The Great Gatsby

Chapter 4 summary & analysis, f. scott fitzgerald.

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The Great Gatsby

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Chapter 4 Summary

During a Sunday morning party at Gatsby’s, church bells ring in the distance. The attendees hear the usual rumors about Gatsby’s origins are heard. Nick pauses to list the colorful regulars at Gatsby’s parties, which include a heterogeneous array of wealthy and successful individuals.

In late July, Gatsby drives to Nick’s house and takes him to lunch. On the drive, Nick is struck by Gatsby’s efforts to gauge whether or not Nick thinks highly of him. Eventually, he asks Nick’s opinion of him outright. He also asks what Nick thinks of Gatsby’s car, which is extremely luxurious and large.

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Gatsby confronts the rumors about his origins directly by saying he is the son of deceased wealthy parents from the Midwest. However, when asked where in the Midwest, he replies San Francisco.

Gatsby goes on to explain that after inheriting his deceased parents’ wealth, he spent years living lavishly in Europe. After Europe, he tells Nick, he showed great valor in World War I in the Ardennes, receiving medals of honor from multiple countries.

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One of the most arresting images in The Great Gatsby is Nick's vision of Gatsby stretching his arms out towards a small green light on the opposite shore of the bay. The mysterious, almost mystical nature of this gesture is a sure-fire sign that this green light is a symbol.

What is a symbol? It's something that is given extra meaning beyond itself. Something that stops being simply an everyday object, and instead represents thoughts and ideas that are bigger than itself.

What are the abstract ideas behind the green light in The Great Gatsby ? Read on to see where this symbol pops up in the novel, what themes it is connected to, which characters are most closely associated with it, and some ideas for essay topics on this symbol.

Quick Note on Our Citations

Our citation format in this guide is (chapter.paragraph). We're using this system since there are many editions of Gatsby, so using page numbers would only work for students with our copy of the book.

To find a quotation we cite via chapter and paragraph in your book, you can either eyeball it (Paragraph 1-50: beginning of chapter; 50-100: middle of chapter; 100-on: end of chapter), or use the search function if you're using an online or eReader version of the text.

What Is the Green Light in The Great Gatsby ?

Before we delve into the symbolic meaning of the green light, let's first establish what this object is in concrete terms.

The green light is a permanently lit electric lamp that marks the end of Daisy and Tom's boat dock. It's a way to warn boats at night or during inclement weather that there is a structure there—this is why it is always on.

Because the Buchanans' mansion is directly across the bay from Gatsby's mansion, Gatsby can always see the green light.

Key Quotes About the Green Light

In order to figure out what the green light means as a symbol, let's do some close reading of the moments where it occurs in The Great Gatsby.

The Green Light in Chapter 1

The image of the green light at the end of Daisy's dock occurs for the first time at the end of the novel's first chapter . Before we have even met Gatsby, we get a description of him stretching out his arms towards something he can't reach —a gesture he will repeat over and over again.

...a figure had emerged from the shadow of my neighbor's mansion and was standing with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars. Something in his leisurely movements and the secure position of his feet upon the lawn suggested that it was Mr. Gatsby himself, come out to determine what share was his of our local heavens.

...he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and far as I was from him I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward--and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness. (1.151-152)

One thing in particular is interesting about the introduction of the green light: it's very mysterious . Nick seems not to be quite sure where the light is, or what its function might be:

  • Although physically bounded by the width of the bay, the light is described as impossibly small ("minute" means "tiny enough to be almost insignificant") and confusingly distant.
  • Even though we find out later that the light never turns off, here Nick only seems to be able to see the light when Gatsby is reaching out towards it. As soon as Gatsby disappears, Nick is in "darkness."
  • This vagueness and mystery is a good way for the novel to underscore the fact that this light is a symbol —it stands not just for the physical object that it describes, but for an idea within the book. What's the idea? I'll talk all about it in the next section of this article.

The Green Light in Chapter 5

We return to the image of the light exactly halfway through the novel, in the fifth chapter , when Gatsby is showing Daisy around his mansion after he "accidentally" runs into her at Nick's house.

"If it wasn't for the mist we could see your home across the bay," said Gatsby. "You always have a green light that burns all night at the end of your dock."

Daisy put her arm through his abruptly but he seemed absorbed in what he had just said. Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one. (5.117-118)

This appearance of the green light is just as vitally important as the first one, mostly because the way the light is presented now is totally different than when we first saw it. Instead of the "enchanted" magical object we first saw, now the light has had its "colossal significance," or its symbolic meaning, removed from it. This is because Gatsby is now actually standing there and touching Daisy herself, so he no longer needs to stretch his arms out towards the light or worry that it's shrouded in mist.

However, this separation of the green light from its symbolic meaning is somehow sad and troubling . Gatsby seemingly ignores Daisy putting her arm through his because he is "absorbed" in the thought that the green light is now just a regular thing. Nick's observation that Gatsby's "enchanted objects" are down one sounds like a lament—how many enchanted objects are there in anyone's life?

The Green Light in Chapter 9

The last time we encounter the green light is in the final paragraphs of the novel.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby's wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy's dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter--tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning----

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past. (9.152-154)

Now the light has totally ceased being an observable object. Nick is not in Long Island any more, Gatsby is dead, Daisy is gone for good, and the only way the green light exists is in Nick's memories and philosophical observations. This means that the light is now just a symbol and nothing else .

But it is not the same deeply personal symbol it was in the first chapter. Check out the way Nick transitions from describing the green light as something "Gatsby believed in" to using it as something that motivates "us." Gatsby is no longer the only one reaching for this symbol—we all, universally, "stretch out our arms" toward it , hoping to reach it tomorrow or the next day.

You can read a more in-depth analysis of the end of the novel in our article on the last paragraphs and last line of the novel .

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Finally, as Gatsby's dream is dashed, the green light stops being something that is his alone, and instead takes on a universal quality . Now it stands for the unreachable dream that lives inside all people. For Nick, life is a constant struggle between our past mistakes, experiences, and sense of reality, which pull us back and weigh us down, and the green light of unrealistic hope that drives us to think we will do better and achieve more the next day.

The green light ends up standing for this dream of an "orgastic future" —that's right, that means a future lived at the height of orgasm—which is constantly getting farther and farther away, and that we keep trying to grab for, despite the impossibility of reaching it.

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Characters, Themes, Motifs, and Symbols Connected to the Green Light

Jay Gatsby . Gatsby is most closely associated with the green light. He is the one who obsessively stares at this light at the end of Daisy's dock, dreaming of reuniting with her. He is the one who reaches his hands towards it, showing us that it is a symbolic representation of his dreams that are always just out of reach. And he is the one whose belief in the green light and its promise of a future of perfect happiness so profoundly affects Nick that Nick ends up admiring Gatsby.

Daisy Buchanan . The green light is located at the end of Daisy's dock, and is Gatsby's only physical sign of her before he meets her at Nick's house. For a long time, the green light, Gatsby's ambitious hopes, and Daisy are all symbolically one and the same. Only when Daisy has an affair with Gatsby, showing that she is a flesh and blood person with her own desires, fears, and flaws, does she separate from this idealized symbol of hope.

