Writing Matters.

Yes, you know hundreds of Kanji, and you can read a newspaper or your favorite manga all the way to the end. But can you write? If you want to learn Kanji by writing or learn writing Kanji, this is your one-stop site for all the worksheets.

Download printable handwriting practice worksheets for Japanese Kanji by JLPT level, Grade Level, Wanikani Level, and Frequency. Every sheet is free, now and forever!

The Official Worldwide Japanese-Language Proficiency Test, operated by the Japan Foundation and JEES.

List of 1,026 kanji for japanese students in elementary school, from 1st grade to sixth grade., wanikani is a japanese radicals, kanji, and vocabulary learning web app that uses mnemonics and srs to make kanji learning simple., kanji garden, kanji garden is a free mnemonic-based srs kanji learning tool that features about 2600 kanji., kanji list ordered by the frequency they are used in the japanese language..

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RISU GAKUSEI

Risu Gakusei's Digital Hanko

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Currently, all the downloadable resources I have here are FREE   to download and use for personal and educational purposes.  

Loose Leaf Practice Grids

Click the PDF icon to download.

The best way to perfect your Japanese handwriting is by filling out practice grids!  The four sizes I have created are meant to grow with you as you learn to write.  

The largest grid is for those who are just learning to write kana or for practicing new kanji.  The middle two sizes allow for more characters for page and train you to write at a smaller, more natural size.  

The smallest size trains you to write beautifully in Japanese notebooks without having to loose the dotted lines (the "training wheels" of writing as I like to call them)! 

paper for writing kanji

Intermediate

paper for writing kanji

Note Training

Genkouyoushi   (manuscript paper).

paper for writing kanji

In Japan, assignments that are meant to be handwritten by students are almost always required to be completed on this paper.  Entrance exams are also done on this paper.

This resource is perfect for Japanese language teachers.  It is also great to practice on if you intend to study in Japan.

The 240字 size is great for beginner and lower intermediate level students while 400字 size is great for upper intermediate to advanced level students. 

Loose Leaf Notepaper

I've done my best to recreate two popular styles in which notebooks are printed in Japan. 

The first is made with "guide dots" that allow you to visuallize a box to write in.  The second reminds me of spread sheet paper (if you even know what that is).  The guides on this paper allow you to make notes in three font sizes.

These papers are great if you want to make notes in Japanese!

paper for writing kanji

Spread Sheet

Kanji alive

A free study tool for reading and writing kanji.

Welcome to  Kanji alive , a web application ( https://app.kanjialive.com ) designed to help Japanese language students of all levels learn to read and write  kanji .

Kanji alive: Detail view with kanji animation

Click for full-sized image

Kanji alive  is a resource for learning  kanji , dedicated to helping you open the door to the fascinating characters that form the written Japanese language. All of the content in the web application ( https://app.kanjialive.com ) was created and reviewed with painstaking attention to detail by experienced Japanese instructors in order to help you best study, practice and retain kanji .

Our Japanese language data and media files (images, sounds, animations, and fonts) are freely available to anyone for re-use under a Creative Commons license. In addition, developers can draw on our data for their applications from our free public API  and access the source code and contribute improvements  to the Kanji alive web application on GitHub.

Key Features of Kanji alive

search-kanji

A hand-written kanji animation

To help you write  kanji  correctly, all our kanji  animations are hand-written in the style experienced in common, daily use — with a regular pen, not a calligraphic brush or generated by a computer. The model animations can be paused and reviewed at any point, stroke by stroke, via their stroke order diagrams or by using the animation playback controls.  Read more  or  watch a demo video .

Radical field showing the image of the radical, its Japanese name, English meaning, stroke number, radical position, and an animation of its historical derivation

Detailed information on radicals

Learn how a radical lends meaning to its kanji. View an image of each kanji’s radical, its name, meaning, stroke number, historical derivation, and (for important radicals) its position in the kanji.  Read more  or  watch a demo video .

Mnemonic Hint

Mnemonic Hint

Next to each  kanji  you will find vivid mnemonic hints carefully crafted to help you associate the components of a  kanji  to its meaning.  Read more  or  watch a demo video .

Examples of common compound words and their translations

Examples of common compound words and their translations

See and hear how the  kanji  you are learning are used in context in up to twelve carefully selected example words, together with audio clips of their pronunciations by native male and female speakers.  Read more  or  watch a demo video .

read-kyokashotai

Recommended Kanji Dictionaries

Discover additional contexts and meanings for each kanji  and more example sentences via a custom web link to Kenkyusha’s online Luminous dictionary or by using the kanji reference numbers for the  Classic Nelson and Kodansha dictionaries.  Read more  or  watch a demo video .

Kanji alive is very easy to use. To quickly familiarize you with the  Kanji alive  web app ( https://app.kanjialive.com ) we have prepared a  User Guide , several short demo videos  and a handy Quick Reference guide in the app itself. Any of these resources can be used to learn how to use Kanji alive .  Japanese language instructors may also wish to read our  Notes for Instructors  which explain our pedagogic principles and design decisions.

Finally, especially for beginners, we have prepared two online resources which cover the history of  kanji , stroke order basics, and radicals. These are the  Introduction to Kanji  and the  214 traditional kanji radicals and their variants . We encourage anyone who has just begun to study  kanji  to review these documents carefully before using  Kanji alive  in earnest.

