your desktop printer.

Quick access to ALT code symbols

Quick access to ALT code symbols


Click here to choose from over 350 easy to copy and use ALT code symbols.

Fabric research poster folded in bag

Fabric Research Posters

Say goodbye to poster tubes with a professional fabric poster you can pack in your luggage! With our crease-resistant EasyTravel™ fabric your presentation will look professional, sharp, and will pack nicely in your carry-on.

Poster presenters

Simplify Your Group’s Poster-Ordering Process

Join our free service designed to help you coordinate your group’s poster orders, get discounted rates and customized special features not normally available for standard orders.

Links to university corporate identity (Logo) pages

List of corporate identity pages where you can download university logos to use with your poster presentation. Help your fellow researchers. Good quality logos for use in printed research posters  are difficult to find online. If you have a link to the identity page of your university, email it to us and we will add it to our list for others to use.

UC Berkeley Texas A&M UCLA Columbia Medical Center Stanford University

Adelphi University Duke University UPENN Bradley University ENMU

UNC Chapel Hill Northwestern University Magnet recognition Seal  Howard University University of Houston

Drexel University Carlow University UNLV UNR UFL

TUFTS George Mason U. St. Scholastica College Mount Royal University Penn State

Yale University University of Wisconsin SD School of Mines USC GATECH

STARTER POWERPOINT POSTER TEMPLATES

Standard size research poster templates in inches use these starter poster templates as a starting point for your own poster designs, thumbnails of posters are shown in proportion to each others’ sizes based on a 48 inch (height) x 96 inch (width) display area, 36” tall x 48” wide
.

STARTER 36x48 POWERPOINT POSTER TEMPLATE The 36x48 scientific poster template size is one of the smaller sizes and also one of the most common. It is very suitable for scientific posters with low to moderate amount of text and graphics. The 36x48 research poster template can also be printed at the following sizes without distortion or any necessary adjustments: 36x48 (Standard), 42x56, 48x64, 30x40

Trifold (tabletop)

STARTER    TRIFOLD POWERPOINT POSTER TEMPLATE These free PowerPoint poster templates are designed for a standard 3x4 foot poster presentation to be mounted on a standard Trifold poster board. This research poster template should be printed only at the following size: 36x48 (Standard Trifold) This poster template is for a standard Trifold board presentation. You can use it with poster boards available at office-supply stores or our professional ready-to-use Trifold poster presentation product. Are you looking for a larger MonsterBoard template? Use this PowerPoint MonsterBoard template.

36” Tall x 56” Wide

STARTER    36x56 POWERPOINT POSTER TEMPLATE This free PowerPoint poster template is designed for a standard 3x4.5 foot poster presentation. This PowerPoint research poster template is for a medium size poster. It is suitable for most poster presentations. It can accommodate moderate to large amounts of content.

 This scientific poster template can be printed at the following sizes:
 36x56 (Standard), 42x65.3, 48x74.6

36” Tall x 60” Wide

STARTER 36x60 POWERPOINT POSTER TEMPLATE This free PowerPoint poster template is designed for a standard 3x5 foot poster presentation. This is also one of the standard sizes. It is used mostly when the height of the presentation board is only three feet and there is more content to present that can fit in a 48x36 poster.

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  • Apr 11, 2023

How to design an impactful 3MT slide (with examples!)

things going into a funnel to make a 3MT slide

What can you do in three minutes? Brush your teeth, make a coffee?

How about explain your entire PhD thesis? 😅

Believe it or not, that’s what thousands of people do each year in the Three Minute Thesis (3MT ® ); a global public speaking competition where PhD students explain the scope and impact of their research in, you guessed it, just three minutes . ⏰

And if you’re reading this, perhaps you’re an aspiring 3MT-er yourself, on the hunt for some inspiration to design an impactful 3MT slide to accompany your talk.

Sound like you? Then you’ve come to the right place.

Previously, we gave you some tips and tricks on how to write a winning 3MT script , but in this instalment of our 3MT series, we’re switching gears to cover another very important aspect:

We’ve trawled the internet to discover what actually makes a good three minute thesis slide, and in this blog, we’ll cover some do’s and don’ts to help you design one that’s memorable and impactful. To help bring these concepts home, we’ll also include some examples that we love from past 3MT winners and finalists.

But before we do that, let’s recap some important rules related to the 3MT slide:

3MT slide rules

So, in short, the 3MT slide obviously needs to be fairly simple. But that doesn’t mean it has to be boring.

Hold up… if the 3MT is a public speaking competition, why is the slide even important? Surely only what you speak about matters, right? WRONG! 🙅‍♀️

The 3MT competition is about so much more than just what you say. It’s also about what you do and what you show And what you show during your 3MT is where your nifty little slide comes in.