Nick Carraway . Nick is the one who realizes the significance of the green light for Gatsby when he sees Gatsby stretching his arms out towards it. He is also the one who connects the green light with everyone's hopes and dreams at the very end of the book.

Society and Class. For Gatsby, just as Daisy is visible through the green light, but in reality out of reach, so is the old money contingent of wealthy Long Island society. No matter how high Gatsby rises and how rich he gets, he still can't break through that final barrier—and he can never quite grasp the green light.

The American Dream . The green light comes to represent not just Gatsby's dream, but the aspirational American Dream that the novel shows in both its positive and negative aspects. Like this national myth, the green light is forever just out of reach, but also forever motivating feats of improbable achievement.

Symbol : Colors. That the light is green is very significant in a novel that is methodically color-coded. Somewhat in opposition to its culturally positive associations, in The Great Gatsby, green tends to be a sign of either hopeful rebirth, or sickness, greed, and death.

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Essay Ideas and Tips for Writing About the Green Light

Now that we've explored the layers of meanings behind the green light at the end of Daisy's dock, you're in a good place to think about how to write about this symbol.

How to Write an Essay About the Green Light

Here are some tips on how to write an essay about the role of a symbol in a novel:

  • Build from the text out. In this article, I first looked at the green light in context and discussed its meaning in the exact places where it appears, and only afterward wrote about its general significance in the novel. The same basic rule of thumb is good to keep in mind for your own essay. Work from small ideas to big ones, and your argument will be well supported.
  • Make an argument. It's not enough to just describe the symbol and explain its possible meanings. Instead, you have to make sure that you're making some kind of point about why/how the symbol works. How do you know if you're making an argument and not just saying the obvious? If you can imagine someone arguing the opposite of what you're saying, then you've got an argument on your hands.
  • Don't overthink it. Sure, the green light can be said to represent lots of things: Gatsby's dreams, Daisy, or the quest to grab the elusive brass ring. But that doesn't mean that it also stands for world peace, environmental degradation, or Nick's pining for his war days. In other words, watch out for stretching your symbol analysis too far from what the text is telling you.

Essay Topic Ideas on the Green Light

Here are some possible essay arguments. You can build from them as-is, argue their opposite, or use them as jumping-off points for your own interpretation.

The green light is a kind of affiliation test for Gatsby. Those who imbue it with meaning like he does (like Nick) end up sympathizing with Gatsby; those who only see it as an object (like Daisy and Tom) are doomed to dismiss Gatsby also.

Gatsby's downfall starts at the moment when he stops seeing the green light as a symbol for his dreams and goals.

Ultimately, the green light means far more to Nick than to Gatsby.

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Green Light in The Great Gatsby: The Bottom Line

  • The green light is a permanently lit lamp that marks the end of Daisy and Tom's boat dock.
  • The image of the green light occurs:
  • At the end of Chapter 1, when Gatsby is reaching towards it and it is very mysterious.
  • In Chapter 5, when Gatsby and Daisy have reconnected, taking the symbolic meaning away from the green light
  • At the end of Chapter 9, when it transitions from being a symbol just for Gatsby and instead becomes a universal symbol of hope for the future.
  • The significance and symbolic meaning of the green lights shifts:
  • In the beginning of the novel, the light stands for Gatsby's dreams, hopes, and desires to reunite with Daisy.
  • During the course of the novel, Gatsby's dream is revealed to be delusional and unrealizable, so the symbolic meaning behind the green light collapses.
  • Finally, as Gatsby's dream is dashed, the green light stops being something that is his alone, and instead stands for the unreachable dream of an "orgastic future" that is constantly getting farther and farther away and that we keep trying to grab for.
  • The green light is associated with:
  • Jay Gatsby, who obsessively stares at this light at the end of Daisy's dock, dreaming of reuniting with her.
  • Daisy Buchanan, since the green light, Gatsby's ambitious hopes, and Daisy are all symbolically one and the same.
  • Nick Carraway, who is the one who realizes the significance of the green light for Gatsby and who connects the green light with everyone's hopes and dreams.
  • Society and class, the upper echelon of which is just as out of reach for Gatsby as the green light.
  • The American Dream, which is the aspirational hope that the novel shows in both its positive and negative lights.
  • Colors, which are very significant in this methodically color-coded novel.

What's Next?

Review where the green light appears to get a better sense of its context: Chapter 1 , Chapter 5 , Chapter 9 , explore the way the end of The Great Gatsby connects to its beginning through the recurring image of the green light and compare and contrast Nick and Gatsby to see what the different ways they relate to the green light says about them.

Want to get some of that green light into your own life? Get yourself some Gatsby accessories from our list of the 15 must-have items for every fan of The Great Gatsby .

Check out all the other symbols that enrich this novel.

Decide whether Gatsby primarily treats Daisy as an object , or whether he does have a sense of her as a person and loves her for herself .

Read along as we walk through other works of literature with our analyses of " Do not go gently into that good night " (Dylan Thomas), The Cask of Amontillado (Edgar Allan Poe), and The Crucible (Arthur Miller).

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Anna scored in the 99th percentile on her SATs in high school, and went on to major in English at Princeton and to get her doctorate in English Literature at Columbia. She is passionate about improving student access to higher education.

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The Great Gatsby

By f. scott fitzgerald, the great gatsby essay questions.

Analyze Fitzgerald's conception of the American Dream. Does he view it as totally dead, or is it possible to revive it?

Is Nick a reliable narrator? How does his point of view color the reality of the novel, and what facts or occurences would he have a vested interest in obscuring?

Trace the use of the color white in the novel. When does it falsify a sense of innocence? When does it symbolize true innocence?

Do a close reading of the description of the "valley of ashes." How does Fitzgerald use religious imagery in this section of the novel?

What does the green light symbolize to Gatsby? To Nick?

How does Fitzgerald juxtapose the different regions of America? Does he write more positively about the East or the Midwest?

What is the distinction between East and West Egg? How does one bridge the gap between the two?

In what ways are Wilson and Gatsby similar? Disimilar? Who is Nick more sympathetic to?

How does Fitzgerald treat New York City? What is permissable in the urban space that is taboo on the Eggs?

Is Tom most responsible for Gatsby's death? Daisy? Myrtle? Gatsby himself? Give reasons why or why not each character is implicated in the murder.

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The Great Gatsby Questions and Answers

The Question and Answer section for The Great Gatsby is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

The great gatsby

I'm not sure what your question is here.

On what page did Tom slap Myrtle in the beginning of the book?

Making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand. (pg. 30)

What is Gatsby doing when Nick first sees him?

When Nick first sees Gatsby, he is standing alone on his lawn looking out over the water towards the green light that marks where Daisy's home is.