Thank you for your interest in Kanji alive! Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions or comments.

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A Kanji Writing Practice Strategy That Really Works

Ready to take your kanji writing practice from 0 to 60 in 15 minutes flat?

Then keep reading…

If you want to learn kanji ASAP, you need to practice:

  • Stroke Order

The more your kanji writing practice includes these four things, the better you’ll be able to remember the kanji when you need them most. Like on tests. Or when you’re writing that email to your new boss.

So let’s start with some kanji writing practice that covers these four basic bases…

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

The #1 Focus for Beginners: Stroke Order

The very first thing you need to learn is stroke order.

It’s fundamental.

To get up and running right now, grab your smartphone and…

Nab a stroke order app

Yes, they do exist. There are Japanese language-learning apps devoted exclusively to learning stroke order. The one I use is called Kanji Draw, by Lusil. There’s another one with the same name by Leafdigital.

Give them both a try and see which one works for you.

There are obvious advantages to practicing writing with an app . It’s free, you can pull out your phone any time you want to practice, and you don’t have to worry about pencil and paper.

But don’t rely only on apps.

Look for a kanji book

When you want lots of structure, find yourself a kanji practice book. There are lots of textbooks out there to help you learn kanji, but they don’t all help you learn stroke order.

Books such as Japanese Kanji Power   and Tuttle Learning Japanese Kanji are two examples of books that include stroke order. These types of books are great because they also give you some space to look at the kanji and practice it.

But if you have a mobile device, definitely nab an app, like Kanji Draw or JA Sensei . These apps not only show you the stroke order, but also the stroke direction.

And that’s just as important…

Find a kanji web app

Web apps such as Kanji Alive are designed to help you learn to read and write kanji. This app lets you search for kanji by meaning, grade, or you can input the character itself if you have a Japanese kanji input tool. It gives you the stroke order along with the meanings, phonetics, and definitions.

This app can be a useful reference when you want to look up a kanji and find out its stroke order.

FluentU takes authentic videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

You can try FluentU for free for 2 weeks. Check out the website or download the iOS app or Android app.

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When in doubt, get Japanese people to help you. They’re right most of the time, and can even teach you shorthand methods.

Got your apps and books ready to go?

Now let’s start with the kanji writing practice…

Kanji Writing Practice: My Ultimate Strategy

Let’s say you’ve got a bunch of kanji you want to practice.

What’s the best strategy?

I use what I call the 3-pile approach.

It’s simple. Create flashcards that have the kanji on one side and your learning objectives on the other: stroke order, kanji meanings, sounds, and so forth.

Here are a couple of tips to help you do this right:

  • Don’t bite off more than you can chew. Dip your toes in by only studying stroke order at first. Or maybe adding one or two other things…like the meaning of the kanji or the sounds.
  • Leave space on the back of the flashcard. Once you “graduate” from Stroke Order Academy, it’ll be time to add more stuff to the back of your flashcard. So save room for seconds…
  • When you’ve got your kanji list and are ready to practice, make one big pile .

Your Recipe for Success: The 3-Pile Approach

In a nutshell, here’s how it works: you go down through the pile you made and practice writing the kanji. Keep those that you got wrong in the same pile, then move the ones you got right into a new stack on the right.

You should have two piles. Now, go through both piles and repeat the process. Move the ones you got right to the right, and leave the ones you got wrong in the same stack. You probably have 3 piles now.

And …this is important…you can’t stop until you’ve pushed all the kanji to the right, through 3 piles into a 4th and final “finished” pile.

Why does this work? It forces you to keep practicing the ones you get wrong until you get them right a certain number of times. When you’re done, they’ll be in the “finished” pile all the way on the right side.

In case this is a little confusing, we’ll walk through the steps in detail.

Let’s say you’ve got 10 kanji you’re trying to learn before that big test on Friday. So you make one big pile.

Yes, that’s hardly going to make “1 big pile,” but anyways…

1. Put the pile in front of you, a bit to the left.

Pull off the top card, then write the kanji in your notebook once.

Look at the back of the card. Make sure you get the stroke order and the direction right.

Got it? Good.

Write it four more times in your notebook: good old-fashioned drilling . This helps you learn to write it the correct way.

2. Move the flashcard to a new pile on the right.

Keep going through the first pile until you get to the bottom.

Each time you get it right, write the kanji four more times, then move the flashcard one pile to the right.

Each time you get it wrong, write it four times the right way and leave it in the same pile.

Again, by keeping the ones you get wrong in the same pile, this forces you to try it again until you do get it right.

Practice makes perfect.

3. Once you’ve gone through all the kanji, start again at the first pile.

Now you get to try the kanji you got wrong.

And if you get it wrong again, leave it in the same place until you get it right.

Go through one pile at a time until all your kanji have been moved to the “finished” pile.

I suggest going through the “finished” pile one last time, then you can “graduate” these kanji to the next level.

And that’s it!

Pretty easy, right?

It seems simple, but this basic flashcard strategy will help you learn how to write kanji in no time.

You’re probably saying, “That’s not enough practice to actually memorize a character. I’ll just forget them tomorrow.”

And you’re probably right.

Now is a good time to put the kanji away for another day. Like tomorrow. When you come back to them again – in a few days or a week – repeat the process with more piles until you’ve internalized the kanji.

