How to write a fantastic thesis introduction (+15 examples)

Photo of Master Academia

The thesis introduction, usually chapter 1, is one of the most important chapters of a thesis. It sets the scene. It previews key arguments and findings. And it helps the reader to understand the structure of the thesis. In short, a lot is riding on this first chapter. With the following tips, you can write a powerful thesis introduction.

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, which means I may earn a small commission if you make a purchase using the links below at no additional cost to you . I only recommend products or services that I truly believe can benefit my audience. As always, my opinions are my own.

Elements of a fantastic thesis introduction

Open with a (personal) story, begin with a problem, define a clear research gap, describe the scientific relevance of the thesis, describe the societal relevance of the thesis, write down the thesis’ core claim in 1-2 sentences, support your argument with sufficient evidence, consider possible objections, address the empirical research context, give a taste of the thesis’ empirical analysis, hint at the practical implications of the research, provide a reading guide, briefly summarise all chapters to come, design a figure illustrating the thesis structure.

An introductory chapter plays an integral part in every thesis. The first chapter has to include quite a lot of information to contextualise the research. At the same time, a good thesis introduction is not too long, but clear and to the point.

A powerful thesis introduction does the following:

  • It captures the reader’s attention.
  • It presents a clear research gap and emphasises the thesis’ relevance.
  • It provides a compelling argument.
  • It previews the research findings.
  • It explains the structure of the thesis.

In addition, a powerful thesis introduction is well-written, logically structured, and free of grammar and spelling errors. Reputable thesis editors can elevate the quality of your introduction to the next level. If you are in search of a trustworthy thesis or dissertation editor who upholds high-quality standards and offers efficient turnaround times, I recommend the professional thesis and dissertation editing service provided by Editage . 

This list can feel quite overwhelming. However, with some easy tips and tricks, you can accomplish all these goals in your thesis introduction. (And if you struggle with finding the right wording, have a look at academic key phrases for introductions .)

Ways to capture the reader’s attention

A powerful thesis introduction should spark the reader’s interest on the first pages. A reader should be enticed to continue reading! There are three common ways to capture the reader’s attention.

An established way to capture the reader’s attention in a thesis introduction is by starting with a story. Regardless of how abstract and ‘scientific’ the actual thesis content is, it can be useful to ease the reader into the topic with a short story.

This story can be, for instance, based on one of your study participants. It can also be a very personal account of one of your own experiences, which drew you to study the thesis topic in the first place.

Start by providing data or statistics

Data and statistics are another established way to immediately draw in your reader. Especially surprising or shocking numbers can highlight the importance of a thesis topic in the first few sentences!

So if your thesis topic lends itself to being kick-started with data or statistics, you are in for a quick and easy way to write a memorable thesis introduction.

The third established way to capture the reader’s attention is by starting with the problem that underlies your thesis. It is advisable to keep the problem simple. A few sentences at the start of the chapter should suffice.

Usually, at a later stage in the introductory chapter, it is common to go more in-depth, describing the research problem (and its scientific and societal relevance) in more detail.

You may also like: Minimalist writing for a better thesis

Emphasising the thesis’ relevance

A good thesis is a relevant thesis. No one wants to read about a concept that has already been explored hundreds of times, or that no one cares about.

Of course, a thesis heavily relies on the work of other scholars. However, each thesis is – and should be – unique. If you want to write a fantastic thesis introduction, your job is to point out this uniqueness!

In academic research, a research gap signifies a research area or research question that has not been explored yet, that has been insufficiently explored, or whose insights and findings are outdated.

Every thesis needs a crystal-clear research gap. Spell it out instead of letting your reader figure out why your thesis is relevant.

* This example has been taken from an actual academic paper on toxic behaviour in online games: Liu, J. and Agur, C. (2022). “After All, They Don’t Know Me” Exploring the Psychological Mechanisms of Toxic Behavior in Online Games. Games and Culture 1–24, DOI: 10.1177/15554120221115397

The scientific relevance of a thesis highlights the importance of your work in terms of advancing theoretical insights on a topic. You can think of this part as your contribution to the (international) academic literature.

Scientific relevance comes in different forms. For instance, you can critically assess a prominent theory explaining a specific phenomenon. Maybe something is missing? Or you can develop a novel framework that combines different frameworks used by other scholars. Or you can draw attention to the context-specific nature of a phenomenon that is discussed in the international literature.

The societal relevance of a thesis highlights the importance of your research in more practical terms. You can think of this part as your contribution beyond theoretical insights and academic publications.

Why are your insights useful? Who can benefit from your insights? How can your insights improve existing practices?

master thesis introduction chapter

Formulating a compelling argument

Arguments are sets of reasons supporting an idea, which – in academia – often integrate theoretical and empirical insights. Think of an argument as an umbrella statement, or core claim. It should be no longer than one or two sentences.

Including an argument in the introduction of your thesis may seem counterintuitive. After all, the reader will be introduced to your core claim before reading all the chapters of your thesis that led you to this claim in the first place.

But rest assured: A clear argument at the start of your thesis introduction is a sign of a good thesis. It works like a movie teaser to generate interest. And it helps the reader to follow your subsequent line of argumentation.

The core claim of your thesis should be accompanied by sufficient evidence. This does not mean that you have to write 10 pages about your results at this point.

However, you do need to show the reader that your claim is credible and legitimate because of the work you have done.

A good argument already anticipates possible objections. Not everyone will agree with your core claim. Therefore, it is smart to think ahead. What criticism can you expect?

Think about reasons or opposing positions that people can come up with to disagree with your claim. Then, try to address them head-on.

Providing a captivating preview of findings

Similar to presenting a compelling argument, a fantastic thesis introduction also previews some of the findings. When reading an introduction, the reader wants to learn a bit more about the research context. Furthermore, a reader should get a taste of the type of analysis that will be conducted. And lastly, a hint at the practical implications of the findings encourages the reader to read until the end.

If you focus on a specific empirical context, make sure to provide some information about it. The empirical context could be, for instance, a country, an island, a school or city. Make sure the reader understands why you chose this context for your research, and why it fits to your research objective.

If you did all your research in a lab, this section is obviously irrelevant. However, in that case you should explain the setup of your experiment, etcetera.

The empirical part of your thesis centers around the collection and analysis of information. What information, and what evidence, did you generate? And what are some of the key findings?

For instance, you can provide a short summary of the different research methods that you used to collect data. Followed by a short overview of how you analysed this data, and some of the key findings. The reader needs to understand why your empirical analysis is worth reading.

You already highlighted the practical relevance of your thesis in the introductory chapter. However, you should also provide a preview of some of the practical implications that you will develop in your thesis based on your findings.

Presenting a crystal clear thesis structure

A fantastic thesis introduction helps the reader to understand the structure and logic of your whole thesis. This is probably the easiest part to write in a thesis introduction. However, this part can be best written at the very end, once everything else is ready.

A reading guide is an essential part in a thesis introduction! Usually, the reading guide can be found toward the end of the introductory chapter.

The reading guide basically tells the reader what to expect in the chapters to come.

In a longer thesis, such as a PhD thesis, it can be smart to provide a summary of each chapter to come. Think of a paragraph for each chapter, almost in the form of an abstract.

For shorter theses, which also have a shorter introduction, this step is not necessary.

Especially for longer theses, it tends to be a good idea to design a simple figure that illustrates the structure of your thesis. It helps the reader to better grasp the logic of your thesis.

master thesis introduction chapter

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox!

Subscribe and receive Master Academia's quarterly newsletter.

The most useful academic social networking sites for PhD students

10 reasons not to do a master's degree, related articles.

master thesis introduction chapter

How to find a reputable academic dissertation editor

Featured blog post image for Minimalist writing for a better thesis

Minimalist writing for a better thesis

master thesis introduction chapter

Theoretical vs. conceptual frameworks: Simple definitions and an overview of key differences

master thesis introduction chapter

3 inspiring master’s thesis acknowledgement examples

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Dissertation
  • Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates

Published on June 7, 2022 by Tegan George . Revised on November 21, 2023.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical early steps in your writing process . It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding the specifics of your dissertation topic and showcasing its relevance to your field.

Generally, an outline contains information on the different sections included in your thesis or dissertation , such as:

  • Your anticipated title
  • Your abstract
  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review, research methods, avenues for future research, etc.)

In the final product, you can also provide a chapter outline for your readers. This is a short paragraph at the end of your introduction to inform readers about the organizational structure of your thesis or dissertation. This chapter outline is also known as a reading guide or summary outline.

Table of contents

How to outline your thesis or dissertation, dissertation and thesis outline templates, chapter outline example, sample sentences for your chapter outline, sample verbs for variation in your chapter outline, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis and dissertation outlines.

While there are some inter-institutional differences, many outlines proceed in a fairly similar fashion.

  • Working Title
  • “Elevator pitch” of your work (often written last).
  • Introduce your area of study, sharing details about your research question, problem statement , and hypotheses . Situate your research within an existing paradigm or conceptual or theoretical framework .
  • Subdivide as you see fit into main topics and sub-topics.
  • Describe your research methods (e.g., your scope , population , and data collection ).
  • Present your research findings and share about your data analysis methods.
  • Answer the research question in a concise way.
  • Interpret your findings, discuss potential limitations of your own research and speculate about future implications or related opportunities.

For a more detailed overview of chapters and other elements, be sure to check out our article on the structure of a dissertation or download our template .

To help you get started, we’ve created a full thesis or dissertation template in Word or Google Docs format. It’s easy adapt it to your own requirements.

 Download Word template    Download Google Docs template

Chapter outline example American English

It can be easy to fall into a pattern of overusing the same words or sentence constructions, which can make your work monotonous and repetitive for your readers. Consider utilizing some of the alternative constructions presented below.

Example 1: Passive construction

The passive voice is a common choice for outlines and overviews because the context makes it clear who is carrying out the action (e.g., you are conducting the research ). However, overuse of the passive voice can make your text vague and imprecise.

Example 2: IS-AV construction

You can also present your information using the “IS-AV” (inanimate subject with an active verb ) construction.