Study Guide for The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby is typically considered F. Scott Fitzgerald's greatest novel. The Great Gatsby study guide contains a biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

  • About The Great Gatsby
  • The Great Gatsby Summary
  • The Great Gatsby Video
  • Character List

Essays for The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

  • Foreshadowing Destiny
  • The Eulogy of a Dream
  • Materialism Portrayed By Cars in The Great Gatsby
  • Role of Narration in The Great Gatsby
  • A Great American Dream

Lesson Plan for The Great Gatsby

  • About the Author
  • Study Objectives
  • Common Core Standards
  • Introduction to The Great Gatsby
  • Relationship to Other Books
  • Bringing in Technology
  • Notes to the Teacher
  • Related Links
  • The Great Gatsby Bibliography

Wikipedia Entries for The Great Gatsby

  • Introduction
  • Historical and biographical context
  • Plot summary
  • Major characters
  • Writing and production

the great gatsby chapter 4 essay

The Great Gatsby

Introduction to the great gatsby.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, one of the greatest American writers, wrote The Great Gatsby. It was first published on 10th April 1925 and did not win instant applause. However, later it became the most read American novel , read by a diverse range of audiences. As time passed, it impacted the American generations, proving an all-time bestseller and a masterpiece. The novel shows the regions of West Egg and East Egg near Long Island known for its prosperity during the Jazz Era after World War 1. The story revolves around the obsession of the millionaire, Jay Gatsby for a fashionable woman, Daisy. She is very popular among the military officers for her parties. On account of the exploration of a host of themes, the novel has been termed Fitzgerald’s magnum opus.

Summary of The Great Gatsby

The story of the novel, The Great Gatsby , revolves around a young man, Nick Carraway, who comes from Minnesota to New York in 1922. He is also the narrator of the story. His main objective is to establish his career in the bonds. Nick rents a house in West Egg on Long Island, which is a fictional village of New York. He finds himself living amidst the huge mansions of the rich and famous . Right across the water, there is a refined village of East Egg. Nick’s cousin Daisy and her wealthy husband Tom Buchanan live in that part of the village. Tom is known to be cruel, absurdly rich as well. One day Nick goes to meet Daisy and Tom for dinner. There, he meets Jordan Baker, Daisy’s friend. Daisy is a well-known golf champion. She tells him about Tom’s affair. Apparently, Tom has a mistress in New York City. Daisy secretly confesses to Nick that she is not happy with Tom. Once Nick returns to his house in West Egg, he sees his neighbor, Jay Gatsby. Jay is standing alone in the dark calling out to a green light across the bay. The place points to Tom’s and Daisy’s place.

After a few months, Tom introduces Nick to his mistress, Myrtle Wilson. Myrtle is married George Wilson, who is not as lively or joyful as Tom. According to Nick, George is “a valley of ashes”. He also compares George to an industrial wasteland supervised by Doctor T.J. Eckleburg. They meet her at the garage where George works as a repairman. Tom, Nick, and Myrtle go to her apartment in Manhattan. Myrtle’s sister and some other friends join them. As they are heavily drunk, they fall into an argument . Tom punches Myrtle in the nose when she talks about Daisy and insults her. Nick also wakes up in a train station.

A few months pass, Nick grows comfortable with the noises and lights of dazzling parties held at his neighbor Jay Gatsby’s house. Jay always has the famous and rich people gather on Saturday nights . There all the rich and famous enjoy Gatsby’s extravagant bar and enjoy listening to jazz orchestra. One day, Nick receives an invitation from Gatsby to one of these parties. There he meets Jordan and spends most of the evening. Nick notices that Jay is mostly absent during his parties. He overhears the guests talking about Gatsby’s dark past. Later, Nick meets him at the end of the party. While at first, he doesn’t know who Jay Gatsby was. Nick is properly introduced to Gatsby asking Jordan to speak privately. When Jordan returns she doesn’t share any details of the conversation between her and Jay Gatsby.

Nick becomes even more suspicious about this mystery character and decides to learn more about him through Jordan.  Nick continues to see Jordan Baker. He also gets acquainted with Jay Gatsby at the same time. During one of the drives for lunch in Manhattan, Gatsby tries to dismiss the rumors that has been reaching Nick. Jay tells Nick that his parents were very wealthy people and were dead. He studied in Oxford and discharged as a war hero after World War 1. Nick doesn’t believe Jay at this point. At lunch, Nick is introduced to Gatsby’s business partner, Meyer Wolfsheim. Meyer is known to fix the World Series in 1919. (This character was based on a real person and a real event from the author’s time). Nick meets Jordan Baker. She reveals Nick about her conversation with Gatsby. Gatsby knew Daisy, Nick’s cousin five years before. While he lived in Louisville, Jay and Daisy were in love. When Jay left to fight in the war, Daisy married Tom Buchanan. Gatsby bought his current mansion on West Egg to be across the water to see Daisy from distance.

Gatsby request Nick to invite Daisy to his house so that he can meet her. After a few days Jay Gatsby, invited by Nick, meets Daisy over tea. Daisy is surprised to see Gatsby after five years gap. Initially, they are quiet and hesitant, making the meeting extremely awkward. Nick observes this and leaves them alone for some time. He believes that by giving them a little privacy, they might talk and sort things out. Surprisingly, when Nick returns, Jay and Daisy speak without any uneasiness in the environment. Jay Gatsby is beaming with happiness; and Daisy is crying happy tears. Later, they head to Jay Gatsby’s mansion. Gatsby begins to show all his rooms and artifacts to her.

Few days pass, with Daisy and Jay Gatsby meeting frequently, Tom comes to know about Daisy’s meeting with Gatsby. He doesn’t like it. One day, Tom unwillingly attends Jay Gatsby’s party with Daisy. Daisy feels uncomfortable at the party. She is disgusted by the bad behavior of the rich crowd at West Egg. Tom assumes that Gatsby has a business of selling goods illegally. He accuses Jay Gatsby at the party and also shares his frustration with Nick after the party. Gatsby tries to ignore all the fight and asks Daisy to leave Tom. He begs her to tell the truth to Tom that she does not love him. Gatsby asks Daisy to marry him after they separate. He confesses that he had never stopped loving Daisy.

Right after that incident, Jay Gatsby stops throwing his wild parties. Daisy visits him almost every afternoon. One day, Nick is invited for lunch by the Buchanans. Jay Gatsby and Jordan are also invited. During the lunch, Daisy compliments Gatsby in front of everyone. This also proves as a declaration of her love for Jay Gatsby. Tom also notices Daisy but chooses not to react. He requests them to come to the town. Daisy and Jat Gatsby go to Tom’s car. However, Tom takes Jay Gatsby’s car with Jordan and Nick. Tom stops for the fuel at George Wilson’s garage in the valley of ashes. Wilson breaks the news to Tom that he had been planning to go west of the city with his wife Myrtle to raise more money.

Hearing the news Tom is visibly mad and speeds towards Manhattan. He catches up with Daisy and Gatsby. They go to a parlor at the Plaza Hotel, while Tom is still disturbed by hearing George’s and Myrtle’s moving news. While having a drink Tom confronts Gatsby about his and Daisy’s relationship. Daisy tries her best to calm them down. However, Gatsby begs Daisy to reveal the truth of their love. When Tom continues to threaten Jay Gatsy, Daisy threatens to leave Tom. Out of prejudice, Tom tells them that he had been investigating Gatsby. He concludes that Jay Gatsby was selling illegal alcohol at drugstores in Chicago with Wolfsheim. Gatsby denies the allegations and tries to diffuse the situation. However, Daisy loses hope. They leave the Plaza, just as Nick turns 30, without celebrating his birthday.