I call this the Stroke Order Academy .

So how many levels should you use for your Stroke Order Academy?

I use 3 levels and keep separate boxes for each level:

  • New:  Put completely new kanji into this level and move the kanji through 3 piles.
  • Medium:  Once a kanji has graduated from the “new” level, put it into another bin or box. Come back to these kanji a little bit later. And a little bit less often. I like to use 5 piles for this box.
  • Easy:  This is the last level! You want to make sure you really know your kanji before you stop practicing them, so use 7 or 10 piles for this level. But you’ve probably got these down, so just come back to them after a week or two.

How to Max out Your Learning with Your Flashcards

This 3-pile approach is a great way to practice writing kanji. But there’s a lot more to kanji than just stroke order…

Remember how I said to leave space on the back of your card to write more stuff?

Once you’ve got the hang of stroke order, you’ll be able to use this same strategy for building vocabulary , learning kanji sounds, kanji meanings, and so on.

Here are a few tips for maxing out the potential of your flashcards.

  • Don’t be afraid to “repeat a grade.” If a character graduates the Medium Level and still needs some work, send it through again. And again. And again. Until you get it.
  • Be systematic and disciplined. This type of approach will really work…if you put in the time. Set aside a certain number of hours per day or per week, then sit down with no distractions. Turn off cell phones and TVs.
  • Set goals. If you’re enrolled in a class, focus on the kanji you’ve got to learn for class. If not, pick a certain amount of kanji per day or per week, depending on how ambitious (or crazy) you are. Don’t go overboard or you’ll get overwhelmed.
  • Once you’ve got stroke order down, practice sounds, meaning, and vocab. The best way to do this is to add vocabulary to the back of a card – both compound nouns and verbs . This will help you learn on and kun readings, plus the meanings and vocabulary words.
  • Chunk out the kanji. I think it’s best to start with no more than 20 kanji. Keep your levels small and push those kanji through. When piles get too big, they’ll start to get scary.
  • Focus on the short-term. One good way to get discouraged is to focus on how slow you’re going. Don’t think about being able to read a Japanese newspaper or write a Japanese email just yet. It’s a recipe for losing heart. Keep your eyes on the kanji in front of you.
  • Create a reward system. Can’t stay disciplined? Trust me, I know how hard it can be. That’s why I like easy stuff like kanji apps. But another way to keep yourself on task is to create a reward system: don’t watch that anime until you’ve finished this set of kanji. Or give yourself a special treat each time your study session is done.

This simple method will help you learn to write kanji in no time. But if there’s anything that needs tweaking – by all means, tweak! There’s no one right way for everyone. If you need more piles or more levels, then throw them in there.

The most important thing is practice. Hopefully this approach will give you a little bit of structure and move your studies forward so you can ace that test or write that email.

And One More Thing...

If you love learning Japanese with authentic materials, then I should also tell you more about FluentU .

FluentU naturally and gradually eases you into learning Japanese language and culture. You'll learn real Japanese as it's spoken in real life.

FluentU has a broad range of contemporary videos as you'll see below:

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FluentU makes these native Japanese videos approachable through interactive transcripts. Tap on any word to look it up instantly.

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All definitions have multiple examples, and they're written for Japanese learners like you. Tap to add words you'd like to review to a vocab list.

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And FluentU has a learn mode which turns every video into a language learning lesson. You can always swipe left or right to see more examples.

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The best part? FluentU keeps track of your vocabulary, and gives you extra practice with difficult words. It'll even remind you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You'll have a 100% personalized experience.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

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Kanji Practice Paper: Modern 8 1/2 x 11" Notebook with 120 Pages of Blank Genkouyoushi Paper for Japanese Kanji, Kana, HIragana, and Katakana Writing Practice

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Petite Pomegranate Journals

Kanji Practice Paper: Modern 8 1/2 x 11" Notebook with 120 Pages of Blank Genkouyoushi Paper for Japanese Kanji, Kana, HIragana, and Katakana Writing Practice Paperback – February 11, 2019

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Practice writing Kanji, Kana, HIragana, and Katakana in this modern notebook filled with 120 pages of genkoyoshi paper. Each page contains 10 columns with 20 squares each (200 total per page) and each square is divided into four quadrants providing you with a guide for the correct sizing and positioning of the Japanese characters.

This lovely journal is generously sized at 8 1/2 x 11" and has a beautifully designed soft cover with a modern minimalist design style in an orange and coral color palette.

Know someone who is learning Japanese? This notebook would make a meaningful gift for kids and adults to use to practice their lettering.

Click on out author page above to see our colorful and cute selection of modern notebooks.

  • Print length 120 pages
  • Language English
  • Publication date February 11, 2019
  • Dimensions 8.5 x 0.28 x 11 inches
  • ISBN-10 1796612251
  • ISBN-13 978-1796612257
  • See all details

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Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Independently published (February 11, 2019)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 120 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1796612251
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1796612257
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 10.6 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 8.5 x 0.28 x 11 inches
  • #979 in Handwriting Reference (Books)

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Japanese Writing Practice

Kana writing practice sheets.

