President John F. Kennedy delivers his Inaugural Address during ceremonies at the Capitol, 20 January 1961.

Inspire the next generation of leaders with President Kennedy's powerful legacy!

Analyzing the rhetoric of jfk's inaugural address, about this resource.

Download this lesson plan , including handouts, in pdf format.

Topics: Persuasive Writing and Speaking; Campaign, Election and Inauguration; Cold War

Grade Level: 9-12

Subject Areas: English Language Arts; US History

Time Required: 1-2 hours

Goals/Rationale

An inaugural address is a speech for a very specific event—being sworn into the office of the presidency.  The speeches of modern presidents share some commonalities in referencing American history, the importance of the occasion, and hope for the future. Each president, however, has faced the particular challenges of his time and put his own distinctive rhetorical stamp on the address.

In the course of writing this address, John F. Kennedy and Theodore Sorensen, his advisor and main speechwriter, asked for and received suggestions from advisors and colleagues. ( See the telegram from Ted Sorensen dated December 23, 1960 here .) In his delivered speech, Kennedy included several sections of text provided by both John Kenneth Galbraith, an economics professor at Harvard University and Adlai Stevenson, former governor of Illinois and Democratic presidential candidate in 1952 and 1956.

In this lesson plan, students consider the rhetorical devices in the address JFK delivered on January 20, 1961. They then analyze the suggestions made by Galbraith and Stevenson and compare them to the delivered version of the speech. Students then evaluate the impact of the changes on the resonance of the speech.

Essential Question:  How can the use of rhetorical devices enhance a speech?

Students will:

  • identify rhetorical terms and methods.
  • examine the rhetorical devices of JFK’s Inaugural Address .
  • analyze the effects of the rhetorical devices on the delivered speech.

Preparation

Historical Background and Context

On January 20, 1961, a clerk of the US Supreme Court held the large Fitzgerald family Bible as John F. Kennedy took the oath of office to become the nation’s 35th president.  Against a backdrop of deep snow and sunshine, more than twenty thousand people huddled in 20-degree temperatures on the east front of the Capitol to witness the event. Kennedy, having removed his topcoat and projecting both youth and vigor, delivered what has become a landmark inaugural address.

His audience reached far beyond those gathered before him to people around the world. In preparing for this moment, he sought both to inspire the nation and to send a message abroad signaling the challenges of the Cold War and his hope for peace in the nuclear age. He also wanted to be brief. As he’d remarked to his close advisor, Ted Sorensen, “I don’t want people to think I’m a windbag.”

He assigned Sorensen the task of studying other inaugural speeches and Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address to glean the secrets of successful addresses. The finely-crafted delivered speech had been revised and reworked numerous times by Kennedy and Sorensen until the President-elect was satisfied. Though not the shortest of inaugural addresses, Kennedy’s was shorter than most at 1,355 words in length and, like Lincoln’s famous speech, was comprised of short phrases and words. In addition to message, word choice and length, he recognized that captivating his audience required a powerful delivery. On the day before and on the morning of Inauguration Day, he kept a copy handy to take advantage of any spare moment to review it, even at the breakfast table.

What many consider to be the most memorable and enduring section of the speech came towards the end when Kennedy called on all Americans to commit themselves to service and sacrifice: “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country. He then continued by addressing his international audience: “My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.”

Having won the election by one of the smallest popular vote margins in history, Kennedy had known the great importance of this speech. People who witnessed the speech or heard it broadcast over television and radio lauded the new President. Even elementary school children wrote to him with their reactions to his ideas. Following his inaugural address, nearly seventy-five percent of Americans expressed approval of President Kennedy.

(all included in the  downloadable pdf )