A chapter is an inanimate object, so it is not capable of taking an action itself (e.g., presenting or discussing). However, the meaning of the sentence is still easily understandable, so the IS-AV construction can be a good way to add variety to your text.

Example 3: The “I” construction

Another option is to use the “I” construction, which is often recommended by style manuals (e.g., APA Style and Chicago style ). However, depending on your field of study, this construction is not always considered professional or academic. Ask your supervisor if you’re not sure.

Example 4: Mix-and-match

To truly make the most of these options, consider mixing and matching the passive voice , IS-AV construction , and “I” construction .This can help the flow of your argument and improve the readability of your text.

As you draft the chapter outline, you may also find yourself frequently repeating the same words, such as “discuss,” “present,” “prove,” or “show.” Consider branching out to add richness and nuance to your writing. Here are some examples of synonyms you can use.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or research bias, make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

Research bias

  • Anchoring bias
  • Halo effect
  • The Baader–Meinhof phenomenon
  • The placebo effect
  • Nonresponse bias
  • Deep learning
  • Generative AI
  • Machine learning
  • Reinforcement learning
  • Supervised vs. unsupervised learning

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

When you mention different chapters within your text, it’s considered best to use Roman numerals for most citation styles. However, the most important thing here is to remain consistent whenever using numbers in your dissertation .

The title page of your thesis or dissertation goes first, before all other content or lists that you may choose to include.

A thesis or dissertation outline is one of the most critical first steps in your writing process. It helps you to lay out and organize your ideas and can provide you with a roadmap for deciding what kind of research you’d like to undertake.

  • Your chapters (sometimes subdivided into further topics like literature review , research methods , avenues for future research, etc.)

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

George, T. (2023, November 21). Dissertation & Thesis Outline | Example & Free Templates. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/dissertation/dissertation-thesis-outline/

Is this article helpful?

Tegan George

Tegan George

Other students also liked, dissertation table of contents in word | instructions & examples, figure and table lists | word instructions, template & examples, thesis & dissertation acknowledgements | tips & examples, what is your plagiarism score.

University of Leeds logo

  • Leeds University Business School
  • Research and innovation
  • Research and innovation blog

How to write an introduction chapter for a thesis

Louisa Hill is a Senior Teaching Fellow and delivers workshops for Postgraduate Researchers who want to teach.

Student in foyer

When writing a thesis, you will need to write an introductory chapter. This chapter is critical as it is the first thing that the examiner will read and it is therefore important to make a good first impression. 

A good introduction chapter should incite the reader to read the rest of the thesis by establishing the context of your topic, the motivation for undertaking your work and the importance of your research.

As a lecturer and supervisor, I have read many introductory chapters for research projects such as theses. Here is my advice to those undertaking a research project and writing a thesis.

Capture the reader’s interest

Initially you need to capture the reader’s attention with a discussion of a broader theme relating to your research. To add impact draw on research, data and quotations from international or national professional bodies, governmental organisations or key authors on the topic of study.

Give an overview of your research topic

Your discussion should then begin by detailing the broader aspects of the topic more, before focussing on the specific topic of your research. It is a good idea when you do this to assume that the reader knows nothing about your topic. Therefore definitions, drawing on key research, need to be clarified and explained. Alternatively, if having read key literature for the literature review chapter, you are not satisfied with existing definitions, then draw on these, to devise your own (but make it clear you have done this).

Detail how your research is going to make a contribution

You must then sell your idea for undertaking the research topic, demonstrating the main reasons why the research will make a significant contribution to the current body of research. This can be achieved by demonstrating a gap or limitation with existing research, then showing how your research will resolve this. There are different types of contribution (see  Constructing Research Questions: Doing Interesting Research ).

Explain what your interest is in the topic

Next you need to demonstrate your personal reasons for choosing the topic. These could relate to your previous research, work or experiences.

List your research objectives

You need to include your three or four overarching research objectives. Also include corresponding research questions if it is a qualitative piece of research or hypotheses if it is quantitative-based. The former are usually derivatives of the research objectives. Note though that these objectives and questions or hypotheses are fluid in nature and can be tweaked as you undertake the research.

Give a forthcoming chapter overview

The final part of the introduction is an overview of the rest of the chapters in the thesis. The other sections can go in any order, providing it is a logical sequence.

Learn from others

Look at other theses for example from  White Rose etheses  or your university library’s website. The majority of journal articles that you will read in the content of your topic will also provide useful insights.

Speak with your supervisor

Remember to always speak with your supervisor and have regular catch-ups. They will be able to offer guidance and encouragement, and steer you in the right direction.

Related content

  • Writing a research PhD proposal
  • Presenting with impact
  • The benefits of undertaking a placement alongside your PhD

If you would like to get in touch regarding any of these blog entries, or are interested in contributing to the blog, please contact:

Email: [email protected] Phone: +44 (0)113 343 8754

Click here to view our privacy statement. You can repost this blog article, following the terms listed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International licence .

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and may not reflect the views of Leeds University Business School or the University of Leeds.

  • Jump to menu
  • Student Home
  • Accept your offer
  • How to enrol
  • Student ID card
  • Set up your IT
  • Orientation Week
  • Fees & payment
  • Academic calendar
  • Special consideration
  • Transcripts
  • The Nucleus: Student Hub
  • Referencing
  • Essay writing
  • Learning abroad & exchange
  • Professional development & UNSW Advantage
  • Employability
  • Financial assistance
  • International students
  • Equitable learning
  • Postgraduate research
  • Health Service
  • Events & activities
  • Emergencies
  • Volunteering
  • Clubs and societies
  • Accommodation
  • Health services
  • Sport and gym
  • Arc student organisation
  • Security on campus
  • Maps of campus
  • Careers portal
  • Change password

How to Write a Thesis Introduction

What types of information should you include in your introduction .

In the introduction of your thesis, you’ll be trying to do three main things, which are called Moves :

  • Move 1 establish your territory (say what the topic is about)
  • Move 2 establish a niche (show why there needs to be further research on your topic)
  • Move 3 introduce the current research (make hypotheses; state the research questions)

Each Move has a number of stages. Depending on what you need to say in your introduction, you might use one or more stages. Table 1 provides you with a list of the most commonly occurring stages of introductions in Honours theses (colour-coded to show the Moves ). You will also find examples of Introductions, divided into stages with sample sentence extracts. Once you’ve looked at Examples 1 and 2, try the exercise that follows.

Most thesis introductions include SOME (but not all) of the stages listed below. There are variations between different Schools and between different theses, depending on the purpose of the thesis.

Stages in a thesis introduction

  • state the general topic and give some background
  • provide a review of the literature related to the topic
  • define the terms and scope of the topic
  • outline the current situation
  • evaluate the current situation (advantages/ disadvantages) and identify the gap
  • identify the importance of the proposed research
  • state the research problem/ questions
  • state the research aims and/or research objectives
  • state the hypotheses
  • outline the order of information in the thesis
  • outline the methodology

Example 1: Evaluation of Boron Solid Source Diffusion for High-Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells (School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering)

Example 2: Methods for Measuring Hepatitis C Viral Complexity (School of Biotechnology and Biological Sciences)

Note: this introduction includes the literature review.

Now that you have read example 1 and 2, what are the differences?

Example 3: The IMO Severe-Weather Criterion Applied to High-Speed Monohulls (School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering)

Example 4: The Steiner Tree Problem (School of Computer Science and Engineering)

Introduction exercise

Example 5.1 (extract 1): The effects of Fluoride on the reproduction of three native Australian plant Species (School of Geography)

Example 5.2 (extract 2): The effects of Fluoride on the reproduction of three native Australian plant Species (School of Geography)

Example 5.3

Example 5.4 (extract 4): The effects of Fluoride on the reproduction of three native Australian plant Species (School of Geography)

Example 5.5 (extract 5): The effects of Fluoride on the reproduction of three native Australian plant Species (School of Geography)

Example 5.6 (extract 6): The effects of Fluoride on the reproduction of three native Australian plant Species (School of Geography)

Well, firstly, there are many choices that you can make. You will notice that there are variations not only between the different Schools in your faculty, but also between individual theses, depending on the type of information that is being communicated. However, there are a few elements that a good Introduction should include, at the very minimum:

  • Either Statement of general topic Or Background information about the topic;
  • Either Identification of disadvantages of current situation Or Identification of the gap in current research;
  • Identification of importance of proposed research
  • Either Statement of aims Or Statement of objectives
  • An Outline of the order of information in the thesis

Engineering & science

  • Report writing
  • Technical writing
  • Writing lab reports
  • Introductions
  • Literature review
  • Writing up results
  • Discussions
  • Conclusions
  • Writing tools
  • Case study report in (engineering)
  • ^ More support

Study Hacks Workshops | All the hacks you need! 7 Feb – 10 Apr 2024

Reference management. Clean and simple.

How to write a good thesis introduction

master thesis introduction chapter

1. Identify your readership

2. hook the reader and grab their attention, 3. provide relevant background, 4. give the reader a sense of what the paper is about, 5. preview key points and lead into your thesis statement, frequently asked questions about writing a good thesis introduction, related articles.

Many people struggle to write a thesis introduction. Much of your research prep should be done and you should be ready to start your introduction. But often, it’s not clear what needs to be included in a thesis introduction. If you feel stuck at this point not knowing how to start, this guide can help.

Tip: If you’re really struggling to write your thesis intro, consider putting in a placeholder until you write more of the body of your thesis. Then, come back to your intro once you have a stronger sense of the overall content of your thesis.

A good introduction draws readers in while providing the setup for the entire project. There is no single way to write an introduction that will always work for every topic , but the points below can act as a guide. These points can help you write a good thesis introduction.

Before even starting with your first sentence, consider who your readers are. Most likely, your readers will be the professors who are advising you on your thesis.

You should also consider readers of your thesis who are not specialists in your field. Writing with them in your mind will help you to be as clear as possible; this will make your thesis more understandable and enjoyable overall.

Tip: Always strive to be clear, correct, concrete, and concise in your writing.

The first sentence of the thesis is crucial. Looking back at your own research, think about how other writers may have hooked you.