  • large – letter – a4
  • small – letter – a4

Kanji grouped by WaniKani Levels

  • All Levels 6 kanji per page a4 paper
  • All Levels 6 kanji per page - brush practice a4 paper
  • All Levels 8 kanji per page a4 paper
  • All Levels 4 kanji per page a4 paper

Large version has 4 kanji per page, medium has 6 and small has 8. Brush practice version has stroke order diagram as well as each kanji printed in a brush font so you can tell which sort of brush stroke is needed.

  • medium – letter – a4
  • brush practice – letter – a4
  • small – letter – [a4]

Grouped by JLPT level

All levels 6 kanji per page – a4 paper

All levels 8 kanji per page – a4 paper

medium – JLPT 5 – a4

small – JLPT 5 – a4

medium – JLPT 4 – a4

small – JLPT 4 – a4

medium – JLPT 3 – a4

small – JLPT 3 – a4

medium – JLPT 2 – a4

small – JLPT 2 – a4

medium – JLPT 1 (WK kanji only) – a4

small – JLPT 1 (WK kanji only) – a4

medium – JLPT 1 (complete – including non-WK kanji) – a4

small – JLPT 1 (complete) – a4

Calligraphy practice

A collection of two character combinations for praticing brush calligraphy. They are made with a beautiful calligraphic font written by calligraphy master Norio Nagayama. They include a stroke order diagram as well as a light example to trace and some spaces for practice. Included are some Buddhist terms as well as some other expressions and of course 鰐蟹!

Calligraphy practice – a4

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How to write kanji

When a student is taught kanji, one of the first thing that is explained to him is the concept of stroke order —the one and only correct way of writing kanji characters. Unfortunately, the reason behind it as well as the main rules are often left undiscussed.

Most students are left wondering about why they are supposed to learn one more characteristic for each of the already complicated character, and some of them decide not to follow any of the well established rules at all. In this article I’ll try to explain why it generally is important to use correct stroke order and what are the basic rules that should cover the majority of the kanji characters.

Why is kanji stroke order important?

First of all, unlike the Latin alphabet (or Cyrillic, for that matter) the Chinese characters and their Japanese deviations are always monospaced—each character occupies the same amount of space. When you combine this typographic rule with the often incredible amount of strokes involved, it becomes clear, why writing nicely looking characters may be so difficult.

Shodō (書道, Japanese calligraphy) is an art that was practiced for centuries in Japan and thus, the proper way of writing kanji is a very well researched topic. You may not believe it at first, but try writing the same kanji with different stroke orders and you’ll see the difference. Moreover, in Japan, an opinion about you may be formed based on your calligraphy. In the same way as by speaking improperly, your bad handwriting may make a bad impression on the others.

Secondly, stroke order is a great learning aid . Especially for some of the more complicated characters, one may forget how precisely a it character look, yet remember how to write it by following the correct order. This phenomenon is called motor memory and you probably already experience it in your every day life. Actually, neuromuscular facilitation is involved even in basic task like speech—one doesn’t think about complex tongue, lips, and other movements—and is the primary cause of accents.

At last, traditional paper kanji dictionaries are often organized by stroke order, and even if one decides to use computer handwriting recognition —be it a Tablet PC, a smartphone, or a dedicated denshi jisho (電子辞書, electronic dictionary)—it will work best if you use the correct stroke order.

FREE guide to learning kanji [+ an infographic! ]

Ok, so what are the guidelines?

1. top to bottom.

![Kanji stroke order – three](/blog/content/images/2015/07/san.png)

2. Left to right

![Kanji stroke order – river](/blog/content/images/2015/07/kawa.png)

3. Center strokes are written before wings

![Kanji stroke order – small](/blog/content/images/2015/07/chiisai.png)

4. Center strokes connecting to other strokes are written first

![Kanji stroke order – above](/blog/content/images/2015/07/ue.png)

5. Center strokes passing through other strokes are written last

![Kanji stroke order – inside](/blog/content/images/2015/07/naka.png)

6. Frames that enclose other strokes are written first, but closed last

![Kanji stroke order – map](/blog/content/images/2015/07/e-150×26.png)

7. Right-to-left diagonals are written before left-to-right diagonals

![Kanji stroke order – sentence](/blog/content/images/2015/07/bun.png)

Although there are many exceptions, you generally won’t go wrong if you follow these rules. As you’ll learn kanji, the stroke order will become more natural and—with the exception of tricky kanji like 凹 (おう, concave) or 凸 (とつ, convex)—you won’t have to think about it, or learn it kanji by kanji.

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Tired of wasting paper practicing your kanji? Try these reusable water-activated practice sheets

Japanese is a language that can be challenging to learn, especially depending on what your native language is. For example, learning Japanese as an English speaker requires a little bit of rewiring of the brain, as the order of grammar in Japanese is almost the opposite of English, and in addition to two phonetic alphabets there are also thousands upon thousands of kanji to learn.

While there are lots of unconventional and fun ways to learn conversational Japanese, like watching Netflix and practicing Japanese manzai comedy, the best way to learn kanji is probably the old fashioned way: to practice writing it over and over and over again until you’ve memorized how it looks in your head.

Calligraphy is a great way to practice writing kanji, but buying multiple sheets of calligraphy paper and pots of ink can get expensive. Luckily thanks to modern technology, you don’t have to waste countless sheets of paper for your kanji practice anymore. You can just use office supply maker Pilot’s new reusable water-activated penmanship practice sheet.

water-calligraphy3.jpg

Originally designed to comply with new elementary school curriculums that use water brushes to teach children kanji penmanship, these sheets were specifically released as school supplies for first and second year elementary school students. Truly, though, anyone needing to practice kanji can use them as long as you have a calligraphy brush and some water.