While returning, Daisy drives Gatsby’s car. On the way they accidentally hit Myrtle. Just before the accident Myrtle and George had a severe argument. She runs toward the street thinking Tom is still driving Gatsby’s car. While Jay Gatsby and Daisy see Myrtle they don’t stop. Daisy is afraid to stop and is caught by a couple of witnesses. Tom who is following them from Plaza stops his car after seeing the accident scene and the crowd on the road. Tom is shocked and heartbroken after seeing Myrtle’s dead body in Wilson’s garage. Wilson reveals to Tom that a yellow car was responsible for the accident. Tom tells that the car was not his and leaves to East Egg while mourning. When Nick sees Jay Gatsby at the Buchanans’ mansion he comes to know that Daisy caused the accident. However, Gatsby tells him that he will take the blame if his car is found. Jay also decides to be at Daisy’s house as a guard to protect her from Tom.

The next day, Nick asks Gatsby to disappear, as his car will eventually be traced. Gatsby refuses to leave. He reveals the truth of his past to Nick. Jay Gatsby was from a poor farming family and met Daisy while serving in the army in Louisville. As he was too poor to marry, he did use illegal methods to gain his wealth after the war. Proving that Tom was correct.

Nick returns for work unwillingly. Gatsby desperately waits for Daisy’s call. After a few days, George Wilson visits Tom at the East Egg. He tells him that Gatsby killed Myrtle. After revealing the new George barges into Gatsby’s mansion. Gatsby is relaxing by his pool when George shoots him and then turns the gun on himself. Nick is shocked and arranges Jay Gatsby’s funeral. Nick and Jay Gatsby’s father is the only audience at the funeral. Eventually, Daisy and Tom leave Long Island without revealing their new address. Nick returns to the Midwest and realizes that his life in the East was never good.

Major Themes in The Great Gatsby

  • The American Dream: The novel, Great Gatsby , presents the theme of the American Dream through its character of Jay Gatsby. When Nick meets him, he overemphasizes his lifestyle. He even desires to be in his parties and introduces him to Daisy when a chance arises. Therefore, Gatsby meets Daisy and tries to revive his past love, seeing that he has achieved fame through his riches and would get her now . However, Daisy disappears from his life after the accident. Nick with his American dream is the only friend in the end who arranges his funeral. The frequent uses of business and business jargon show the theme of the American Dream.
  • Home: The novel shows its theme of home through different characters. Nick leaves home and returns when he learns about the importance of home distinctively different from the mansions of East Egg and West Egg. Jay Gatsby, too, learns that mansions do not become home of a person. That is why he reverts to Daisy to set up a home but fails in his attempts.
  • Money: Money is not only an important theme but also a theme in the novel. Money brings a few characters close to each other. The discussion of places like East Egg and West Egg and new and old money shows that money makes the mare go for Nick, Tom, Daisy as well as Gatsby. However, by the end, Nick comes to know that money is not everything as he performs funeral rites of Gatsby alone with nobody else besides his dead body.
  • Materialism: Materialism is another significant theme of The Great Gatsby in that it shows its ravages and destruction where it is desired to be the most important value. The lush and extravagant parties, the mysterious and rich lifestyles, and extravagant shows of wealth do not go side by the side the sincerity of relations in the human world. Gatsby’s lifestyle attracts others, but nobody knows his mental condition, though, he fails to win Daisy by the end of the novel when meets his end, as she is already married.
  • Past: Past is a constant theme in the novel that Gatsby, Tom, and Daisy want to leave their past but it constantly haunts them. Gatsby has made remarkable progress in his life. Daisy and Tom have caused quite a scandal in their previous city of Chicago, the reason that they are running away from it. Jordan Baker also tries to bury her past life. Nick then clearly explains it to Daisy that he cannot bring back the past.
  • The hollowness of Upper Class: The novel shows the hollowness of the elite class or upper strata of the American society through the characters of Jay Gatsby as well as the region of East Egg as corrupt and devoid of the moral and ethical framework but West Egg as the social fabric tied in a morality. When Nick learns about Gatsby and Daisy, he reaches the conclusion by the end that all is rotten to the core.
  • Life and Death: Fitzgerald has presented the theme of life and death through the parties that are being thrown in the West Egg region in New York and through the character of Nick and Gatsby. However, it is Owl Eyes that shows the looming shadow of death amid life. Death is shown to end Jay Gatsby’s life of extravagance.
  • Love and Marriage: The novel shows two strained marriages of Tom with Daisy and Myrtle Wilson with George Wilson as bad examples of marriages. Although Nick and Gatsby are in search of love and they find it to some extent, this is not the real love but just a type of tender curiosity in Nick’s words.
  • Class: The novel shows the class system through different characters such as Gatsby represents the upper strata, for Nick is seeking to join this class despite his being form the middle class. The incompatibility of the marriage of Myrtle with George shows this class difference.

Major Characters in The Great Gatsby

  • Jay Gatsby: James Gatz or Jay Gatsby is the main protagonist , known for his mysterious past and extravagant lifestyle. His parties and mansion located in West Egg make other characters seek his attention and be invited to his parties. Later, he reveals the truth to Nick that he was a young man from a poor family and lived in Dakota. He made fortune after serving in WWI in the army and knew Daisy then. His love, though, stays unrequited until the end as Daisy gave importance to money. Though he amasses a vast fortune. George Wilson kills him by the end of having an affair with his wife. Though in reality, Daisy commits the crime and kills Myrtle, but Jay takes the blame upon himself.
  • Nick Carraway: Nick is the narrator of the story. He is from a rich family from Minnesota and wants to join the upper class of the society by joining the bond business in New York. Hence, he moves to the city. Nick is seen as an honest and responsible man. He joins Gatsby and Buchanan’s just to experience the East Egg society. Once, Nick gets close to Gatsby, he comes to know the truth and stands by him. When Gatsby is killed by George, he arranges his funeral and leaves East Egg for good.
  • Daisy Buchanan: Daisy Buchanan is Tom’s wife. In the past, she was with Gatsby while he was serving in World War 1. She leaves Jay Gatsby because of his financial status. Through her cousin Nick, she meets Jay Gatsby after five years. She kills Myrtle in an accident. She leaves Gatsby when takes the blame on himself to protect her. She is quite selfish and immature.
  • Tom Buchanan: Tom is a former soccer player from Yale and comes from an elite family. However, the brutal and deeply insecure, the reason that he often displays racism. He is dominating over his wife, Daisy, and condemns her for meeting Gatsby. While he disapproves, Daisy’s choice, he has a mistress, Myrtle. Tom is also a bully and a narcissist.
  • Jordan Baker: Jordan is a strong woman and Daisy’s old friend who once won golf tournament through deceit. However, unlike her friend, she is quite cold in manners and does not respond to Nick’s advances.
  • Myrtle Wilson: Myrtle is Tom’s mistress and promiscuous woman. She crosses social boundaries if she finds a chance. In her desperation, she marries George, the owner of a garage, but continues her affair with Tom. When she picks up a fight with her husband over the move, she runs to the street where speeding Daisy accidentally kills her. though Gatsby takes the blame.
  • George Wilson: A poor and lazy garage owner, George Wilson. He married ambitious Myrtle but faces agony and mental torture over her affair with Tom. He later murders Gatsby assuming Gatsby had killed Myrtle by accident.
  • Meyer Wolfsheim: Meyer is Gatsby’s colleague and famous for his involvement in the world of crime and fixing series. He is a mixture of morality and the criminal world and offers condolence on the death of Gatsby.
  • Dan Cody: Dan is one of those men who exploited the Gold Rush and won riches. Gatsby became his disciple and learned the art of making money but didn’t receive anything else. Though he left some fortune for Gatsby, it was taken away by his previous wife.