It is common to start with a question or quotation, but these types of hooks are often overused. The best way to start your introduction is with a sentence that is broad and interesting and that seamlessly transitions into your argument.

Once again, consider your audience and how much background information they need to understand your approach. You can start by making a list of what is interesting about your topic:

  • Are there any current events or controversies associated with your topic that might be interesting for your introduction?
  • What kinds of background information might be useful for a reader to understand right away?
  • Are there historical anecdotes or other situations that uniquely illustrate an important aspect of your argument?

A good introduction also needs to contain enough background information to allow the reader to understand the thesis statement and arguments. The amount of background information required will depend on the topic .

There should be enough background information so you don't have to spend too much time with it in the body of the thesis, but not so much that it becomes uninteresting.

Tip: Strike a balance between background information that is too broad or too specific.

Let the reader know what the purpose of the study is. Make sure to include the following points:

  • Briefly describe the motivation behind your research.
  • Describe the topic and scope of your research.
  • Explain the practical relevance of your research.
  • Explain the scholarly consensus related to your topic: briefly explain the most important articles and how they are related to your research.

At the end of your introduction, you should lead into your thesis statement by briefly bringing up a few of your main supporting details and by previewing what will be covered in the main part of the thesis. You’ll want to highlight the overall structure of your thesis so that readers will have a sense of what they will encounter as they read.

A good introduction draws readers in while providing the setup for the entire project. There is no single way to write an introduction that will always work for every topic, but these tips will help you write a great introduction:

  • Identify your readership.
  • Grab the reader's attention.
  • Provide relevant background.
  • Preview key points and lead into the thesis statement.

A good introduction needs to contain enough background information, and let the reader know what the purpose of the study is. Make sure to include the following points:

  • Briefly describe the motivation for your research.

The length of the introduction will depend on the length of the whole thesis. Usually, an introduction makes up roughly 10 per cent of the total word count.

The best way to start your introduction is with a sentence that is broad and interesting and that seamlessly transitions into your argument. Consider the audience, then think of something that would grab their attention.

In Open Access: Theses and Dissertations you can find thousands of recent works. Take a look at any of the theses or dissertations for real-life examples of introductions that were already approved.

How to make a scientific presentation

Academia Insider

How To Write A Thesis Introduction Chapter

Crafting the introductory chapter of a thesis can be confusing. If you are feeling the same, you are the at right place.

This post will explore how you can write a thesis introduction chapter, by outlining the essential components of a thesis introduction. We will look at the process, one section at a time, and explain them to help you get a hang of how to craft your thesis introduction.

How To Write A Good Thesis Introduction?

The opening section of a thesis introduction sets the stage for what’s to come, acting as a crucial hook to capture the reader’s attention.

Unlike the broader strokes found in the table of contents, this initial foray into your research is where you must distill the essence of your thesis into a potent, digestible form.

A skillful introduction begins with a concise preview of the chapter’s terrain, delineating the structure of the thesis with a clarity that avoids overwhelming the reader.

This is not the stage for exhaustive details; rather, it’s where you prime the reader with a snapshot of the intellectual journey ahead.

In crafting this segment, insiders advise adhering to a quartet of foundational sentences that offer an academic handshake to the reader.

First Section: I ntroduces the broad field of research, such as the significance of organisational skills development in business growth. 

Second Section: Narrows the focus, pinpointing a specific research problem or gap — perhaps the debate on managing skill development in fast-paced industries like web development.

Third Section: Clearly state the research aims and objectives, guiding the reader to the ‘why’ behind your study. Finally, a sentence should outline the roadmap of the introduction chapter itself, forecasting the background context, research questions, significance, and limitations that will follow.

Such a calibrated approach ensures that every element from the research objective to the hypothesis is presented with precision.

This method, a well-guarded secret amongst seasoned researchers, transforms a mundane introduction into a compelling entrée into your dissertation or thesis.

Background To The Study

This section sets the tone for the research journey ahead. The goal here is to capture the reader’s attention by threading relevant background information into a coherent narrative that aligns with the research objectives of the thesis.

To write a good thesis introduction, one must carefully describe the background to highlight the context in which the research is grounded.

This involves not just a literature review but a strategic presentation of the current state of research, pinpointing where your work will wedge itself into the existing body of knowledge.

For instance, if the research project focuses on qualitative changes in urban planning, the introduction should spotlight key developmental milestones and policy shifts that foreground the study’s aims and objectives.

When writing this section, articulate the focus and scope of the research, ensuring the reader grasps the importance of the research questions and hypothesis.

This section must not only be informative but also engaging. By the end of the introductory chapter, the reader should be compelled to continue reading, having grasped a clear and easy-to-understand summary of each chapter that will follow.

It’s a good idea to address frequently asked questions and to clearly state any industry-specific terminology, assuming no prior expertise on the reader’s part.

This approach establishes a solid foundation for the rest of the thesis or dissertation, ensuring the reader is well-prepared to dive into the nuances of your research project.

Research Problem

Crafting the nucleus of your thesis or dissertation hinges on pinpointing a compelling research problem. This step is crucial; it is the keystone of a good thesis introduction chapter, drawing the reader’s attention and setting the stage for the rest of your thesis.

master thesis introduction chapter

A well-defined research problem addresses a gap in the existing literature, underscored by a qualitative or quantitative body of research that lacks consensus or is outdated, especially in rapidly evolving fields.

Consider the dynamic sphere of organizational skills development. Established research might agree on strategies for industries where skills change at a snail’s pace.

However, if the landscape shifts more quickly—take web development for example, where new languages and platforms emerge incessantly—the literature gap becomes evident. 

Herein lies the research problem: existing strategies may not suffice in industries characterized by a swift knowledge turnover.

When writing your introduction, your goal is to clearly state this gap. A great thesis introduction delineates what is known, what remains unknown, and why bridging this chasm is significant.

It should illuminate the research objectives and questions, laying out a roadmap for the reader in a language that’s clear and easy to understand, regardless of their familiarity with the topic.

You’ll be able to capture and maintain the reader’s interest by effectively communicating why your research matters—setting the scene for your hypothesis and subsequent investigation.

Remember, a good thesis introduction should not only provide background information but also articulate the focus and scope of the study, offering a preview of the structure of your thesis.

Research Aims, Objectives And Questions

This pivotal section lays out the foundation by providing relevant background information, but it is the articulation of research aims, objectives, and questions that clarifies the focus and scope of your study.

The research aim is the lighthouse of your thesis, illuminating the overarching purpose of your investigation.

For instance, a thesis exploring skills development in fast-paced industries might present an aim to evaluate the effectiveness of various strategies within UK web development companies. This broad goal sets the direction for more detailed planning.

Research objectives drill down into specifics, acting as stepping stones toward achieving your aim. They are the tangible checkpoints of your research project, often action-oriented, outlining what you will do.

Examples might include identifying common skills development strategies or evaluating their effectiveness. These objectives segment the monumental task into manageable portions, offering a clear and easy way to write a structured pathway for the research.

master thesis introduction chapter

Equally critical are the research questions, which translate your objectives into inquiries that your thesis will answer. They narrow the focus even further, dictating the structure of the thesis.

For instance:

  • “What are the prevalent skills development strategies employed by UK web development firms?”
  • “How effective are these strategies?”

Such questions demand concrete responses and guide the reader through the rest of the thesis.

Significance Of The Study

The “Significance of the Study” section within the introduction chapter of your thesis or dissertation holds considerable weight in laying out the importance of your research.

master thesis introduction chapter

This segment answers the pivotal question: “Why does this research matter?” It is strategically placed after the background information and literature review to underscore the contribution your study makes to the existing body of research.

In writing this section, you’ll be able to capture the reader’s attention by clearly stating the impact and added value your research project offers.

Whether it’s a qualitative or quantitative study, the significance must be articulated in terms of:

  • Theoretical
  • Academic, and
  • Societal contributions.

For instance, it may fill gaps identified in the literature review, propose innovative solutions to pressing problems, or advance our understanding in a certain field.

A good thesis introduction will succinctly convey three main things: the research objective, the hypothesis or research questions, and the importance of your research.

It’s a good idea to provide your reader with a roadmap, foreshadowing the structure of the thesis and offering a summary of each chapter, thus enticing the reader to continue reading.

When you write the introduction section, it should also serve as a concise synopsis of the focus and scope of your research.

It’s often beneficial to include examples of introductions that clearly state the research objectives and questions, offering a snapshot of the whole thesis, and setting the stage for the rest of your thesis.

Limitations Of The Study

A thorough thesis introduction lays out specific research objectives and questions, yet it also sheds light on the study’s inherent boundaries. This is the purpose of the Limitation of The Study section.

The limitations section is not a confession of failure; instead, it’s a good idea to see it as demonstrating academic maturity.

Here, you clearly state the parameters within which the research was conducted.

For instance, a qualitative study might face scrutiny for subjectivity, or a quantitative one for potentially oversimplifying complexities. Other common constraints include the scope—perhaps focusing on a narrow aspect without considering variable interplay—resources, and generalizability.

For example, a study concentrated on a specific industry in Florida may not hold water in a different context, for example in Tokyo, Japan.

It’s essential to write this section with transparency. A good thesis introduction doesn’t shy away from limitations. Instead, it captures the reader’s attention by laying them out systematically, often in a dedicated paragraph for each chapter.

This honesty allows the reader to understand the research’s focus and scope while providing a clear and easy-to-follow structure of the thesis.

This approach also serves to manage the reader’s expectations. By preempting frequently asked questions about the scope of your research, the introductory chapter establishes a trust that encourages the reader to continue reading, aware of the contours shaping the body of research.

Thus, a well-articulated limitations section is not just part of the thesis; it is an integral piece of a responsibly woven research narrative.

Structural Outline Of Thesis, Thesis Statement

Within the thesis or dissertation, the structural outline section is akin to a compass, orienting the reader’s journey through the academic landscape laid out within the pages.

Crafting this section is a strategic exercise, one that requires an understanding of the work’s skeleton.

In essence, it’s the blueprint for the construction of a scholarly argument, and writing a good thesis necessitates a clear and easy-to-follow outline.