The sheets are made up of a top layer of water-activated color-changing material over dark grey synthetic paper. When the top layer is exposed to water, it becomes transparent, revealing the darker color underneath, making every stroke of a wet brush look like a real ink stroke. Once the water dries, the top later becomes gray again, effectively erasing the writing, which means you can use these sheets over and over again.

▼ The top layer of the sheets becomes transparent when activated by water, thus allowing light to penetrate it and reflect the darker grey color underneath for our eyes to see.

water-calligraphy2.jpg

They’re also purposefully designed to be like real calligraphy paper, so you won’t feel like you’re missing out on the authentic feeling of writing with brush and ink. The sheets even respond to the quantity of water on the brush, like paper would to ink; with more water, the strokes will be thicker, and with less, they’ll fade out. That means that even without ink, you can still get the subtle differences in penmanship that comes with writing with a brush.

Since the use of water instead of ink makes for easier cleanup, and less mess, these reusable practice sheets are also safer to use with children. And while there are other water-activated practice sheets on the market, most of them are made of real paper, instead of synthetic paper like Pilot’s, and thus are not as durable or reusable. Company tests revealed that Pilot’s sheets can be used over 10,000 times and still work just fine.

▼ The largest size even has grid lines to help you write a properly balanced character.

water-calligraphy4.jpg

The sheets come in different sizes (calligraphy paper size, A4 size, and B5 size), and each pack comes with two sheets, selling for 700 yen, 650 yen, and 550 yen respectively. You can buy them at Japanese office supply stores, department stores, and anywhere else you can buy stationary. They’re great for learning kanji strokes and patterns, and even if you’ve mastered kanji, you can use them to practice calligraphy, totally mess free.

Source:  Pilot  via  Netlab

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Watch this renowned Japanese calligrapher effortlessly write “the hardest kanji ever”【Video】

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I've been using similar items for the past 30 years (maybe even longer) so "new" hardly qualifies. Until one becomes skilled at calligraphy they are a great paper-saver.

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Tips to Improve Your Japanese Penmanship

paper for writing kanji

When studying the Japanese language, it’s more likely that you’re also practicing to write Japanese characters. And if you just started, you probably know how challenging it could be. There’s a big chance that your handwriting skills (using a pencil, a pen or a brush) are on the decline because of today’s digital advancements, which have made it easier for everyone to type characters instead of writing them. To avoid that, you need to practice and improve your Japanese penmanship.

Table of contents

Use a “Correct” Grip When You Write

Use an appropriate amount of pressure, write on the line, use the correct stroke order, write in boxes to practice, print a trace out and practice more.

paper for writing kanji

Kanji is used to write lexical elements such as nouns, verbs, and adjectives. Hiragana, which has rounded letter shapes, is used to write grammatical parts of sentences such as auxiliary verbs and suffixes of nouns. And Katakana, which has angular letter shapes, is used to write foreign words and for emphasis purposes.

There are rules for when to use these scripts, and there are many exceptions to it. Let’s take a look at some of these rules with some tips on how to improve your Japanese penmanship.

Improving Your Japanese Penmanship in General

paper for writing kanji

Sure, there are many ways to hold a pen, but there’s only one way to grip it correctly. To grasp a pen accurately, pick up the pen with your thumb and index finger. Your thumb and index finger will hold the pen in place. Grip the pen about lightly 1/3 of the way from its tip. Rest your middle finger under the pen and position your ring and pinky fingers underneath it.

With a proper grip like this, you can put less stress on the muscles and joints of your hand. Practice using this grip until it feels more natural to you.

A firm grip of the pen can help you write smoothly and maintain total control of your whole writing process. Apply a proper amount of pressure on your hold to transfer the ink properly to the paper. Make sure to balance your grip and the pressure so that the ink won’t splatter on the paper.

When practicing, don’t write on a blank sheet with no lines. Try to practice to write in sheets that have lines or grids. Writing on the line is also one of the best ways to keep the height characters the same.

Writing Kanji and Kana

paper for writing kanji

Writing with the correct stroke orders of Japanese Kanji and Kana is like writing proper English cursive. The two Kana scripts are simple. They both have a maximum of 4 strokes for each, while Kanji has many different strokes.

To write Kanji, you need to start your strokes from left to right and top to bottom. Make sure to do the horizontal strokes first before the vertical ones. But, there’s an exemption to this rule when a character has a vertical line with corresponding symmetrical characters. In that case, you write the vertical line first.

When writing boxes, you only need to do it with three strokes. Your first stroke is for the left vertical with an upward stroke, followed by the second stroke for the top horizontal to the right, and the last stroke for the downward right vertical and bottom horizontal to the left. Enclose contents on three sides first, do the inside contents then end it with the bottom stroke of the enclosure. Do bottom side enclosures last.

With diagonal strokes, do the right diagonal first before the left one. If the diagonal strokes cross, then do the right diagonal first before the left one. Also, strokes that traverse through a lot of other strokes go last.

Dots and dashes should always go last. The exemption to this is when the dot is at the very top. In that case, do the dot first.