Not only is the PowerPoint slide a key component of the 3MT judging criteria , it also helps create a lasting mental image for the judges. After all, you can’t win the 3MT if the audience and judges can’t even remember what your research is about!

So, hopefully we’ve been able to convince you about just how important having a good slide is. But how do you design an impactful 3MT slide, you ask?

Well, here are 5 of our top tips:

Tip #1: Avoid data dumping 📊

You might be familiar with those boring old PowerPoint presentations that seem to appear at every conference. You know the ones I’m talking about. The ones cluttered with complex graphs, huge tables, and enough numbers to put even the most experienced professors to sleep.

May I present to you… Exhibit A:

My PhD research example slide

Look familiar? Good. Now lock the memory away in a distant room of your mind palace, because that’s exactly what you DON’T want in a 3MT slide (or really, in any slide for that matter…)

Unlike a conference presentation, your 3MT slide should simply act to enhance and complement your script, rather than be used to display complex data and graphs. In fact, I would suggest avoiding the use of any complex graphs and data tables at all, because they just end up detracting attention from what you’re saying.

If you choose to present some important data or statistics in your 3MT slide, consider swapping out graphs with simple infographics , like pie charts or diagrams:

an image displaying From This to This turning a graph into an infographic of a salad bowl

As you can see, simple infographics and eye-catching figures are a much more visually stimulating way to present information, especially compared to data-heavy graphs and tables. And they’re surprisingly easy to make using tools like Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Express .

So, if in doubt, leave complex data out. 🚫

In fact, you’ll find that most successful 3MT-ers show little to no data at all in their slides and intentionally keep them very conceptual, which brings me to tip #2.

Tip #2: Keep it conceptual 💡

Perhaps you’re sensing a general theme here… that typically less is more when it comes to a 3MT slide. This allows the focus of the presentation to be on the speaker, the slide simply acting as a visual aid to complement the story . And when it’s a public speaking competition, I’d say that’s pretty important.

In our humble opinion, some of the most effective and memorable 3MT slides are those that present an image or diagram that conveys a single underpinning concept or idea .

You might recall from our ‘ How to Write a Winning 3MT Script ’ blog post, that many successful 3MT scripts incorporate things like humour, analogies , or fictional characters. In these situations, it can be helpful for the contents of the slide to reflect this.

One of my favourite examples of this comes from 2016 Asia-Pacific 3MT Winner, Joshua Chu-Tan , who spoke about his research on gene therapy treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) to target the root of vision loss. In his winning presentation, he says:

quote for Joshua Chu-Tan, winner of 3MT, about age-related macular degeneration

Rather than using complex diagrams to show the theory, he opted for this simple, yet extremely powerful image that highlights the impact of vision loss from age-related macular degeneration. And, seeing as this image has stuck in my memory for years, I’d say it was a pretty good choice.

As another example, back when I won the 3MT , I used an analogy to draw parallels between A) cars carrying passengers on a highway, and B) nanoparticles carrying drugs along a blood vessel. So, my 3MT slide portrayed a busy highway with signage to show which hypothetical organs the cars were headed towards:

3MT quote from Cintya Dharmayanti, 3MT winner, about nanoparticles being tiny carriers on a highway

Basically, the overarching message is to keep it simple.

And that’s all well and good… But where do you even start?

Your first step is to write your 3MT script . Then, once you have your script prepared, use it as a tool to help you brainstorm ideas for your slide. Note whether you’ve used any analogies, introduced any characters, or covered certain concepts, and then based on this information, find or create a visual to match! 🖼 This might be a little different to your usual scientific presentations, where you would normally prepare your slides first, then come up with what you are going to say after, but trust me – it works!

Tip #3: Choose an eye-catching visual… or make one 👀

In the same way that ‘ the hook’ in your 3MT script helps to pique the audience’s attention, the slide is another important tool to capture their attention and keep them engaged. But to do this, it needs to be eye-catching and interesting .

We’ve noticed that most winning 3MTs have slides that generally fall under one of two categories: images or diagrams .

These are usually photographs or illustrations that complement the script in some way — containing a reference to the concept, analogy or character(s) that were introduced in the script.

For example, let’s say you introduced a fictional character in your 3MT script. By visually showing this character in your slide, it helps the audience form a connection with them and taps into their sense of empathy. Let’s look at an example:

Amanda Khamis, 3MT winner, on treatments for babies with cerebral palsy

As you can see, using this photograph makes for a really effective and impactful slide because it elicits a strong emotional response. Come on… how can you not love that adorable little face, right? 🥺

However, the images don’t have to be of people to be effective – they can also be more conceptual.