When you write a thesis outline, it’s not only about catching the reader’s attention; it’s also about holding it throughout the rest of the thesis.

This is where the structural outline comes into play, often beginning with an introduction chapter that presents the thesis statement, research objectives, and the importance of your research.

Following the introduction, a typical outline might proceed with Chapter 2, offering a literature review to acquaint the reader with existing literature and how this piece of research fits within it.

Subsequent chapters, each with a paragraph in the outline, detail the methodological approach—whether it’s qualitative or quantitative—and the research’s focus and scope.

A well-thought-out outline should also preview the structure of the thesis, succinctly:

  • Summarizing the main aim and objectives of each chapter, and
  • Indicating the type of data and analysis that will be presented.

This roadmap reassures the reader that the dissertation or thesis will cover the necessary ground in a logical progression, continuing from where the introduction first captivated their interest.

The structural outline is not only part of the thesis—it’s a strategic framework that informs the reader what to expect in each subsequent chapter.

Done correctly, this section allows the reader to understand the whole thesis in a nutshell and can often serve as a checklist for both the reader and the writer.

This ensures that the key stages of the research project are clearly stated and that the reader is provided with a roadmap to guide them through the detailed landscape of your scholarly work.

Write An Introduction Chapter With Ease

Mastering the thesis introduction chapter is a critical step towards a successful dissertation. It’s about striking a balance between engagement and information, presenting a snapshot of your research with clarity and intrigue.

Remember to start with a hook, establish the context, clarify your aims, and highlight the significance, all while being mindful of the study’s scope and limitations.

By adhering to these principles, your introduction will not only guide but also inspire your readers, laying a strong foundation for the in-depth exploration that follows in your thesis or dissertation.

master thesis introduction chapter

Dr Andrew Stapleton has a Masters and PhD in Chemistry from the UK and Australia. He has many years of research experience and has worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Associate at a number of Universities. Although having secured funding for his own research, he left academia to help others with his YouTube channel all about the inner workings of academia and how to make it work for you.

Thank you for visiting Academia Insider.

We are here to help you navigate Academia as painlessly as possible. We are supported by our readers and by visiting you are helping us earn a small amount through ads and affiliate revenue - Thank you!

master thesis introduction chapter

2024 © Academia Insider

master thesis introduction chapter

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, automatically generate references for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Dissertation

How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Introduction

Published on 9 September 2022 by Tegan George and Shona McCombes.

The introduction is the first section of your thesis or dissertation , appearing right after the table of contents . Your introduction draws your reader in, setting the stage for your research with a clear focus, purpose, and direction.

Your introduction should include:

  • Your topic, in context: what does your reader need to know to understand your thesis dissertation?
  • Your focus and scope: what specific aspect of the topic will you address?
  • The relevance of your research: how does your work fit into existing studies on your topic?
  • Your questions and objectives: what does your research aim to find out, and how?
  • An overview of your structure: what does each section contribute to the overall aim?

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Be assured that you'll submit flawless writing. Upload your document to correct all your mistakes.

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

How to start your introduction, topic and context, focus and scope, relevance and importance, questions and objectives, overview of the structure, thesis introduction example, introduction checklist, frequently asked questions about introductions.

Although your introduction kicks off your dissertation, it doesn’t have to be the first thing you write – in fact, it’s often one of the very last parts to be completed (just before your abstract ).

It’s a good idea to write a rough draft of your introduction as you begin your research, to help guide you. If you wrote a research proposal , consider using this as a template, as it contains many of the same elements. However, be sure to revise your introduction throughout the writing process, making sure it matches the content of your ensuing sections.

Prevent plagiarism, run a free check.

Begin by introducing your research topic and giving any necessary background information. It’s important to contextualise your research and generate interest. Aim to show why your topic is timely or important. You may want to mention a relevant news item, academic debate, or practical problem.

After a brief introduction to your general area of interest, narrow your focus and define the scope of your research.

You can narrow this down in many ways, such as by:

  • Geographical area
  • Time period
  • Demographics or communities
  • Themes or aspects of the topic

It’s essential to share your motivation for doing this research, as well as how it relates to existing work on your topic. Further, you should also mention what new insights you expect it will contribute.

Start by giving a brief overview of the current state of research. You should definitely cite the most relevant literature, but remember that you will conduct a more in-depth survey of relevant sources in the literature review section, so there’s no need to go too in-depth in the introduction.

Depending on your field, the importance of your research might focus on its practical application (e.g., in policy or management) or on advancing scholarly understanding of the topic (e.g., by developing theories or adding new empirical data). In many cases, it will do both.

Ultimately, your introduction should explain how your thesis or dissertation:

  • Helps solve a practical or theoretical problem
  • Addresses a gap in the literature
  • Builds on existing research
  • Proposes a new understanding of your topic

Perhaps the most important part of your introduction is your questions and objectives, as it sets up the expectations for the rest of your thesis or dissertation. How you formulate your research questions and research objectives will depend on your discipline, topic, and focus, but you should always clearly state the central aim of your research.

If your research aims to test hypotheses , you can formulate them here. Your introduction is also a good place for a conceptual framework that suggests relationships between variables .

  • Conduct surveys to collect data on students’ levels of knowledge, understanding, and positive/negative perceptions of government policy.
  • Determine whether attitudes to climate policy are associated with variables such as age, gender, region, and social class.
  • Conduct interviews to gain qualitative insights into students’ perspectives and actions in relation to climate policy.

To help guide your reader, end your introduction with an outline  of the structure of the thesis or dissertation to follow. Share a brief summary of each chapter, clearly showing how each contributes to your central aims. However, be careful to keep this overview concise: 1-2 sentences should be enough.

I. Introduction

Human language consists of a set of vowels and consonants which are combined to form words. During the speech production process, thoughts are converted into spoken utterances to convey a message. The appropriate words and their meanings are selected in the mental lexicon (Dell & Burger, 1997). This pre-verbal message is then grammatically coded, during which a syntactic representation of the utterance is built.

Speech, language, and voice disorders affect the vocal cords, nerves, muscles, and brain structures, which result in a distorted language reception or speech production (Sataloff & Hawkshaw, 2014). The symptoms vary from adding superfluous words and taking pauses to hoarseness of the voice, depending on the type of disorder (Dodd, 2005). However, distortions of the speech may also occur as a result of a disease that seems unrelated to speech, such as multiple sclerosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

This study aims to determine which acoustic parameters are suitable for the automatic detection of exacerbations in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by investigating which aspects of speech differ between COPD patients and healthy speakers and which aspects differ between COPD patients in exacerbation and stable COPD patients.

Checklist: Introduction

I have introduced my research topic in an engaging way.

I have provided necessary context to help the reader understand my topic.

I have clearly specified the focus of my research.

I have shown the relevance and importance of the dissertation topic .

I have clearly stated the problem or question that my research addresses.

I have outlined the specific objectives of the research .

I have provided an overview of the dissertation’s structure .

You've written a strong introduction for your thesis or dissertation. Use the other checklists to continue improving your dissertation.

The introduction of a research paper includes several key elements:

  • A hook to catch the reader’s interest
  • Relevant background on the topic
  • Details of your research problem
  • A thesis statement or research question
  • Sometimes an outline of the paper

Don’t feel that you have to write the introduction first. The introduction is often one of the last parts of the research paper you’ll write, along with the conclusion.

This is because it can be easier to introduce your paper once you’ve already written the body ; you may not have the clearest idea of your arguments until you’ve written them, and things can change during the writing process .

Research objectives describe what you intend your research project to accomplish.

They summarise the approach and purpose of the project and help to focus your research.

Your objectives should appear in the introduction of your research paper , at the end of your problem statement .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the ‘Cite this Scribbr article’ button to automatically add the citation to our free Reference Generator.

George, T. & McCombes, S. (2022, September 09). How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Introduction. Scribbr. Retrieved 19 February 2024, from https://www.scribbr.co.uk/thesis-dissertation/introduction/

Is this article helpful?

Tegan George

Tegan George

Other students also liked, what is a dissertation | 5 essential questions to get started, how to write an abstract | steps & examples, how to write a thesis or dissertation conclusion.

Thesis Writing

Writing A Thesis Introduction

Caleb S.

Thesis Introduction: A Step-by-Step Guide With Examples

11 min read

Published on: Apr 11, 2019

Last updated on: Jan 18, 2024

Thesis Introduction

People also read

Thesis Writing - An Ultimate Writing Guide With Tips & Examples

How to Write a Thesis Proposal - Sample Proposals and Tips!

Interesting Thesis Topics & Ideas To Get Started

Thesis Format Essentials: Structure, Tips, and Templates

Share this article

You're staring at a blinking cursor, trying to figure out where to start your introduction for your thesis writing. 

It's hard to know where to start, and even harder to keep your introduction engaging and on-topic.

We've written this guide that will take you step-by-step through the process of writing an amazing introduction. You'll also find examples of introductions for different types of papers.

So let's get started! 

On This Page On This Page -->

What is a Thesis Introduction?

A thesis introduction is the opening section of a research paper or thesis writing that serves as a roadmap for the entire study.

It provides context and background information for the research topic. The introduction outlines the study's purpose, problem statement, and methodology.

It engages readers, captures their interest, and sets expectations for the rest of the paper.

Importance of Writing a Good Thesis Introduction

Let’s see why a good introduction is important in thesis writing:

  • First Impressions: The introduction is your first opportunity to make a positive impression on readers. It's crucial in piquing their interest.
  • Contextual Understanding: It offers the necessary background information, ensuring that readers comprehend the research's significance and relevance.
  • Problem Statement: The introduction presents the research problem, outlining what the study aims to address, and emphasizing its importance.
  • Clarity: A well-structured introduction enhances the clarity of your work, making it easier for readers to follow your thesis.
  • Guidance: It serves as a guide for the reader, providing a clear path of what to expect throughout the research, including the methodology and expected outcomes.

How Long is a Thesis Introduction?

The introduction of your thesis paper makes up roughly 10% of your total word count. Therefore, a PhD thesis paper introduction would be 8000 - 10000 words. However, a Master's thesis would be 1500 - 2000 words long.