 Writing Style of The Great Gatsby ‎

Fitzgerald applies wry and elegiac which also includes sophisticated style in The Great Gatsby . The language, though, creates a sense of loss and nostalgia , becomes poetic, at times, loaded with figurative images. In one way, it seems to be an extended elegy that laments the corruption of a whole class merely for the abstract concept of a dream which is rotten to the core on account of greed, avariciousness, and lasciviousness that it breeds. However, when the novel shows metaphorical language and elaborate images, it seems highly sophisticated. Fitzgerald is an expert writer and knows where to apply what type of language.

Analysis of Literary Devices in The Great Gatsby

  • Action: The main action of the novel comprises Jay Gatsby yearning for Daisy’s affection. He took the blame for the accident and faced sequences as George Wilson kills him. The rising action comprises the reunion of Daisy and Gatsby, while the falling action is the death of Gatsby or maybe his final funeral rites.
  • Allegory : The Great Gatsby shows some strands of allegory in the character of Gatsby who is a symbol of something to be re-created through dreams . However, as a representative figure of every common American, Gatsby seems to have made it an allegory, for his dream of winning his love after having won a Gothic mansion and name in the parties proves a miserable failure.
  • Antagonist : Tom Buchanan is the antagonist of the novel, The Great Gatsby . He is not only an imposing figure but also a dominating man who represents obstacles that stand between a man’s desire and his attempts to reach his goal. He does not let Daisy and Gatsby meet to fulfill their desire of marriage after loving each other.
  • Allusion : Some of the allusions used in The Great Gatsby are such as a reference to Midas, a Greek legend , another to Morgan, an American financier, to Maecenas, an art patron of Rome, to Oxford, a university in England and to Rockefeller, a self-styled billionaire of the 19 th century.
  • Conflict : There are two types of conflicts in the novel, The Great Gatsby . The first one is the external conflict going on between Jay Gatsby and Tom Buchanan, the husband of Daisy how to dodge him to win his wife. The internal conflict goes in the mind of Gatsby about himself, about his love and renewal of relationship with Daisy.
  • Characters: The Great Gatsby presents both static as well as dynamic characters. The young man, Nick Carraway, the narrator is a dynamic character . He not only sees the entire situation but also sees his friends and near and dear ones in a wider perspective . His opinion also changes from good to bad by the end of the novel about different characters such as Tome, Jordan, and Daisy. However, Gatsby and Tom stays the same and does not show any change. Therefore, they are static characters .
  • Climax : The climax in The Great Gatsby takes place when the group of all of them is coming back from New York and Myrtle is killed by Gatsby. Then Gatsby shows greatness by taking the blame and getting killed by George.
  • Foreshadowing : The novel, The Great Gatsby , shows several examples of foreshadowing . Its fourth chapter shows the first such example when Nick sees that the gambler Wolfsheim is the friend of Gatsby which points to the means of his riches. The second example occurs when Jordan asks Nick that Gatsby wants to meet Daisy which clearly shows that he is going to rekindle his old love.
  • I’m p-paralysed with happiness.’ (Chapter-1)
  • The Flowers were unnecessary, for at two o’clock a greenhouse arrived from Gatsby’s, with innumerable receptacles to contain it. (Chapter-5)
  • ‘FIer family is one aunt about a thousand years old. (Chapter-1) All these three examples show good use of the literary device of hyperbole .
  • If personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures, then there was something gorgeous about him, some heightened sensitivity to the promises of life, as if he were related to one of those intricate machines that register earthquakes ten thousand miles away. (Chapter-1)
  • He wouldn’t say another word. His correctness grew on him as we neared the city. We passed Port Roosevelt, where there was a glimpse of red-belted ocean-going ships, and sped along a cobbled slum lined with the dark, undeserted saloons of the faded-gilt nineteen-hundreds.” (Chapter-4)

In the first example, the passage shows the description of a person while the second presents the description of Port Roosevelt. In both descriptions, Fitzgerald has used senses of sound, sight, and hearing extensively.

  • Metaphor : The Great Gatsby shows various metaphors throughout the novel. For example, 1. The lawn started at the beach and ran towards the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over sundials and brick walks and burning gardens. 2. Twenty miles from the city a pair of enormous eggs, identical in contour and separated only by a courtesy bay, jut out into the most domesticated body of saltwater in the Western hemisphere, the great wet barnyard of Long Island Sound. 3. “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The first metaphor compares the law to an animal , the second the places to eggs, and the last compares life to a voyage.
  • Mood : The novel, The Great Gatsby, shows a very serious mood that depicts pessimism and vapidity along with uselessness of the riches. It also becomes somber at the ugliness of the Valley of Ashes and the sad at the death of Gatsby.
  • Motif : The most important motifs of the novel, The Great Gatsby, are judgment, infidelity, and wealth which occur recurrently in the storyline.
  • Narrator : The novel, The Great Gatsby , has been narrated in a first-person narrative by Nick Carraway. It presents impressions of the place, society, and events from his personal point of view .
  • Half a dozen fingers pointed at the amputated wheel. (Chapter-3)
  • Blinded by the glare of the headlights and confused by the incessant groaning of the horns , the apparition stood swaying for a moment before he perceived the man in the duster. (Chapter-3)
  • The Dead dream fought on as the afternoon slipped away trying to touch what was no longer tangible. (Chapter-7) The first example shows fingers, second apparition, and the third dead dream as if they have lives of their own.
  • Protagonist : Although it seems that Nick Carraway is the protagonist, yet he is not. He is only the narrator. It is Jay Gatsby who is the real protagonist of the novel. It is because he demonstrates greatness by the end by telling truth to Nick, taking the blame on himself, and getting killed.
  • Paradox : The Great Gatsby, at the deep level, shows that Gatsby is a person of many paradoxes. He idealizes the American Dream and has become a gentleman to be liked. However, he has left this world with a single friend at his funeral.  
  • Rhetorical Questions: The novel shows the use of rhetorical questions in several places. For example, 1. What could you make of that, except to suspect some intensity in his conception of the affair that couldn’t be measured? 2. Who wants to go to town?’ demanded Daisy insistently. The first example shows the use of a rhetorical question posed by Nick that he does not want an answer. The second shows the same used by Daisy.
  • Theme : A theme is a central idea that the novelist or the writer wants to stress upon. The novel, The Great Gatsby , not only shows class, society, American Dream, and mortality but also demonstrates loneliness and the impacts of riches or wealth.
  • Setting : The setting of the novel, The Great Gatsby , is the city of New York and its Long Island with two fictional towns East Egg and West Egg.
  • Simile : The novel shows good use of various similes. For example, 1. Instead of being the warm center of the world, the Middle West now seemed like the ragged edge of the universe. (Chapter-1) 2. They (bonds) stood on my shelf in red and gold like new money from the mint. (Chapter-1)
  • The first simile compares the Middle West to a ragged edge, while the second compares the gold to new money.
  • Symbol: The Great Gatsby shows various symbols such as the green light, the clothes of Gatsby, and the Valley of Ashes as well as his car which shows that it is due to the new money that he has earned. Even the East Egg and West Egg or symbols of capitalism and materialism.
  • Irony : The novel shows irony in that, though, Gatsby is the center of attention of the parties, nobody shows up at his funeral except one person. The second irony is that Gatsby shows shyness when meeting Daisy despite his mundane success. The third example of irony is that Myrtle wants to die at the hands of Tom but it is Daisy who becomes her killer, for she was driving the car.