For instance, one 3MT finalist spoke about their research on detecting diseases, like cancer, based on characteristic molecules present in the breath. In their slide, they showed an illustration of breath molecules exiting the lungs and mouth to be caught in a net:

Merryn Baker, 3MT winner, quote about a material that can capture molecules from the breath like a net

Not only is this image a great reference to the net analogy used, but we (as the audience) are able to get a basic idea about the research concept based on the slide alone, which really helps it stick in our memory!

Of course, while we’ve highlighted some great examples, you should choose whatever image speaks to you and your research. Some useful resources to find images for your 3MT slide include iStock Photo and Adobe Stock Photos (making sure to provide attribution where required), or you can even be extra creative and take your own photo, or create your own image ! 📸

Aside from images, schematic diagrams can be another great way to conceptualise and visualise your research. However, to be effective as 3MT slides, the diagrams need to be simple and easy to understand.

Ideally, they should be short, and the outcomes immediately recognisable . Avoid using complex diagrams that you’ve directly copy-pasted from a paper, as these generally take a lot more time and concentration to understand.

A good example of a diagram for a 3MT slide was used by the 2020 Asia-Pacific 3MT winner , whose research focused on the development of a liquid glue to help measure electrical signals from plants as a way to measure their health:

example slide from Luo Yifei, 3MT winner, about developing a liquid glue that can detect plant electrical signals

In this example, it’s easy to understand what the research is about, what’s being measured, and what the desired outcomes are, thanks to the clear illustrations and emotive flower drawings.

So, if done well, diagrams can be a really powerful tool to conceptualise your research. If you want to try and create one yourself, there are lots of useful tools you can use, like Adobe Illustrator , Canva , or BioRender , to name a few.

Get creative!

Tip #4: Minimise text 💬

When it comes to presentations, there’s nothing worse than being in the audience, staring at a PowerPoint slide, only to find a wall of text staring back at you. Not only is it super distracting, but aesthetically, it also leaves much to be desired.

And let’s be honest, if the audience is reading your slide, then they’re not listening to you… and vice versa. Which, for the 3MT, is a very big problem.

To prevent this, try to avoid including large bodies of text on your 3MT slide . See if you can verbally communicate the information instead, or alternatively, replace the text with an image that conveys the same message. After all, they say a picture speaks a thousand words.

If you really need to include some text, as in the case of simple diagrams, try to keep it to a minimum and limit yourself to 15 words maximum.

Any text you do include should use a font size that can be easily seen from the back of the room (i.e., 24 pt. minimum). And, while they sometimes have their time and place, try to avoid using any cursive, funky, or hard-to-read fonts . Comic sans, I’m looking at you. 😒

Tip #5: Negative space is your friend 🔲

You might be tempted to fill every visible inch of your PowerPoint slide with images, diagrams, or just something to compensate for the very little time you have to present your 3MT.

Though, you’d be doing yourself a disservice if you did, because a little negative space can go a long way towards designing a great 3MT slide.

But what is negative space? Put simply, it’s the empty space around and between objects.

explaining negative space. the black plant is the main focal point, while the orange background represents negative space

Leaving some negative space in your slide gives the audience some breathing room and helps them focus on what’s important .

For photographs, this might mean choosing an image that has one focal point. This doesn’t necessarily mean the background needs to be plain, but it may simply be out of focus to allow the objects in the forefront to stand out.

For diagrams, this means leaving some empty space between sections so that there’s a clearer distinction between them, or reducing the number of sections entirely.

Here are some great examples of 3MT slides that use negative space to draw our attention to a particular person or object:

Baby crying

By leaving some negative space, our eyes are immediately drawn to one particular focal point, letting us focus on what’s important: You.

The take-home message 📝

And that brings us to the end of the second blog for our 3MT series!

The 3MT slide can truly make or break a 3MT presentation, but the right one can take it to the next level. And, by following these simple tips, you’re well on your way to designing a slide that captures your research in an effective and impactful way:

Avoid complex graphs and data

Keep it conceptual

Choose an eye-catching image or diagram, or make one

Keep text to a minimum, and

Don’t be afraid of negative space

So get creative! And remember, if you want to learn more about how to create amazing graphics, or how to up your public speaking skills, we’d love to show you how in our in-person science communication workshop s or online courses!

Contact us here to find out more. 🤩

Cintya Dharmayanti

Dr Tullio Rossi

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  • How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . It usually comes near the end of your introduction .

Your thesis will look a bit different depending on the type of essay you’re writing. But the thesis statement should always clearly state the main idea you want to get across. Everything else in your essay should relate back to this idea.