Although the thesis introduction length can be increased if the writer includes images, diagrams, and descriptions.

Components of Thesis Introduction

The thesis introduction format comprises several essential components that collectively set the stage for your research. These components include:

  • Hook or Attention-Grabber
  • Background Information
  • Problem Statement
  • Purpose of the Study
  • Significance of the Research
  • Overview of the Methodology

Thesis Introduction Outline

A thesis introduction chapter structure contains the following sections:

Thesis Introduction Outline Sample

Order Essay

Paper Due? Why Suffer? That's our Job!

How to Start a Thesis Introduction?

Starting a thesis introduction can be overwhelming, but there are some steps you can follow to make it easier:

  • Choose a Topic Select a topic that you are passionate about and that aligns with your research interests. Your topic should also be relevant to your field of study and have enough existing research to support your thesis. You can also choose unique ideas from our compiled list of thesis topics .
  • Research the Content Conduct thorough research on your topic by reviewing the literature, collecting data, and analyzing existing research in your field. This will help you identify gaps in the literature that your thesis will address.
  • Organize the Ideas Organize and compile the main arguments, ideas, and claims in the next step. These thoughts will be helpful to describe and present the thesis statement . Logically organizing your thoughts is crucial for developing an effective and coherent paper. You can create a clear story from the start of your paper to the end. Also, include a table of contents at the beginning of your thesis. It serves as a mind map to discuss the layout of your research proposal .
  • Define the Subject and Relevant Themes Define the subject and the relevant themes before starting your thesis introduction. The subject of a thesis is the central topic or idea that it addresses. It should be specific enough to be covered by the scope of the thesis, yet broad enough to allow for meaningful discussion. Relevant themes are those ideas that are most applicable to the subject of the thesis. These themes often come from other fields and add depth to the argument being made in the thesis. This way it would be easier for the reader to skim and get a good idea by going through it.
  • Define Your Thesis Statement Once you have conducted your research, define your thesis statement. Your thesis statement should clearly articulate the main argument or point you will be making in your thesis.

Check out this video to learn more about writing a good introduction for your thesis!

How to Write a Thesis Introduction?

Once you are done with the prewriting steps discussed above, you are now ready to dive into actual writing. Here is a step-by-step guide for you to follow while writing a thesis introduction.  

Steps to write a thesis introduction - MyPerfectWords.com

A detailed description of the steps to write an introduction is given below.

Step 1: Hook the Reader’s Interest

A writer should begin writing the introduction with a hook statement to draw the reader’s interest. It can be a question, quotation, or interesting transitions into your arguments.  Also, make a list of interesting, current events or controversies related to your topic. It will help in creating a strong introduction and thesis statement.

Step 2: Mention the Research Gap

Review and evaluate the existing literature critically. It will help the researcher in finding and addressing the research gap. 

Step 3: State the Background Information

A good introduction to the thesis always states the historical background of the chosen topic. It is usually cited in the first paragraph and shows the current position of the subject.   

Step 4: Back Your Topic with Relevant Literature

The introduction is a mix of previous research and a literature review. Thus, the topic should be backed with relevant resources.  It is also used to explain the context and significance of previous studies. Moreover, it further acknowledges credible sources of information to solidify your claim.

When choosing relevant literature, there are a few things to consider. 

  • Firstly, the literature should be from reputable sources such as scholarly journals or books. 
  • Secondly, it should be related to your topic and provide evidence for your claims. 
  • Lastly, it should be up-to-date and accurate. 

By taking these factors into account, you can ensure that your work is well-informed and credible.

Step 5: Mention the Hypothesis

Formulate a hypothesis for your research work. It will discuss what you aim to achieve along with the possibilities.

A valid hypothesis must be testable, measurable, and based on evidence from existing literature or theoretical frameworks. 

The hypothesis should also provide a logical explanation for the relationship between the variables in question.

Step 6: Provide Significance of Your Research

The gap will help to evaluate the situation and explain the significance of the current research. Thus, add the purpose of your paper explaining why the research is done. It will also demonstrate the possible contributions of the research work in the future.

Step 7: Outline the Research Questions

The next step is to outline your research questions. These should be relevant to the purpose of your study. Moreover, it will also help you discuss the problems that you seek to address. 

Step 8: State Research Objectives

State the research aims and objectives to define the primary purpose of the work. It should give a direction to the research by providing an overview of what it aims to achieve.

Step 9: Discuss the Research Methodology

The next step is to define the terms and methodology you are going to apply in your research. It is a good technique to make your study authentic, credible, and useful.

Step 10: Finalize your Introduction

Ask yourself the following questions after finishing writing the introduction.

  • Does your introduction discuss the problem your thesis is addressing?
  • Does this section address the contribution the research work is making?
  • Does it provide a detailed overview of your thesis?
  • Does it end by briefly discussing the content of each chapter?
  • Does it make a case for the research?
  • Does it outline research questions, problems, and hypotheses clearly?

Thesis Introduction Examples

Below are sample thesis introductions to help you compose perfect introductions.

Ph.D. thesis introduction

Master thesis introduction example

Bachelor thesis introduction example

Thesis introduction sample for criminology

Thesis Introduction Writing Tips

The following are some writing tips to help you draft perfect thesis introductions.

  • Highlight the importance of your research early on to engage the reader's interest.
  • Introduce the key aspects of the topic to provide context and understanding.
  • Craft a dissertation introduction that clearly sets the stage for your research.
  • Offer a concise overview of the structure to help the reader navigate your thesis effectively.
  • It must follow a coherent thesis format by providing concise information.
  • Do not use technical language as it will leave the reader confused.

Tough Essay Due? Hire Tough Writers!

 Introduction Writing Checklist

Use the below checklist to assess your introduction and identify what information is missing. This should help you ensure that your intro has all of the necessary components for a successful outcome.

In conclusion, crafting a strong thesis introduction is a crucial element of any academic paper. It sets the tone for your entire essay and provides a roadmap for your reader to follow. By following the steps outlined in this blog post, you can create a well-structured introduction for your thesis. 

However, if you are still struggling to write a compelling thesis introduction, don't worry. MyPerfectWords.com is here to help. With qualified writing experts, we provide the best thesis writing service at student-friendly costs. 

So, contact us today to discuss your thesis paper, and let us help you achieve your academic goals. Using our online paper writing service , you can be confident that your thesis introduction will be crafted perfectly to help you succeed.

Caleb S. (Literature, Marketing)

Caleb S. has been providing writing services for over five years and has a Masters degree from Oxford University. He is an expert in his craft and takes great pride in helping students achieve their academic goals. Caleb is a dedicated professional who always puts his clients first.

Paper Due? Why Suffer? That’s our Job!

Get Help

Keep reading

Thesis Introduction

We value your privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience and give you personalized content. Do you agree to our cookie policy?

Website Data Collection

We use data collected by cookies and JavaScript libraries.

Are you sure you want to cancel?

Your preferences have not been saved.

Grad Coach

How To Write The Methodology Chapter

The what, why & how explained simply (with examples).

By: Jenna Crossley (PhD) | Reviewed By: Dr. Eunice Rautenbach | September 2021 (Updated April 2023)

So, you’ve pinned down your research topic and undertaken a review of the literature – now it’s time to write up the methodology section of your dissertation, thesis or research paper . But what exactly is the methodology chapter all about – and how do you go about writing one? In this post, we’ll unpack the topic, step by step .

Overview: The Methodology Chapter

  • The purpose  of the methodology chapter
  • Why you need to craft this chapter (really) well
  • How to write and structure the chapter
  • Methodology chapter example
  • Essential takeaways

What (exactly) is the methodology chapter?

The methodology chapter is where you outline the philosophical underpinnings of your research and outline the specific methodological choices you’ve made. The point of the methodology chapter is to tell the reader exactly how you designed your study and, just as importantly, why you did it this way.

Importantly, this chapter should comprehensively describe and justify all the methodological choices you made in your study. For example, the approach you took to your research (i.e., qualitative, quantitative or mixed), who  you collected data from (i.e., your sampling strategy), how you collected your data and, of course, how you analysed it. If that sounds a little intimidating, don’t worry – we’ll explain all these methodological choices in this post .

Free Webinar: Research Methodology 101

Why is the methodology chapter important?

The methodology chapter plays two important roles in your dissertation or thesis:

Firstly, it demonstrates your understanding of research theory, which is what earns you marks. A flawed research design or methodology would mean flawed results. So, this chapter is vital as it allows you to show the marker that you know what you’re doing and that your results are credible .

Secondly, the methodology chapter is what helps to make your study replicable. In other words, it allows other researchers to undertake your study using the same methodological approach, and compare their findings to yours. This is very important within academic research, as each study builds on previous studies.

The methodology chapter is also important in that it allows you to identify and discuss any methodological issues or problems you encountered (i.e., research limitations ), and to explain how you mitigated the impacts of these. Every research project has its limitations , so it’s important to acknowledge these openly and highlight your study’s value despite its limitations . Doing so demonstrates your understanding of research design, which will earn you marks. We’ll discuss limitations in a bit more detail later in this post, so stay tuned!

Need a helping hand?

master thesis introduction chapter

How to write up the methodology chapter

First off, it’s worth noting that the exact structure and contents of the methodology chapter will vary depending on the field of research (e.g., humanities, chemistry or engineering) as well as the university . So, be sure to always check the guidelines provided by your institution for clarity and, if possible, review past dissertations from your university. Here we’re going to discuss a generic structure for a methodology chapter typically found in the sciences.

Before you start writing, it’s always a good idea to draw up a rough outline to guide your writing. Don’t just start writing without knowing what you’ll discuss where. If you do, you’ll likely end up with a disjointed, ill-flowing narrative . You’ll then waste a lot of time rewriting in an attempt to try to stitch all the pieces together. Do yourself a favour and start with the end in mind .

Section 1 – Introduction

As with all chapters in your dissertation or thesis, the methodology chapter should have a brief introduction. In this section, you should remind your readers what the focus of your study is, especially the research aims . As we’ve discussed many times on the blog, your methodology needs to align with your research aims, objectives and research questions. Therefore, it’s useful to frontload this component to remind the reader (and yourself!) what you’re trying to achieve.