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88 Perfect Essay Topics on The Great Gatsby

the great gatsby chapter 4 essay

Welcome to The Great Gatsby Essay Topics page prepared by our editorial team! Here you’ll find a large collection of essay ideas on the novel! Literary analysis, themes, characters, & more. Get inspired to write your own paper!

  • 🔬 Literary Analysis
  • 🎭 Characters
  • 📊 Compare & Contrast
  • 🗺️ Navigation

🎓 References

🔬 literary analysis of the great gatsby: essay topics.

  • What are the literary devices used to create the image of Jay Gatsby?
  • Analyze how Fitzgerald uses imagery in The Great Gatsby.
  • The Great Gatsby: analysis and feminist critique
  • What do colors symbolize in The Great Gatsby?
  • How does Fitzgerald use geographical setting to show the contrast between social classes in the novel?
  • How does Fitzgerald convey a notion of the American Dream through metaphors and symbols?
  • What does the green light in Daisy’s window represent in The Great Gatsby?
  • What does the Valley of Ashes symbolize in The Great Gatsby?
  • What role does Nick Carraway’s narration play in the story? If we got it through an omniscient third-person narrator, what would we gain or lose?
  • Could the story have been set in other places, like Chicago or Los Angeles, or were New York City and Long Island absolutely necessary?
  • Look at the novel’s opening lines. If we accept Nick’s advice when we read the story, will our views of it change? Or, in other words, does refraining from criticism promote compassion?
  • Is there a hidden meaning of the title of The Great Gatsby? What is it?
  • How is the color white used within the novel? When does it make a false representation of innocence? When does it truly represent innocence?
  • Color symbolism in The Great Gatsby
  • What is the role of a New York setting in the novel’s storyline?
  • What is the real meaning of ‘great’ in the title of The Great Gatsby?
  • What significance do colors have in the party’s descriptions in chapter 3?
  • Why is Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby a satire?
  • Elaborate on the green light as the symbol of the American dream.
  • What is the meaning of the phrase “Can’t repeat the past?.. Why of course you can!” What does Gatsby really want from Daisy?
  • What role do the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg play in The Great Gatsby?
  • How is The Great Gatsby a satirical representation of the society?
  • Are the rich in the novel really so careless as everyone believes them to be?
  • Create an alternative ending for The Great Gatsby. Justify your choice.
  • What is the relationship between those born rich and those who became rich in the novel?
  • Fairy tale traits in The Great Gatsby

🎭 Essay Topics on The Great Gatsby’s Characters

  • Discuss female characters and their significance in The Great Gatsby.
  • Compare Gatsby and Wilson. In what ways are they similar?
  • Gatsby & Nick in The Great Gatsby
  • Who is the most responsible for Gatsby’s death? Why is it so?
  • Why do Tom and Daisy stay together at the end of the novel?
  • Does Gatsby’s money bring him real happiness?
  • Can Jay’s feelings for Daisy in The Great Gatsby be considered love?
  • How do secondary characters affect the story?
  • Daisy Buchanan: quotes analysis
  • Who is the real hero in The Great Gatsby?
  • Can we call Jay Gatsby a romantic hero or a villain?
  • What does Jay Gatsby really live for in the novel: the present or the past?
  • Compare Myrtle and Daisy.
  • Jay Gatsby & Tom Buchanan: compare & contrast
  • What does Tom’s quarrel with Myrtle in chapter 2 tell us about his personality?
  • Elaborate on how both Tom and Gatsby want to change not only the future, but the past in chapter 7.
  • What was Gatsby’s power of dreaming like? Was Daisy a worth object?
  • Is anyone to blame for Gatsby’s death?
  • Nick as the narrator in The Great Gatsby
  • Are there any moral characters in the novel?
  • Can Jordan and Daisy be considered perfect role models for the upper class in America? Why or why not?
  • Is Gatsby really great? In what way? How does his greatness evolve as the plot unfolds?
  • How does Nick’s character change over the course of The Great Gatsby?
  • Does Gatsby deserve the definition of a self-made man? Why or why not?
  • What role does Daisy play in the conflict between Gatsby & Tom?

🌻 Essay Topics on The Great Gatsby’s Themes

  • What are the central themes in The Great Gatsby?
  • What roles do fidelity and infidelity play in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby?
  • What importance does sex have in the story?
  • What role does alcohol play in The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald?
  • Did Fitzgerald really criticize the idea of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby?
  • Does love play have any importance in The Great Gatsby?
  • What role does the relationship between geography and social values play in the novel?
  • Francis Scott Fitzgerald & his American Dream
  • What is the meaning of time in The Great Gatsby?
  • How do the aristocratic East Eggers, Tom and the Sloanes, regard Gatsby in chapter 6? How is their contempt connected to the theme of social class in the novel?
  • Analyze The Great Gatsby through the prism of feminist theory.
  • How are the themes of kindness and compassion presented in The Great Gatsby?
  • Describe how the theme of ambition is presented in the novel.
  • Elaborate on how Fitzgerald contrasts education and experience in The Great Gatsby.

⌛ Essay Topics on the Context of The Great Gatsby

  • Describe how F.S. Fitzgerald’s life experiences influenced The Great Gatsby.
  • What are the examples of modernism in The Great Gatsby?
  • How does Fitzgerald represent the society of his time in the novel? Would you like to live in the Jazz era? Why or why not?
  • How is America shown in The Great Gatsby? What values do the East and the West represent?
  • How does Fitzgerald provide a critical social history of Prohibition-era America in his novel?
  • How is the economic boom of postwar America shown in The Great Gatsby?
  • Why did The Great Gatsby was neither a critical nor commercial success just after its publication? Why did its popularity grow exponentially several decades after?
  • How are racial anxieties of the time shown in the novel?