You can write your thesis statement by following four simple steps:

  • Start with a question
  • Write your initial answer
  • Develop your answer
  • Refine your thesis statement

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Table of contents

What is a thesis statement, placement of the thesis statement, step 1: start with a question, step 2: write your initial answer, step 3: develop your answer, step 4: refine your thesis statement, types of thesis statements, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay. It is a signpost telling the reader what the essay will argue and why.

The best thesis statements are:

  • Concise: A good thesis statement is short and sweet—don’t use more words than necessary. State your point clearly and directly in one or two sentences.
  • Contentious: Your thesis shouldn’t be a simple statement of fact that everyone already knows. A good thesis statement is a claim that requires further evidence or analysis to back it up.
  • Coherent: Everything mentioned in your thesis statement must be supported and explained in the rest of your paper.

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The thesis statement generally appears at the end of your essay introduction or research paper introduction .

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts and among young people more generally is hotly debated. For many who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education: the internet facilitates easier access to information, exposure to different perspectives, and a flexible learning environment for both students and teachers.

You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis , early in the writing process . As soon as you’ve decided on your essay topic , you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

You might already have a question in your assignment, but if not, try to come up with your own. What would you like to find out or decide about your topic?

For example, you might ask:

After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process .

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Now you need to consider why this is your answer and how you will convince your reader to agree with you. As you read more about your topic and begin writing, your answer should get more detailed.

In your essay about the internet and education, the thesis states your position and sketches out the key arguments you’ll use to support it.

The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education because it facilitates easier access to information.

In your essay about braille, the thesis statement summarizes the key historical development that you’ll explain.

The invention of braille in the 19th century transformed the lives of blind people, allowing them to participate more actively in public life.

A strong thesis statement should tell the reader:

  • Why you hold this position
  • What they’ll learn from your essay
  • The key points of your argument or narrative

The final thesis statement doesn’t just state your position, but summarizes your overall argument or the entire topic you’re going to explain. To strengthen a weak thesis statement, it can help to consider the broader context of your topic.

These examples are more specific and show that you’ll explore your topic in depth.

Your thesis statement should match the goals of your essay, which vary depending on the type of essay you’re writing:

  • In an argumentative essay , your thesis statement should take a strong position. Your aim in the essay is to convince your reader of this thesis based on evidence and logical reasoning.
  • In an expository essay , you’ll aim to explain the facts of a topic or process. Your thesis statement doesn’t have to include a strong opinion in this case, but it should clearly state the central point you want to make, and mention the key elements you’ll explain.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

Follow these four steps to come up with a thesis statement :

  • Ask a question about your topic .
  • Write your initial answer.
  • Develop your answer by including reasons.
  • Refine your answer, adding more detail and nuance.

The thesis statement should be placed at the end of your essay introduction .

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McCombes, S. (2023, August 15). How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/

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  1. Research Guides: How to Create a Research Poster: Poster Basics

    Design Tips Logos & Images What is a Research Poster? Posters are widely used in the academic community, and most conferences include poster presentations in their program. Research posters summarize information or research concisely and attractively to help publicize it and generate discussion.

  2. Free printable, customizable research poster templates

    Skip to start of list. 195 templates. Create a blank Research Poster. Plant and Animal Evolution Activity Research Poster in Hand Drawn Style. Poster by Canva Creative Studio. Green Orange Modern User Persona Landscape Poster. Poster by ruisaxila. Yellow and Orange Playful Illustrative Research Forum Poster. Poster by Letteringbynica.

  3. Research Poster Overview

    The elements of a research poster include the abstract, the research questions, methodologies, results, and the conclusions.

  4. PDF Creating a Research Poster

    Creating a Research Poster . What is a Research Poster? A research poster is an organized, visual display of the main points of your research or creative project. Typically, you present your poster in a poster session at a conference or seminar. Conference or seminar attendees will walk by your poster, study its contents, and ask you questions.

  5. Step by step

    You can section your poster according to the major points about your research you want to convey. For example: title, abstract, methodology, data, results, and conclusion. Consider the flow of your poster--these should be in a logical, easy-to-read order. Remember that most people read from left to right and top to bottom.

  6. PDF Effective Poster Presentations

    One part billboard, one part research paper. Good posters, like billboards, should capture the interest of the potential audience from distance. Make sure your poster is memorable. A poster should be self-sustaining The poster should be able to stand alone. A good poster contains just enough information to be understandable.