In this section, you can also briefly mention how you’ll structure the chapter. This will help orient the reader and provide a bit of a roadmap so that they know what to expect. You don’t need a lot of detail here – just a brief outline will do.

The intro provides a roadmap to your methodology chapter

Section 2 – The Methodology

The next section of your chapter is where you’ll present the actual methodology. In this section, you need to detail and justify the key methodological choices you’ve made in a logical, intuitive fashion. Importantly, this is the heart of your methodology chapter, so you need to get specific – don’t hold back on the details here. This is not one of those “less is more” situations.

Let’s take a look at the most common components you’ll likely need to cover. 

Methodological Choice #1 – Research Philosophy

Research philosophy refers to the underlying beliefs (i.e., the worldview) regarding how data about a phenomenon should be gathered , analysed and used . The research philosophy will serve as the core of your study and underpin all of the other research design choices, so it’s critically important that you understand which philosophy you’ll adopt and why you made that choice. If you’re not clear on this, take the time to get clarity before you make any further methodological choices.

While several research philosophies exist, two commonly adopted ones are positivism and interpretivism . These two sit roughly on opposite sides of the research philosophy spectrum.

Positivism states that the researcher can observe reality objectively and that there is only one reality, which exists independently of the observer. As a consequence, it is quite commonly the underlying research philosophy in quantitative studies and is oftentimes the assumed philosophy in the physical sciences.

Contrasted with this, interpretivism , which is often the underlying research philosophy in qualitative studies, assumes that the researcher performs a role in observing the world around them and that reality is unique to each observer . In other words, reality is observed subjectively .

These are just two philosophies (there are many more), but they demonstrate significantly different approaches to research and have a significant impact on all the methodological choices. Therefore, it’s vital that you clearly outline and justify your research philosophy at the beginning of your methodology chapter, as it sets the scene for everything that follows.

The research philosophy is at the core of the methodology chapter

Methodological Choice #2 – Research Type

The next thing you would typically discuss in your methodology section is the research type. The starting point for this is to indicate whether the research you conducted is inductive or deductive .

Inductive research takes a bottom-up approach , where the researcher begins with specific observations or data and then draws general conclusions or theories from those observations. Therefore these studies tend to be exploratory in terms of approach.

Conversely , d eductive research takes a top-down approach , where the researcher starts with a theory or hypothesis and then tests it using specific observations or data. Therefore these studies tend to be confirmatory in approach.

Related to this, you’ll need to indicate whether your study adopts a qualitative, quantitative or mixed  approach. As we’ve mentioned, there’s a strong link between this choice and your research philosophy, so make sure that your choices are tightly aligned . When you write this section up, remember to clearly justify your choices, as they form the foundation of your study.

Methodological Choice #3 – Research Strategy

Next, you’ll need to discuss your research strategy (also referred to as a research design ). This methodological choice refers to the broader strategy in terms of how you’ll conduct your research, based on the aims of your study.

Several research strategies exist, including experimental , case studies , ethnography , grounded theory, action research , and phenomenology . Let’s take a look at two of these, experimental and ethnographic, to see how they contrast.

Experimental research makes use of the scientific method , where one group is the control group (in which no variables are manipulated ) and another is the experimental group (in which a specific variable is manipulated). This type of research is undertaken under strict conditions in a controlled, artificial environment (e.g., a laboratory). By having firm control over the environment, experimental research typically allows the researcher to establish causation between variables. Therefore, it can be a good choice if you have research aims that involve identifying causal relationships.

Ethnographic research , on the other hand, involves observing and capturing the experiences and perceptions of participants in their natural environment (for example, at home or in the office). In other words, in an uncontrolled environment.  Naturally, this means that this research strategy would be far less suitable if your research aims involve identifying causation, but it would be very valuable if you’re looking to explore and examine a group culture, for example.

As you can see, the right research strategy will depend largely on your research aims and research questions – in other words, what you’re trying to figure out. Therefore, as with every other methodological choice, it’s essential to justify why you chose the research strategy you did.

Methodological Choice #4 – Time Horizon

The next thing you’ll need to detail in your methodology chapter is the time horizon. There are two options here: cross-sectional and longitudinal . In other words, whether the data for your study were all collected at one point in time (cross-sectional) or at multiple points in time (longitudinal).

The choice you make here depends again on your research aims, objectives and research questions. If, for example, you aim to assess how a specific group of people’s perspectives regarding a topic change over time , you’d likely adopt a longitudinal time horizon.

Another important factor to consider is simply whether you have the time necessary to adopt a longitudinal approach (which could involve collecting data over multiple months or even years). Oftentimes, the time pressures of your degree program will force your hand into adopting a cross-sectional time horizon, so keep this in mind.

Methodological Choice #5 – Sampling Strategy

Next, you’ll need to discuss your sampling strategy . There are two main categories of sampling, probability and non-probability sampling.

Probability sampling involves a random (and therefore representative) selection of participants from a population, whereas non-probability sampling entails selecting participants in a non-random  (and therefore non-representative) manner. For example, selecting participants based on ease of access (this is called a convenience sample).

The right sampling approach depends largely on what you’re trying to achieve in your study. Specifically, whether you trying to develop findings that are generalisable to a population or not. Practicalities and resource constraints also play a large role here, as it can oftentimes be challenging to gain access to a truly random sample. In the video below, we explore some of the most common sampling strategies.

Methodological Choice #6 – Data Collection Method

Next up, you’ll need to explain how you’ll go about collecting the necessary data for your study. Your data collection method (or methods) will depend on the type of data that you plan to collect – in other words, qualitative or quantitative data.

Typically, quantitative research relies on surveys , data generated by lab equipment, analytics software or existing datasets. Qualitative research, on the other hand, often makes use of collection methods such as interviews , focus groups , participant observations, and ethnography.

So, as you can see, there is a tight link between this section and the design choices you outlined in earlier sections. Strong alignment between these sections, as well as your research aims and questions is therefore very important.

Methodological Choice #7 – Data Analysis Methods/Techniques

The final major methodological choice that you need to address is that of analysis techniques . In other words, how you’ll go about analysing your date once you’ve collected it. Here it’s important to be very specific about your analysis methods and/or techniques – don’t leave any room for interpretation. Also, as with all choices in this chapter, you need to justify each choice you make.

What exactly you discuss here will depend largely on the type of study you’re conducting (i.e., qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods). For qualitative studies, common analysis methods include content analysis , thematic analysis and discourse analysis . In the video below, we explain each of these in plain language.

For quantitative studies, you’ll almost always make use of descriptive statistics , and in many cases, you’ll also use inferential statistical techniques (e.g., correlation and regression analysis). In the video below, we unpack some of the core concepts involved in descriptive and inferential statistics.

In this section of your methodology chapter, it’s also important to discuss how you prepared your data for analysis, and what software you used (if any). For example, quantitative data will often require some initial preparation such as removing duplicates or incomplete responses . Similarly, qualitative data will often require transcription and perhaps even translation. As always, remember to state both what you did and why you did it.

Section 3 – The Methodological Limitations

With the key methodological choices outlined and justified, the next step is to discuss the limitations of your design. No research methodology is perfect – there will always be trade-offs between the “ideal” methodology and what’s practical and viable, given your constraints. Therefore, this section of your methodology chapter is where you’ll discuss the trade-offs you had to make, and why these were justified given the context.

Methodological limitations can vary greatly from study to study, ranging from common issues such as time and budget constraints to issues of sample or selection bias . For example, you may find that you didn’t manage to draw in enough respondents to achieve the desired sample size (and therefore, statistically significant results), or your sample may be skewed heavily towards a certain demographic, thereby negatively impacting representativeness .

In this section, it’s important to be critical of the shortcomings of your study. There’s no use trying to hide them (your marker will be aware of them regardless). By being critical, you’ll demonstrate to your marker that you have a strong understanding of research theory, so don’t be shy here. At the same time, don’t beat your study to death . State the limitations, why these were justified, how you mitigated their impacts to the best degree possible, and how your study still provides value despite these limitations .

Section 4 – Concluding Summary

Finally, it’s time to wrap up the methodology chapter with a brief concluding summary. In this section, you’ll want to concisely summarise what you’ve presented in the chapter. Here, it can be a good idea to use a figure to summarise the key decisions, especially if your university recommends using a specific model (for example, Saunders’ Research Onion ).

Importantly, this section needs to be brief – a paragraph or two maximum (it’s a summary, after all). Also, make sure that when you write up your concluding summary, you include only what you’ve already discussed in your chapter; don’t add any new information.

Keep it simple

Methodology Chapter Example

In the video below, we walk you through an example of a high-quality research methodology chapter from a dissertation. We also unpack our free methodology chapter template so that you can see how best to structure your chapter.

Wrapping Up

And there you have it – the methodology chapter in a nutshell. As we’ve mentioned, the exact contents and structure of this chapter can vary between universities , so be sure to check in with your institution before you start writing. If possible, try to find dissertations or theses from former students of your specific degree program – this will give you a strong indication of the expectations and norms when it comes to the methodology chapter (and all the other chapters!).

Also, remember the golden rule of the methodology chapter – justify every choice ! Make sure that you clearly explain the “why” for every “what”, and reference credible methodology textbooks or academic sources to back up your justifications.

If you need a helping hand with your research methodology (or any other component of your research), be sure to check out our private coaching service , where we hold your hand through every step of the research journey. Until next time, good luck!

master thesis introduction chapter

Psst… there’s more (for free)

This post is part of our dissertation mini-course, which covers everything you need to get started with your dissertation, thesis or research project. 

You Might Also Like:

Quantitative results chapter in a dissertation

50 Comments

DAUDI JACKSON GYUNDA

highly appreciated.

florin

This was very helpful!

Nophie

This was helpful

mengistu

Thanks ,it is a very useful idea.

Thanks ,it is very useful idea.

Lucia

Thank you so much, this information is very useful.