📊 The Great Gatsby: Compare & Contrast Essay Topics

  • Make a critical comparison of the novel with the 2013 movie.
  • Make a comparison of the novel with the 1949 movie.
  • Compare The Great Gatsby movies of 1949 and 2013.
  • Compare and contrast two classic American novels: The Great Gatsbyand The Grapes of Wrath.
  • Female characters in The Streetcar Named Desire & The Great Gatsby .
  • How are Donald Trump and The Great Gatsby’s Tom Buchanan alike?
  • Compare Miller’s Death of a Salesman and The Great Gatsby.
  • What other fictional or non-fictional character from a book or movie can Nick Carraway be compared to?
  • Jay Gatsby & Eponine from Les Miserables .
  • Make a critical comparison of The Sun Also Rises and The Great Gatsby.
  • Compare The Great Gatsby with A Farewell to Arms.
  • Make a comparison of Daisy from The Great Gatsby with Henrietta Bingham from Irresistible.
  • Love in The Great Gatsby & The Catcher in The Rye .
  • What pop stars of nowadays Daisy can be compared to?
  • Macbeth vs. Jay Gatsby: make a character comparison.
  • CS Topic Generator – Purdue Computer Science
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  • Literature Topics and Research // Purdue Writing Lab
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Study Guide Menu

  • Short Summary
  • Summary (Chapter 1)
  • Summary (Chapter 2)
  • Summary (Chapter 3)
  • Summary (Chapter 4)
  • Summary (Chapter 5)
  • Summary (Chapter 6)
  • Summary (Chapter 7)
  • Summary (Chapter 8)
  • Summary (Chapter 9)
  • Symbolism & Style
  • Quotes Explained
  • Essay Topics
  • Essay Samples
  • Questions & Answers
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Biography
  • Chicago (N-B)
  • Chicago (A-D)

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Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary

Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary

the great gatsby chapter 4 essay

The Great Gatsby  chapter 4 essay How does Fitzgerald tell the story in Chapter 4? Throughout the chapter Fitzgerald uses a variety of different disciplines to tell the story of Gatsby, Nick and the other characters. In chapter 4, Fitzgerald uses narrative voice to portray Gatsby’s mysterious nature. Gatsby’s description of his background to Nick is a daunting puzzle—though he rattles off a seemingly far-fetched account of his grand upbringing and heroic exploits, he produces what appears to be proof of his story.

Nick finds Gatsby’s story “threadbare” at first, but he eventually accepts at least part of it when he sees the photograph and the medal,

“He reached into his pocket, and a piece of metal, slung on a piece of ribbon, fell into my palm” – F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby Chapter

Nick also expresses his surprise at the validity in Gatsby’s story ‘to my astonishment the thing had an authentic look’ Fitzgerald has cleverly used symbolism to portray how Gatsby has to act in everyday life.

Gatsby and Nick travel through the Valley of Ashes at ‘great speed’, symbolizing Gatsby’s reluctance to be left in the middle, to not be on top in the wealthy part of New York anymore, as last time he was left he lost Daisy. They are stopped by police officers, who when shown a card by Gatsby leaves them alone, ‘Sorry Mr. Gatsby sir’ this shows the height of materialism and how the rich can easily manipulate the law due to their wealth. Fitzgerald uses this to introduce another discipline, Themes, through corruption.

In this Chapter Nick meets Gatsby ‘friend’ Meyer Wolfshiem, The luncheon with Wolfshiem gives Nick the impression that Gatsby’s fortune may not have been obtained honestly,

“I handed the money too…” – F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby Chapter

Nick perceives that if Gatsby has connections with such characters as Wolfshiem, he might be involved in organized crime or bootlegging. In contrast to this when Jordan tells Nick of Gatsby’s ‘other life’ before his illegally obtained wealth she presents him as a lovesick teenager with maybe slight obsessive tendencies, ‘Gatsby bought that house so daisy would be just across the bay’.

This adds an entirely new perspective for the reader as we now understand why Gatsby bought the house opposite the Buchanan’s and also why he was so interested in Nick when it appears they have nothing in common. This key feature in the chapter has been designed to evoke sympathy within the reader, a new emotion that has not yet before been presented in relation to the character of Gatsby. Now that Gatsby is a full-fledged character in the novel, the izarre inner conflict that enables Nick to feel such contradictory admiration and repulsion for him becomes known to us as Gatsby the lovesick soldier is an attractive figure, representative of hope and authenticity, Gatsby the crooked businessman, representative of greed and moral corruption, is the complete opposite. At the end of the Lunch when Nick goes to introduce Gatsby to Tom Buchanan, Gatsby has disappeared. Not only does this foreshadow the oncoming conflict

that will soon arise between Gatsby and Tom is also adds to the mystery surrounding Gatsby as a character, ‘I turned towards Mr Gatsby, but he was no longer there’.

A key symbolic feature in this chapter that reoccurs is the green light. Situated at the end of Daisy’s East Egg dock and barely visible from Gatsby’s West Egg lawn, the green light represents Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for the future. Gatsby associates it with Daisy, and in Chapter 1 he reaches toward it in the darkness as a guiding light to lead him to his goal. Because Gatsby’s quest for Daisy is broadly associated with the American dream, the green light also symbolizes that more generalized ideal.

Also the fact that the light is green, which is usually associated with ‘go’ foreshadows that Gatsby’s reconciliation with Daisy is growing close. The green light is one of the most important symbols in The Great Gatsby. Like the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg, the green light can be interpreted in many ways, and Fitzgerald leaves the precise meaning of the symbol to the reader’s interpretation. Many critics have suggested that, in addition to representing Gatsby’s love for Daisy, the green light represents the American dream itself.

This is representative of the key discipline that Fitzgerald uses throughout the novel, symbolism. Another discipline Gatsby uses in this Chapter is narrative voice, by having Nick narrate the story we gain a firsthand perspective whilst also understanding his opinions that our evolving about the other main characters. Throughout the chapter Nicks thoughts and views shape the novel. For example

“I was walking along from one place to another..” – F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby Chapter

  To conclude this chapter is arguably the most important in terms of symbolic features and Fitzgerald presents them in a way that they are most cleverly undetectable.

More about The Great Gatsby

  • The Great Gatsby Analysis
  • The Great Gatsby Character analysis
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  • The Great Gatsby Setting
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An adapted edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, at an easy-to-read level for all ages! ‘Go easy, Gatsby. You can’t repeat the past,’ I told him. ‘Of course I can. You’ll see,’ said Gatsby. Nick Carraway has moved to start a new life in New York. His neighbour is the mysterious Gatsby – a man who seems to have everything. But the thing he desires above all is his lost love. Daisy leads a joyless married life but will she be willing to leave it behind for Gatsby? Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald ; Adapted by: Lynne Wilson-Bailey Narrated by Saskia Coomber

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  1. 🏷️ Sparknotes gatsby chapter 4. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary and

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  2. The Great Gatsby: Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

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  6. The Great Gatsby

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  1. The Great Gatsby, Chapter 5: Audiobook

  2. The Great Gatsby

  3. [Reading]: The Great Gatsby Chapter 6 (F. Scott Fitzgerald)

  4. The Great Gatsby Plot Summary

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COMMENTS

  1. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

    Foreshadowing Metaphors & Similes Questions & Answers How does Nick Carraway first meet Jay Gatsby? Why did Daisy marry Tom? Why does Myrtle run out in front of Gatsby's car? How does Gatsby make his money? How are West Egg and East Egg different? What is the importance of the character Owl Eyes? Does Daisy love Gatsby or Tom?

  2. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

    The Great Gatsby: Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis Next Chapter 5 Themes and Colors Key Summary Analysis Nick observes some drunken women on Gatsby's lawn discussing Gatsby's mysterious identity, which includes all the usual rumors.