There are many exemptions when it comes to writing Kanji characters, but be sure to follow these strokes to be sure.

Kanji characters, initially, are pictures of what they represent. But, when people started to use it often, it got confusing. Later on, they were written in squares to keep everything in uniform. With this, sheets with grid lines became one of the best tools to practice writing Kanji. You can also practice to write it in graph papers.

When practicing to write Japanese efficiently, start with writing the characters big. It will be easier for you to get comfortable first with the proper strokes to, later on, write them in a smaller format.

To make practicing the strokes easier, print a trace-out, and practice the strokes by tracing the lightly printed characters. You will master the strokes faster with this technique.

Improving your Japanese penmanship is an essential asset as a young professional, especially if you are not a local in Japan. We hope that this guide helped you on your way to mastering Japanese writing. Although you can learn it to greatly benefit your studies, you can also pick up the skill of mastering the art of Japanese penmanship.

paper for writing kanji

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See also kanji stroke order diagrams.

Kanji information used in this recognition system comes from the KanjiVG project . The kanji data is copyright (C) Ulrich Apel 2009-2018 and is used under the terms of a Creative Commons licence .

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A History of Moscow in 13 Dishes

Featured city guides.

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Moscow downtown historic district.

  • Location: Moscow Idaho Regional Essays: Idaho Latah County Architect: Robert H. Barton Leonidas McCartor Michael Shields William J. McConnell James McGuire Milburn Kenworthy Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

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Wendy R. McClure, " Moscow Downtown Historic District ", [ Moscow , Idaho ], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ID-01-057-0003 . Last accessed: February 20, 2024.

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According to historians who traveled throughout North Idaho at the turn of the twentieth century to interpret the early histories and future viability of the region’s towns, Moscow was a community where the early “pioneers got it right.” In 1903, visiting historians observed a thriving town in the center of a rich agricultural valley, where commercial development significantly outpaced resident population growth. They noted that, here, in contrast to other pioneer settlements, railroad companies accepted early settlers’ geographic choice for the town center rather than forcing the town to move the commercial districts to accommodate railroad interests. Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city.

Multiple conditions favored early Moscow’s capacity to achieve stability and prosperity as a business center during its formative years. The region’s geography was naturally accommodating of human habitation. For hundreds of years “Tatkinmah,” the “valley of the spotted deer” in which Moscow is located, served as a seasonal meeting grounds for tribal peoples including the Nez Perce, Coeur d’Alene, and Palouse, who frequented the area to harvest camas roots, trade, and race horses. Early settlers benefitted from ease of access to the region afforded by the Nez Perce Trail, which climbed two thousand feet from the tribe’s winter home in the Snake River Valley. In 1871, the first wave of homesteaders ascended the trail and claimed land in what they called “Paradise Valley,” a landscape of rich soil, bucolic grassy hills, and gently flowing streams. As farm families in pursuit of a permanent home, they brought early stability to the area and a need for a commercial marketplace. Moscow’s formative years also benefitted from the foresight and generosity of four homesteaders and businessmen (Almon Lieuallen, James Deakin, Henry McGregor, and John Russell), who each donated 30 acres of their intersecting claims to establish the initial townsite and commercial center. From the start, they established a climate for community stability by cultivating commercial enterprises along Main Street. Their motivations differed from those of fortunes seekers throughout the west, who temporarily populated, and exploited, early western settlements and then moved on.

Given its central location within a highly productive agricultural landscape, downtown Moscow quickly expanded from its humble beginnings into a booming regional marketplace for outlying communities and farmsteads. In 1885, the railroad arrived downtown, assuring Moscow’s role as a regional shipping point. Equally vital to the commercial district’s economic well-being, was the territorial legislature’s 1888 decision to locate the University of Idaho in Moscow. The combined economic stimuli afforded by agriculture, railroad linkage, and education produced downtown Moscow’s most significant period of commercial development. All downtown buildings constructed between 1888 and 1893 were either retail establishments or banks; over one-third of buildings designated as “contributing” to Moscow’s National Historic Downtown District were built in this period. Their developers, which included William McConnell, Robert H. Barton, and Michael Shields, were among Moscow’s most influential local businessmen. In architectural stature and purpose, these buildings remain unsurpassed by later periods of downtown development.

In 1891, William McConnell and his partner, James McGuire, erected the McConnell-McGuire Building, a three-story department store on the southeast corner of First and Main Streets. The physical heart of downtown during this period, however, developed at the intersection of Fourth and Main Streets, where a prominent commercial building was constructed at each corner between 1889 and 1891. All of the structures were built of brick, as required by an 1891 city ordinance regulating fire safety. The 1891 Skattaboe Block, originally constructed on the southwest corner of the intersection in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, was modified at the street level in the 1980s. The Hotel Moscow, a replacement building following a catastrophic fire in 1890, was also designed in the Richardsonian Romanesque style. Across the street on the northeast corner, Leonidas McCartor erected two mixed-use buildings in the Romanesque Revival style in 1891 and 1896, respectively. The 1891 building initially served as Farmer’s Bank before becoming Moscow’s City Hall in 1900, and it served in that capacity until the mid-twentieth century. Use of the Italianate style for downtown buildings was also relatively common as in the Shields Building on the intersection’s southeast corner. Michael Shields developed the Shields Building North as Moscow’s first three-story brick building with an elevator in 1889. The building has since lost some of its original ornamentation and has been modified at the street level.