  7. PDF Making an Effective Research Poster: Design advice and inspirations

    Treat your poster presentation like a conversation. Prepare a mini "presentation" but allow for questions. Think about what you will point to on your poster to support what you are saying. Practice! Prepare 1-2 sentences per section. Use the And-But-Therefore framework or other effective communication strategy.

  8. Make a Good Poster

    Design Tips Poster Requirements Tips for Creating Poster Content Create and present your poster as if you were telling a story! The scope of many projects is too large to fit into a single good poster--it's all about editing the story you want to tell. Hear from one presenter about this process:

  9. Creating a Poster

    A poster presentation combines text and graphics to present your project in a way that is visually interesting and accessible. ... the what is made up of a claim or thesis statement and the evidence used to back it up. ... Here is an example: Wording in a paper: This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful ...

  10. PDF Creating and Presenting a Poster Script

    For example, the poster might be one part of a larger assignment. Sometimes an instructor can ask you to do a poster ... These are some of the main written elements you would need on your poster: Thesis/Main Point: A title and other prominent features should quickly and clearly convey your subject or main argument. Supporting Points: Headings ...

  11. Poster Presentations

    You do not need access to special graphic design software to create a research poster. These tools are free for MRU students to access and easy to learn. PowerPoint - MRU students are eligible to access Office 365 for free. Your poster is essentially a large PowerPoint slide. To set your poster dimensions, create a new blank PowerPoint ...

  12. PDF How To Make An Effective Poster

    First Thing First: The Title and Abstract. The title of your abstract is very important. Reflect the content of the paper. Specific and Succinct. Use key words for indexing and for searches. 250 Word Max. Includes the following: The research question or problem. The methods.

  13. Poster Presentation Examples

    Poster Presentation Examples - Undergraduate Research & Prestigious Scholarships - UMBC Poster Presentation Examples From past URCAD events Select image to view the poster. Mobolanle Adebesin Psychology Eric Adjakwah Health Administration and Policy Theophilus Aluko Mechanical Engineering Hannah Aris Chemical, Biochemical, and

  14. Free Academic Poster Templates to Customize Online

    Our team of designers has created academic and scientific poster examples as well as all kinds of academic posters so that you just have to choose the one that best suits your needs. Among the different templates, you can create: An effective science outreach poster with the ultimate goal of clearly displaying the information obtained.

  15. 18 Creative Research Poster Templates (Word, PowerPoint)

    18 Creative Research Poster Templates (Word, PowerPoint) Learning how to create a research poster template is important as these are widely used in conferences, presentations, and more, especially in the academic community.

  16. Poster Samples

    Poster Samples Looking at samples of real student posters can help you generate ideas and define your goals. As you get started, it may be helpful to look at examples of finished posters. Below are a number of sample posters created by UT undergraduates.

  17. Poster Templates & Printing

    When emailing your poster, please entitle your document "last name_first name". Posters can be designed in Powerpoint: In Page Setup, set the size you would like your poster to be. For example, 42" x 60" or 36" x 54." Typical font size for the poster title at this scale would be around 90, with poster text around 24.

  18. Powerpoint poster templates for research poster presentations

    Easy to use and customize Most standard US and international poster sizes. Support for all PowerPoint versions Only basic PowerPoint skills required Fully customizable Instructions included with the poster templates. Online video tutorials Additional layouts included in each template QUICK FIND POSTER TEMPLATES

  19. Free Research Poster Templates

    Default. Default. { {long-text-heading}} { {long-text-content}} Choose from dozens of online research poster template ideas from Adobe Express to help you easily create your own free research poster. All creative skill levels are welcome.

  20. 8 Scientific Poster Examples [And How To Create One]

    For example, effective scientific posters include images that explain complicated terms. At the same time, the poster layout makes data and text easy to read. Lastly, scientific posters uses simple language that allows even young children to understand concepts. 6 scientific poster examples

  21. Research Poster Templates

    A4 Vibrant Cognitive Behavior Research Poster research posters Tabloid Animal Yawning Study Research Poster research posters Blue Academic Poster research posters Business Tabloid Vibrant Placebo Experiment Research Poster research posters Premium Alcohol Addiction Study Research Poster research posters Premium Teamwork Poster research posters

  22. How to design an impactful 3MT slide (with examples!)

    Here are some great examples of 3MT slides that use negative space to draw our attention to a particular person or object: Joshua Robinson, 2022, Asia-Pacific 3MT Finalist, The University of Adelaide. Matthew Shaw, 2021, Asia-Pacific 3MT Winner, Swinburne University of Technology.

  23. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Placement of the thesis statement. Step 1: Start with a question. Step 2: Write your initial answer. Step 3: Develop your answer. Step 4: Refine your thesis statement. Types of thesis statements. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about thesis statements.