  3. The Great Gatsby

    Quotes Detailed Summary Nick notes that people—including Gatsby's party guests—continue to gossip about him throughout the summer, speculating about who he is and spreading various rumors. Nick notes all the famous people who graced Gatsby's parties that summer, then says that none of whom knew anything about their host.

  4. Best Summary and Analysis: The Great Gatsby, Chapter 4

    In The Great Gatsby Chapter 4, our narrator Nick gets a short private audience with one of New York's premier gangsters - Meyer Wolfshiem, Gatsby's business partner. But, just as Chapter 4 exposes the seamy side of get-rich-quick East Coast life, we also learn the origin story of Gatsby's love for Daisy.

  5. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary and Analysis

    Chapter Four At a Sunday morning party at Gatsby's, Nick hears further gossip about Gatsby from a group of foolish young women. They say that he is a bootlegger who killed a man who discovered that he was nephew to von Hindenburg and second cousin to the devil. One morning, Gatsby invites Nick to lunch in the city.

  6. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary and Analysis

    Chapter 4 Summary and Analysis. Last Updated July 13, 2023. Nick starts this chapter by listing all the guests who attended one particular party at Gatsby's. It's a fairly comprehensive list ...

  7. The Great Gatsby: Summary (Chapter 4)

    2,986 Gatsby is looking for friendship with Nick. He talks to Jordan, Daisy's friend and Nick's companion, alone. He tells her that he and Daisy were in love with each other some time ago and asks Nick to help them get together again. We will write a custom essay specifically for you for only 11.00 9.35/page 808 certified writers online Learn More

  8. The Great Gatsby: Mini Essays

    In a world without a moral center, in which attempting to fulfill one's dreams is like rowing a boat against the current, Gatsby's power to dream lifts him above the meaningless and amoral pleasure-seeking of New York society. In Nick's view, Gatsby's capacity to dream makes him "great" despite his flaws and eventual undoing.

  9. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

    45 pages • 1 hour read F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby Fiction | Novel | YA | Published in 1925 A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality Study Guides with detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, and more. Download PDF Access Full Guide Study Guide Summary

  10. The Great Gatsby Critical Essays

    Gatsby retains the American Dream in its purest form. A. He has the quality of the original seekers of the dream—the pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. III. He adheres to the precept of ...

  11. The Great Gatsby Full Text

    Chapter IV. On Sunday morning while church bells rang in the vil­lages alongshore, the world and its mistress returned to Gatsby's house and twinkled hilariously on his lawn. " He's a bootlegger ," said the young ladies, moving somewhere between his cocktails and his flowers. "One time he killed a man who had found out that he was ...

  12. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4

    In chapter 4, Fitzgerald uses narrative voice to portray Gatsby's mysterious nature. Gatsby's description of his background to Nick is a daunting puzzle—though he rattles off a seemingly far-fetched account of his grand upbringing and heroic exploits, he produces what appears to be proof of his story.

  13. How to Write a Compare/Contrast Essay for The Great Gatsby

    In a compare/contrast essay, you can't just present a list of similarities and differences. You also need to have an underlying argument you're supporting. Feel free to take these at face value or as jumping-off points for your own thoughts. Tom loves Daisy as a person, Gatsby loves her as an idea.

  14. The Great Gatsby: Suggested Essay Topics

    1. In what sense is The Great Gatsby an autobiographical novel? Does Fitzgerald write more of himself into the character of Nick or the character of Gatsby, or are the author's qualities found in both characters? 2. How does Gatsby represent the American dream? What does the novel have to say about the condition of the American dream in the 1920s?

  15. Best Analysis: Green Light in The Great Gatsby

    Green means go (stoplights were introduced in the 1910s-20s, so this was a relatively new association), green means spring, rebirth, and the start of new life. The positive meaning also works well with the idea of a dock light. Daisy is a beacon, pulling Gatsby out of the darkness and steering him in the right direction.

  16. The Great Gatsby Essay Questions

    The Great Gatsby is typically considered F. Scott Fitzgerald's greatest novel. The Great Gatsby study guide contains a biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. About The Great Gatsby; The Great Gatsby Summary; The Great Gatsby Video; Character List; Glossary ...

  17. The Great Gatsby

    The story of the novel, The Great Gatsby, revolves around a young man, Nick Carraway, who comes from Minnesota to New York in 1922. He is also the narrator of the story. His main objective is to establish his career in the bonds. Nick rents a house in West Egg on Long Island, which is a fictional village of New York.

  18. The Great Gatsby

    The Great Gatsby, novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, published in 1925 by Charles Scribner's Sons. Set in Jazz Age New York, it tells the story of Jay Gatsby, a self-made millionaire, and his pursuit of Daisy Buchanan, a wealthy young woman whom he loved in his youth.

  19. ‎The Great Gatsby (Easy Classics) on Apple Podcasts

    The Great Gatsby: Intro. An adapted edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, at an easy-to-read level for all ages! 'Go easy, Gatsby. You can't repeat the past,' I told him. 'Of course I can. You'll see,' said Gatsby. Nick Carraway has moved to start a new life in New York. His neighbour is the mysterious Gatsby - a man ...

  20. 88 Perfect Essay Topics on The Great Gatsby

    4 min. 3,051. Welcome to The Great Gatsby Essay Topics page prepared by our editorial team! Here you'll find a large collection of essay ideas on the novel! Literary analysis, themes, characters, & more. Get inspired to write your own paper! We will write a custom essay specifically. for you for only 11.00 9.35/page.

  21. Great Gatsby Chapter 4 Summary

    In chapter 4, Fitzgerald uses narrative voice to portray Gatsby's mysterious nature. Gatsby's description of his background to Nick is a daunting puzzle—though he rattles off a seemingly far-fetched account of his grand upbringing and heroic exploits, he produces what appears to be proof of his story.

  22. The Great Gatsby Chapter 4

    In chapter 4, Fitzgerald uses narrative voice to portray Gatsby's mysterious nature. Gatsby's description of his background to Nick is a daunting puzzle—though he rattles off a seemingly far-fetched account of his grand upbringing and heroic exploits, he produces what appears to be proof of his story.

  23. The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

    Hypocrisy and rot are at the heart of old money in the 1920s boom. Upon returning from dinner, Nick sees Jay Gatsby standing on his lawn and gazing out across Long Island sound. Nick considers calling out to Gatsby, but stops himself when he sees Gatsby extend his arms out toward the far side of the water.

  24. The Great Gatsby Quotes: Chapter 4

    The Great Gatsby Quotes: Chapter 4 | SparkNotes PLUS The Great Gatsby Study Guide Study Guide Mastery Quizzes Flashcards Full Book Summary Full Book Analysis Key Facts Video Summary Nick Carraway Daisy Buchanan Tom Buchanan Jordan Baker Myrtle Wilson George Wilson Literary Devices Themes Motifs Symbols Protagonist Antagonist Setting Genre Allusions

  25. ‎The Great Gatsby (Easy Classics): The Great Gatsby: Chapter 4 on Apple

    An adapted edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, at an easy-to-read level for all ages! 'Go easy, Gatsby. You can't repeat the past,' I told him. 'Of course I can. You'll see,' said Gatsby. Nick Carraway has moved to start a new life in New York. His neighbour is the mysterious Gatsby - a man who seems to have everything.