Mirroring national economic trends, downtown development and construction activity paused during the economic panic of 1893. The national recession led to a slowdown in new construction and the upper floors of several department stores were converted from retail space to offices and apartments between 1893 and 1900. Main Street’s growth resumed in tandem with the country’s economic recovery. Twenty percent of the downtown district’s current inventory of buildings was built between 1900 and World War I. The majority are one- and two-part, block-style commercial buildings. They are smaller in scale and simpler in their detailing than buildings associated with downtown’s peak period. The Kenworthy Theater, a vaudeville and motion picture venue, is a notable exception. Between World War I and World War II, downtown continued to infill with brick and concrete block buildings designed in period-appropriate Art Deco and Spanish Mission styles. Both downtown movie theaters exhibit Art Deco influences and remain popular destinations for cultural entertainment and community events.

Typical of downtowns throughout the country during the post–World War II period, retail businesses and buildings along Moscow’s Main Street suffered from the erosive effects of highway traffic and shopping mall construction. A downtown revitalization initiative in 1980, featuring highway rerouting, streetscape improvements, and construction of a public plaza at the downtown’s core intersection at 4th and Main, helped to re-establish Main Street as a center for public life. The historic integrity of even the most prominent downtown buildings has been compromised, and many bear the marks of storefront modifications intended to forestall retail decline. Collectively, however, they provide a palimpsest of inherited culture and visitors to Moscow’s Main Street need only look up from street level at the brick buildings to connect with late-nineteenth-century community builders who had envisioned downtown Moscow as a bustling regional marketplace.

Attebury, J. Building Idaho: An Architectural History. Moscow: University of Idaho Press, 1991.

David, H. “Moscow at the Turn of the Century.” Moscow, ID: Local History Paper #6, Latah County Historical Society, 1979.

Hibbard, Don, “McConnell-McGuire Building,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1977. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, “Moscow Downtown Historic District,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2005. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Julin, Suzanne, and D. Krae, “Kenworthy Theater,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 2001. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Monroe, J. Moscow: Living and Learning on the Palouse , Charleston, SC: Making of America Series, Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Otness, L. A Great Good Country: A Guide to Historic Moscow and Latah County, Idaho . Moscow, ID: Local History Paper # 8, Latah County Historical Society, 1983.

Western Historical Publishing Company. An Illustrated History of North Idaho: embracing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai and Shoshone Counties, State of Idaho . Spokane, WA: Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903.

Wright, Patricia, “Hotel Moscow,” Latah County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, 1978. National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior, Washington DC.

Writing Credits

  • Location: Moscow, Idaho Regional Overviews: Latah County Architect: Robert H. Barton Types: mixed-use developments motion picture theaters hotels (public accommodations) apartments retail stores storefronts Styles: Romanesque Revival Richardsonian Romanesque Italianate (North American architecture styles) Spanish Colonial Revival Art Deco Materials: brick (clay material) cast iron sandstone dimension stone cast stone

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

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The History of Moscow City

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IMAGES

  1. Kanji Writing Practice Sheet: JLPT ...

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  2. 3-in-1 JLPT N5 Kanji Workbook: Japanese language for beginners: Kanji

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  6. Genkoyoshi Writing Paper. Kanji Practice Paper. Japanese

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COMMENTS

  1. Japanese Writing Paper: FREE Printable Blank Japanese Writing Sheets

    These blank Japanese writing paper templates are perfect for practising your hiragana, katakana and kanji. They're just blank grids, so you can copy whatever characters you're working on from your textbook or course, and write them out as many times as you need. I've made versions with and without an inner grid.

  2. Kanji.sh

    But can you write? If you want to learn Kanji by writing or learn writing Kanji, this is your one-stop site for all the worksheets. Download printable handwriting practice worksheets for Japanese Kanji by JLPT level, Grade Level, Wanikani Level, and Frequency. Every sheet is free, now and forever! JLPT

  3. RESOURCES

    240字 400字 Click the PDF icon to download. In Japan, assignments that are meant to be handwritten by students are almost always required to be completed on this paper. Entrance exams are also done on this paper. This resource is perfect for Japanese language teachers. It is also great to practice on if you intend to study in Japan.

  4. Kanji alive: A free study tool for reading and writing kanji

    Welcome to Kanji alive, a web application ( https://app.kanjialive.com ) designed to help Japanese language students of all levels learn to read and write kanji. Click for full-sized image Kanji alive is a resource for learning kanji, dedicated to helping you open the door to the fascinating characters that form the written Japanese language.

  5. Genkouyoushi Notebook: Large Japanese Kanji Practice Notebook

    Genkouyoushi Notebook: Large Japanese Kanji Practice Notebook - Writing Practice Book For Japan Kanji Characters and Kana Scripts Paperback - June 2, 2019

  6. What is the name of paper to train how to write kanji?

    What is the name of paper to train how to write kanji? Ask Question Asked 7 years, 9 months ago Modified 7 years, 4 months ago Viewed 3k times 2 I'm learning how to write hiragana, katakana and kanji. What is the name of paper that has little squares to write the Japanese characters? kanji word-requests genkōyōshi Share Improve this question Follow

  7. A Kanji Writing Practice Strategy That Really Works

    Ready to take your kanji writing practice from 0 to 60 in 15 minutes flat? Great! Then keep reading… If you want to learn kanji ASAP, you need to practice: Stroke Order Meanings Phonetics Vocabulary The more your kanji writing practice includes these four things, the better you'll be able to remember the kanji when you need them most.