Shemeka Hodge-Joyce

Thank you very much. I must say the information presented was succinct, coherent and invaluable. It is well put together and easy to comprehend. I have a great guide to create the research methodology for my dissertation.

james edwin thomson

Highly clear and useful.

Amir

I understand a bit on the explanation above. I want to have some coach but I’m still student and don’t have any budget to hire one. A lot of question I want to ask.

Henrick

Thank you so much. This concluded my day plan. Thank you so much.

Najat

Thanks it was helpful

Karen

Great information. It would be great though if you could show us practical examples.

Patrick O Matthew

Thanks so much for this information. God bless and be with you

Atugonza Zahara

Thank you so so much. Indeed it was helpful

Joy O.

This is EXCELLENT!

I was totally confused by other explanations. Thank you so much!.

keinemukama surprise

justdoing my research now , thanks for the guidance.

Yucong Huang

Thank uuuu! These contents are really valued for me!

Thokozani kanyemba

This is powerful …I really like it

Hend Zahran

Highly useful and clear, thank you so much.

Harry Kaliza

Highly appreciated. Good guide

Fateme Esfahani

That was helpful. Thanks

David Tshigomana

This is very useful.Thank you

Kaunda

Very helpful information. Thank you

Peter

This is exactly what I was looking for. The explanation is so detailed and easy to comprehend. Well done and thank you.

Shazia Malik

Great job. You just summarised everything in the easiest and most comprehensible way possible. Thanks a lot.

Rosenda R. Gabriente

Thank you very much for the ideas you have given this will really help me a lot. Thank you and God Bless.

Eman

Such great effort …….very grateful thank you

Shaji Viswanathan

Please accept my sincere gratitude. I have to say that the information that was delivered was congruent, concise, and quite helpful. It is clear and straightforward, making it simple to understand. I am in possession of an excellent manual that will assist me in developing the research methods for my dissertation.

lalarie

Thank you for your great explanation. It really helped me construct my methodology paper.

Daniel sitieney

thank you for simplifieng the methodoly, It was realy helpful

Kayode

Very helpful!

Nathan

Thank you for your great explanation.

Emily Kamende

The explanation I have been looking for. So clear Thank you

Abraham Mafuta

Thank you very much .this was more enlightening.

Jordan

helped me create the in depth and thorough methodology for my dissertation

Nelson D Menduabor

Thank you for the great explaination.please construct one methodology for me

I appreciate you for the explanation of methodology. Please construct one methodology on the topic: The effects influencing students dropout among schools for my thesis

This helped me complete my methods section of my dissertation with ease. I have managed to write a thorough and concise methodology!

ASHA KIUNGA

its so good in deed

leslie chihope

wow …what an easy to follow presentation. very invaluable content shared. utmost important.

Ahmed khedr

Peace be upon you, I am Dr. Ahmed Khedr, a former part-time professor at Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt. I am currently teaching research methods, and I have been dealing with your esteemed site for several years, and I found that despite my long experience with research methods sites, it is one of the smoothest sites for evaluating the material for students, For this reason, I relied on it a lot in teaching and translated most of what was written into Arabic and published it on my own page on Facebook. Thank you all… Everything I posted on my page is provided with the names of the writers of Grad coach, the title of the article, and the site. My best regards.

Daniel Edwards

A remarkably simple and useful guide, thank you kindly.

Magnus Mahenge

I real appriciate your short and remarkable chapter summary

Olalekan Adisa

Bravo! Very helpful guide.

Arthur Margraf

Only true experts could provide such helpful, fantastic, and inspiring knowledge about Methodology. Thank you very much! God be with you and us all!

Aruni Nilangi

highly appreciate your effort.

White Label Blog Content

This is a very well thought out post. Very informative and a great read.

FELEKE FACHA

THANKS SO MUCH FOR SHARING YOUR NICE IDEA

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Print Friendly
  • About LiveInnovation.org
  • Prof. Dr. Francisco Tigre Moura
  • Publications
  • Live AM: Artist Monitor
  • Live FM: Fan Monitor
  • Media/Events
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Marketing Research
  • Statistics Support
  • Thesis Writing

LiveInnovation.org

  • Research Support

How to Write an INTRODUCTION Chapter (of a Thesis)

So it seems like you’ve read my previous article on how to develop a fantastic marketing or management thesis idea , right?

That is great. But perhaps now you have a clear idea of what to do for your research project but you don’t know exactly how to start your bachelor or masters thesis?

No worries! We’ve got your back. Here are some (hopefully) useful tips to do a great job and impress your supervisor and reviewers!

First of all: There is NO specific correct way to structure the Introduction chapter. But I suggest you cover the following structure:

***********************************************************

  • Introduction

1.1 Personal Motivation

1.2 Research Aims and Objectives

       1.2.1 Aim

1.2.2 Objectives

1.3 Structure of the Thesis

Let’s discuss each topic in detail so that you don’t miss anything and can look impressively smart!

Imagine that your grandma is going to read your thesis and it is entitled “Applying Machine to Machine Interaction to Improve Sustainability Practices in Music Festivals”.

Would she know what “Machine to Machine Interaction” is? (Maybe she does and even more than us two put together!). But let’s assume she has no clue!

Would she know which sustainability practices are applied in music festivals? (Well, maybe she went to Woodstock in 1969, had an affair with Jimmy Hendrix and helped them reduce water consumption!). But let’s assume she has no clue of what it is!

This is exactly the point of an introduction! The reader (whoever he/she may be!) has to be able to read your introduction and have an OVERALL idea and be FAMILIARIZED with the CONTEXT of your study.

And how do you achieve it? SIMPLE. Do the following:

  • What is it? When did it start?
  • Which are they? What are examples of practices applied to music festivals?
  • What is the trend within the industry sector/product type/service type you are discussing? In the last decade, has it increased? Decreased? How large is the global/regional market size? What are sales volumes of key players?
  • Use RELIABLE sources for your data: renowned institutions and organizations, research groups, scientific publications.
  • Make sure to REFERENCE all your data.

Video Support: Introduction Chapter 

In case you are enjoying the article, do not forget to watch the video with further support on how to write the introduction chapter of your thesis.

Here is the section of the thesis where you describe your motivation for conducting a study on this topic.

In other words: Explain why you are writing about “Applying Machine to Machine Interaction to Improve Sustainability Practices in Music Festivals” and not about any other random topic such as: “If there is life on other planets, aliens would also be fans of The Beatles”.

To explain your motivation and why you chose this topic you should ideally be very personal and even write this section in the first person ( other academics might disagree with me on this, but it’s ok ).

And keep this section SHORT. Two GOOD paragraphs should be enough.

Here it is VERY SIMPLE. You have read the recommendations on LiveInnovation.org on “ How to Develop a Research Project (or Thesis) Idea ”, right? NO? (Oh man, it’s not easy being your supervisor. Honestly!). So go check the site for it!

If you have, (Good on you, I’m proud!), then simply describe your aim in a sub-section 1.2.1 and 1.2.2 your objectives.

The objectives in 1.2.2 can even be stated in bullet points.

And here it is absolutely easy!

Even if you have a headache, you team has lost, you ran out of Oreo Ice cream Sandwich in the fridge and  your 6 year old neighbor is learning to play the violin, you can still write this section.

It will only take you one or two paragraphs to describe in GENERAL terms what will be discussed in the following chapters.

ONE SUGGESTION: Leave this for last and only write it once you have finished the entire thesis.

So basically you should have done the following in this chapter:

  • First you have familiarized your reader with the context of your study, regardless of who is reading (Your former hippie grandma or Michael Jordan).
  • You have familiarized the reader with YOU, by explaining WHY you are writing about this topic.
  • You have explained what the thesis will be about.
  • Finally you have anticipated the reader with what he/she/it will face on the coming chapters until the end of the thesis.

So now you are DONE with Chapter one and can focus on the rest of the thesis!

(In case you want to thank me later: I truly enjoy beer, Port wine and Whiskey).

Download the Recommendations

Did you like this article? Would like to have these recommendations with you while studying?

GREAT! Simply download the file here with all details:  LiveInnovation.org - Introduction Chapter of a Thesis.pdf

In case you would like to have more research suggestions, check our research resources section .

master thesis introduction chapter

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

master thesis introduction chapter

SOUNDS LIKE A THESIS is now available on Spotify!

master thesis introduction chapter

Download Our e-Book: “Sounds Like A Thesis”

master thesis introduction chapter

SPSS Tutorial Series on YouTube: Learn Quickly and Easily

Privacy overview.

This is an necessary category.

This is an non-necessary category.

Hoortash Institute

Hoortash Institute

Consultation writing, accepting and publishing articles

How to Write Chapter One; the Introduction of Thesis

In “ Chapters of a Ph.D. and master’s thesis ” we discussed every five chapters of a thesis briefly. Now we are going to talk about chapter one deeper.

Chapter one of a thesis acts as a funnel. It begins with a broad subject related to the title of thesis, then narrows down to the variables and the questions/problems which are going to be solved in the research.

Generally, in introduction you need to explain what the reader is going to read about.

The introduction chapter has some subtitles which are:

  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Statement of the Problem
  • 3 The Significance of the Study
  • 4 Purpose of the Study
  • 5 Research Questions
  • 6 Research Hypothesis
  • 7 Definition of the Keywords
  • 8 Limitations and Delimitations

You should adhere to the format of numbering subtitles.

Now take a look at the content of each section:

Introduction

In this section, introduce the subject you have studied. Start with the broad topic and limit it to the title of the thesis. By doing so, you establish your research territory.

Then provide some quotes or paraphrase other researches that emphasis on importance of the title. Show that according to other researches and papers there was a gap and you tried to fill that gap.

Statement of the Problem

Statement of the problem (SOP) has fiver smaller parts which are:

  • Topic: in this paragraph you need to state the problem, from theoretical and practical points of view.
  • Gap: state that this specific problem was not solved in previous researches.
  • The evidence: write one or two paragraphs on some parts of other papers that the researcher indicates that the problem exists.  
  • Deficiencies: demonstrate that how you solved the problem and how the gap was filled.
  • Audience: whom your study is precious to, and where it would be useful.