  8. Amazon.com: Kanji Practice Paper

    日本人 Japanese Writing Practice Book: genkouyoushi paper notebook, Kanji Practice Notebook & Cornell Notes (8.5x11) Large 100 Pages - Traditional Sakura Painting by Kawaii genkouyoushi Kanji paper press | Sep 30, 2020 36 Paperback $499 FREE delivery Fri, Feb 16 on $35 of items shipped by Amazon Or fastest delivery Wed, Feb 14 Overall Pick

  9. Kanji Practice Paper: Modern 8 1/2 x 11" Notebook with 120 Pages of

    Kanji Practice Paper: Modern 8 1/2 x 11" Notebook with 120 Pages of Blank Genkouyoushi Paper for Japanese Kanji, Kana, HIragana, and Katakana Writing Practice: Journals, Petite Pomegranate: 9781796612257: Amazon.com: Books Books › Reference › Words, Language & Grammar

  10. Japanese Writing Practice

    All Levels 6 kanji per page - brush practice a4 paper. All Levels 8 kanji per page a4 paper. All Levels 4 kanji per page a4 paper. Large version has 4 kanji per page, medium has 6 and small has 8. Brush practice version has stroke order diagram as well as each kanji printed in a brush font so you can tell which sort of brush stroke is needed.

  11. How to write kanji

    At last, traditional paper kanji dictionaries are often organized by stroke order, and even if one decides to use computer handwriting recognition—be it a Tablet PC, a smartphone, or a dedicated denshi jisho (電子辞書, electronic dictionary)—it will work best if you use the correct stroke order.

  12. Here's a PDF printable I made a while ago for kanji practice ...

    Writing paper like this is called genkouyoushi - 原稿用紙. There are many sets out there once you know what to search for. Here's another set of patterns, including a page for kanji shodou practice with ten kanji selected for their stroke variety: 永 酒 何 有る 女 式 終 食 真 速. It says the standard is 10x20 spaces.

  13. Tired of wasting paper practicing your kanji? Try these reusable water

    Calligraphy is a great way to practice writing kanji, but buying multiple sheets of calligraphy paper and pots of ink can get expensive. Luckily thanks to modern technology, you don't have to waste countless sheets of paper for your kanji practice anymore. You can just use office supply maker Pilot's new reusable water-activated penmanship ...

  14. Writing tip for kanji beginners : r/LearnJapanese

    Hi, so I've been tutoring Japanese to people sometime now, and I noticed many people struggle with writing kanji neatly. And I can relate to that but also when I started writing kanji back in elementary school, I used notebooks that are specifically made for kanji practice (kanji renshu- cho-) which school will ask you to prepare for classes.

  15. Tips to Improve Your Japanese Penmanship

    Make sure to balance your grip and the pressure so that the ink won't splatter on the paper. Write on the Line. When practicing, don't write on a blank sheet with no lines. Try to practice to write in sheets that have lines or grids. Writing on the line is also one of the best ways to keep the height characters the same. Writing Kanji and Kana

  16. Can anyone recommend a good pen for practicing Kana/Kanji writing

    I personally use a fat 0.5 mm lead mechanical pencil similar to the link below. The 0.5 lead so far is my favorite for writing kanji because it's thin enough to make each line distinct. You can find a 2 pack at Walmart for like $4. Worth it, but I'd also recommend picking up a few packs of extra lead.

  17. PDF TJ japanese writing practice paper 15mm with grid

    TJ japanese writing practice paper 15mm with grid.pdf Author: Rebecca Shiraishi-Miles Keywords: DAFZ7_07hXE,BACCGdX5H3Q Created Date: 2/7/2023 11:56:53 PM ...

  18. Handwritten kanji search at sljfaq.org

    Handwritten kanji recognition. Draw a kanji in the box with the mouse. The computer will try to recognize it. The computer will write the top twenty kanji which it thinks match your drawing below. The best match is on the left. You can change where the links on the kanji go to on the Options page. See also kanji stroke order diagrams.

  19. 21 Things to Know Before You Go to Moscow

    1: Off-kilter genius at Delicatessen: Brain pâté with kefir butter and young radishes served mezze-style, and the caviar and tartare pizza. Head for Food City. You might think that calling Food City (Фуд Сити), an agriculture depot on the outskirts of Moscow, a "city" would be some kind of hyperbole. It is not.

  20. The Moscow Times

    Independent news from Russia

  21. Moscow Downtown Historic District

    Downtown Moscow has persisted as the symbolic heart of the community and center of public life. Its late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century buildings have adapted to changing needs over time and currently serve entertainment and housing needs of a university city. Multiple conditions favored early Moscow's capacity to achieve stability ...

  22. The History of Moscow City: [Essay Example], 614 words

    The History of Moscow City. Moscow is the capital and largest city of Russia as well as the. It is also the 4th largest city in the world, and is the first in size among all European cities. Moscow was founded in 1147 by Yuri Dolgoruki, a prince of the region. The town lay on important land and water trade routes, and it grew and prospered.