As you can see, SOP would be five to six paragraphs, and each paragraph has a clear aim.

Unlike the introduction section, you do not need to provide resources for every single statement in SOP, except for evidence section.

Note: remember that in the introduction you talked about the gap, too. There is a difference between the two gaps in SOP and in the introduction. The gap in the introduction is a broader gap, while in SOP you need to clarify it in details.

Significance of the Study

In this part, you should write in details. Prove that your study is significant for the major, other researches, and some other specific people related to the field of study (name them).

To do so, you may ask yourself these questions that how and why this study would be important.

Also usually the researchers state some gaps that they have found in the field during their research, in chapter five (conclusion) of papers and theses. You can use them as a proof of the significance of your study.

Purpose of the Study

State that by this research what you are looking for, and what you expect to reveal.

Research Questions

After a brief introduction, write down some questions which you aim to answer during your research.

In fact, the research questions are the same as the purpose of the study in the form of questions.

Research Hypothesis

In this section, answer to the research questions which are stated in the previous part.

For example, if one of the questions is “Is there any statistically significant relationship between TCK and IS of Iranian EFL learners?” then the hypothesis would be “There is no statistically significant relationship between TCK of Iranian EFL learners and their ICS.”

Only use null hypotheses.

Definition of the Keywords

Keywords are the variables of the thesis. Define them theoretically and operationally.

In order to write a theoretical definition, you need to scan related papers and find the definition of the keywords as they defined. Write several theoretical definitions quoted by several researchers.

After theoretical definition, open a new paragraph and state how the keywords are defined in your research. It would be called “empirical definition”.

Limitation and Delimitation

Every researcher face some limitation during the research process.

Limitation could be the limit number of samples, being a sample out of reach, and so on.

Limitation is out of researcher’s control, while delimitation is chosen by the researcher . For example, a researcher chooses to distribute the questionnaire among women, and not men.

Note that the explained format works in writing chapter 1 of proposals, too. The only difference is in the number of pages. Proposals have less number of pages in comparison to theses .

You Might Also Like

literature review

3 thoughts on “ How to Write Chapter One; the Introduction of Thesis ”

Thank you, bookwormlab for opening my eyes and telling me I should not limit my creative thought to just one essay, haha Since I started submitting my papers for editing and using the resulting texts as samples for my next assignments Amazing!

I got brief information about the aim of the theies.

Thank you so much

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

IMAGES

  1. How to emphasize the thesis introduction chapter from the rest of the

    master thesis introduction chapter

  2. Master thesis structure

    master thesis introduction chapter

  3. Thesis Chapter 1 Introduction

    master thesis introduction chapter

  4. Chapter 2 Thesis Introduction Sample

    master thesis introduction chapter

  5. 🏷️ Master thesis introduction sample. Free Thesis Introduction Chapter

    master thesis introduction chapter

  6. Thesis Chapter 1 Introduction

    master thesis introduction chapter

VIDEO

  1. The Thesis

  2. Thesis Introduction Video: The Farmstead

  3. Master's Thesis

  4. Master's Thesis

  5. Module 06 Writing Thesis Introduction

  6. How to write the introduction chapter of a dissertation

COMMENTS

  1. How to write a fantastic thesis introduction (+15 examples)

    The thesis introduction, usually chapter 1, is one of the most important chapters of a thesis. It sets the scene. It previews key arguments and findings. And it helps the reader to understand the structure of the thesis. In short, a lot is riding on this first chapter. With the following tips, you can write a powerful thesis introduction.

  2. How To Write A Dissertation Introduction Chapter

    Craft an enticing and engaging opening section. Provide a background and context to the study. Clearly define the research problem. State your research aims, objectives and questions. Explain the significance of your study. Identify the limitations of your research. Outline the structure of your dissertation or thesis.

  3. How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Introduction

    Overview of the structure. To help guide your reader, end your introduction with an outline of the structure of the thesis or dissertation to follow. Share a brief summary of each chapter, clearly showing how each contributes to your central aims. However, be careful to keep this overview concise: 1-2 sentences should be enough.

  4. How to write the introductory chapter of a masters thesis?

    Answer: Generally, the chapter titles in a thesis are formatted as follows: Chapter X: Name of the chapter. You can choose to name the first chapter "Introduction" or something more imaginative if you feel like, depending on what is the norm in your field. However, if you choose to use more creative names, make sure they are not very informal.

  5. Dissertation & Thesis Outline

    A thesis or dissertation outline helps you to organize your ideas succinctly, and can provide you with a roadmap for your research. ... IS-AV construction Chapter 1 presents an introduction to the problem and Chapter 2 discusses the relevant literature. Example 3: The "I" construction ... with master's degrees in political science and ...

  6. How to write an introduction chapter for a thesis

    Give a forthcoming chapter overview. The final part of the introduction is an overview of the rest of the chapters in the thesis. The other sections can go in any order, providing it is a logical sequence. Learn from others. Look at other theses for example from White Rose etheses or your university library's website. The majority of journal ...

  7. PDF A Complete Dissertation

    1. Introduction 2. Literature review 3. Methodology 4. Findings 5. Analysis and synthesis 6. Conclusions and recommendations Chapter 1: Introduction This chapter makes a case for the signifi-cance of the problem, contextualizes the study, and provides an introduction to its basic components. It should be informative and able to stand alone as a ...

  8. Free Download: Thesis Introduction Template (Word Doc + PDF)

    This template covers all the core components required in the introduction chapter/section of a typical dissertation or thesis, including: The opening section. Background of the research topic. Statement of the problem. Rationale (including the research aims, objectives, and questions) Scope of the study. Significance of the study.

  9. How To Write A Dissertation Introduction Or Thesis Introduction Chapter

    Learn how to craft a top-notch dissertation introduction or thesis introduction in 7 easy steps. We explain how to develop a high-quality introduction chapte...

  10. How to Write a Thesis Introduction

    Stages in a thesis introduction. state the general topic and give some background. provide a review of the literature related to the topic. define the terms and scope of the topic. outline the current situation. evaluate the current situation (advantages/ disadvantages) and identify the gap. identify the importance of the proposed research.

  11. How to write a good thesis introduction

    2. Hook the reader and grab their attention. 3. Provide relevant background. 4. Give the reader a sense of what the paper is about. 5. Preview key points and lead into your thesis statement. Frequently Asked Questions about writing a good thesis introduction.

  12. How to write a thesis introduction chapter

    Knowing how to write a thesis introduction chapter well is your key to impressing your examiner from the get-go and ensuring they're super keen to read the rest of your masters or PhD thesis. So, what exactly should your introduction entail? Let's delve into the key components. To kick things off, you need to grab your reader's attention.

  13. How To Write A Thesis Introduction Chapter

    Limitations Of The Study. - Outlines study boundaries. - Addresses constraints. - Manages reader expectations. - Establishes trust with transparency. Structural Outline Of Thesis. - Acts as a blueprint for the thesis. - Outlines each chapter succinctly. - Ensures logical progression of research work.

  14. PDF Overview of the Master's Degree and Thesis

    Each chapter has a specific focus and objective. The titles of the five chapters are: (1) Introduction, (2) Review of the Literature, (3) Methods, (4) Results, and (5) Discussion. The structure of the five chapters is the same whether you are conducting a qualitative or quantitative study.

  15. Chapter introductions

    Chapter introductions perform a similar orientation function in that they introduce the reader to the foci, aims, procedure and argument of each specific chapter, and provide any other necessary reader-information for that chapter. ANU Library Academic Skills. +61 2 6125 2972. Send email. Your overall thesis objectives or questions can be ...

  16. How to Write a Thesis or Dissertation Introduction

    Overview of the structure. To help guide your reader, end your introduction with an outline of the structure of the thesis or dissertation to follow. Share a brief summary of each chapter, clearly showing how each contributes to your central aims. However, be careful to keep this overview concise: 1-2 sentences should be enough.

  17. Learn How to Write a Thesis Introduction- An Easy Guide

    Therefore, a PhD thesis paper introduction would be 8000 - 10000 words. However, a Master's thesis would be 1500 - 2000 words long. Although the thesis introduction length can be increased if the writer includes images, diagrams, and descriptions. ... A thesis introduction chapter structure contains the following sections: Introduction. A ...

  18. How To Write The Methodology Chapter

    Section 1 - Introduction. As with all chapters in your dissertation or thesis, the methodology chapter should have a brief introduction. In this section, you should remind your readers what the focus of your study is, especially the research aims. As we've discussed many times on the blog, your methodology needs to align with your research ...

  19. How to Write an INTRODUCTION Chapter (of a Thesis)

    SIMPLE. Do the following: Introduce and explain BASIC concepts of your thesis to your reader for the first time in a simple way (leave the detailed descriptions for your Theoretical background/Literature Review). In the example above, you would explain: "Machine to Machine Interaction". For example:

  20. HOW TO WRITE YOUR MASTER THESIS: THE EASY HANDBOOK

    HOW TO WRITE YOUR Phd THESIS: THE EASY HANDBOOK. January 2023. Zouhour El Abiad. Hani El-Chaarani. Writing a PhD's thesis is a challenging mission in higher education. This work requires in ...

  21. PDF How to write a good master thesis

    To put your results into context and reach conclusions. Formulate conclusions and interpret them in the light of known information. Generalize conclusions into what is it we learned. Make sure that what you have learned is indeed an answer to the question posed in the introduction. Thoughts on applied relevance/the future.

  22. How to structure the Introduction of my Master's thesis?

    At the moment, it consists of the following sections: Objective [where I briefly introduce the aim of my thesis] Area of Research [where my thesis collocates in a more general pipeline] Conclusion [where I very briefly summarize the content of each chapter]. It's very short (I'm trying to keep the complete thesis below ~50 pages), but there is ...

  23. How to Write Chapter One; the Introduction of Thesis

    In "Chapters of a Ph.D. and master's thesis" we discussed every five chapters of a thesis briefly. Now we are going to talk about chapter one deeper. Chapter one of a thesis acts as a funnel. It begins with a broad subject related to the title of thesis, then narrows down to the variables and the questions/problems which are going to be solved in the research.