  • Handout:  Poetry and Power:   John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address
  • Reading copy of JFK’s Inaugural Address
  • Handout:  Rhetorical Terms and Techniques of Persuasion
  • Chart:  Excerpts from Inaugural Suggestions and Delivered Speech
  • Have students read  Poetry and Power: John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address  to provide them with background information about the speech.
  • Have students read through the text of  JFK’s inaugural address  as they listen to his speech.
  • Provide students with the  Rhetorical Terms   and Techniques of Persuasion  handout and review the terminology of rhetorical methods.
  • Have students mark up the speech, noting where the specific rhetorical methods occur.
  • “[S]hort speeches, short clauses and short words, wherever possible.” (Sorensen,  Kennedy , 60).
  • “The test of a text was not how it appeared to the eye but how it sounded to the ear” (Sorensen,  Kennedy , 61).
  • “He liked to be exact. But if the situation required a certain vagueness, he would deliberately choose a word of varying interpretations rather than bury his imprecision in ponderous prose.” (Sorensen,  Kennedy , 61).
  • “The intellectual level of his speeches showed erudition but not arrogance.” (Sorensen,  Kennedy , 62).
  • Explain that for many of his key speeches, Kennedy turned to several advisors for their suggestions on content.
  • Provide students with the chart  Excerpts from Inaugural Suggestions and Delivered Speech  that shows excerpts of suggestions for the speech provided by Adlai Stevenson and John Kenneth Galbraith that were included in the delivered speech—and the revisions made to these excerpts for the delivered speech.
  • Discuss with the class the changes made by Sorensen and Kennedy to the original suggested excerpts from Galbraith and Stevenson.
  • Have students write a 2-3 page paper, responding to the question:  “In what ways did the additional rhetorical devices strengthen or weaken the passages in the earlier suggestions? Provide specific examples. What other improvements do you note between the suggestions provided by Galbraith and Stevenson and the delivered version of the speech? How might Kennedy’s preferences in speechwriting have influenced the changes from the suggested language to the delivered version of the speech? 
  • Have students choose 2-3 passages from the speech and provide their own text showing how they might improve upon the delivered passages, keeping in mind the rhetorical techniques they have studied. When they are done, have the class read through the rewritten speech in a “jigsaw,” with students providing their version of the passages in place of Kennedy’s text.

Connections to Curriculum (Standards)

National History Standards -  US History, Era 9: Postwar United States (1945 to early 1970s)

  • Standard 3: Domestic policies after World War II

Common Core State Standards

  • ELA College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language
  • ELA – Reading Informational Texts, Writing, Speaking and Listening, Language, and Literacy in History/Social Studies for grades 9-10 and 11-12

National Council of Teachers of English : Standards 1, 3, 4, 5, 6

Massachusetts History and Social Science Framework

  • USII.T3  - Defending democracy: responses to fascism and communism

Massachusetts English Language Arts Framework

  • Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language

Sorensen, Theodore C.  Kennedy.  New York:   Harper & Row, Publishers, 1965.

Tofel, Richard J.  Sounding the Trumpet: The Making of John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address . Chicago: Ivan R. Dee Publisher, 2005.

Home / Essay Samples / Government / Presidents of The United States / John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address: an Analysis

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History , Government , Sociology

History of The United States , Presidents of The United States , Sociology of Media and Communication

American History , John F. Kennedy , Rhetorical Strategies

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Home — Essay Samples — Government & Politics — John F. Kennedy — A Literary Analysis of an Inaugural Speech by John F. Kennedy

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A Literary Analysis of an Inaugural Speech by John F. Kennedy

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john f kennedy rhetorical analysis essay

John F. Kennedy Civil Rights Speech Rhetorical Analysis

John F. Kennedy’s ” Civil rights speech” created many controversies because of the way that John F. Kennedy approaches racial issues in America. John F. Kennedy was elected as president after the assassination of John F. Kennedy and John Fitzgerald Kennedy gave his first State of The Union Address at regular session of the United States 87th United States Congress on January 30, 1961.

As you read John F. Kennedy’s “Civil Rights Address,” it is important to remember that in the 1960s, many places across America enforced strict segregation policies. John F. Kennedy was speaking in an era when black Americans were not allowed to eat at the same restaurants as whites, were not allowed to live in the same neighborhoods as whites, and most importantly they were not allowed equal rights under the law. John F. Kennedy wanted all of that to change, and he made his “Civil Rights Address” with that goal in mind.

John F. Kennedy begins his “Civil Rights Address” by saying how far society has come since slaves first arrived on African shores hundreds of years ago (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy is making it clear that he believes society, as whole, has changed for the better regarding race issues since the beginning of African slavery. John F. Kennedy then says how great strides have been made for racial equality in recent years (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy explains how even though change still needs to be made, there is positive movement towards equality across America and throughout the world (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy begins his “Civil Rights Address” by explaining that American culture has changed dramatically over the past two hundred or so years, and now focuses on equal rights rather than discrimination against minorities (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy feels it necessary to point out these changes so his audience remembers where America stands on the issue of civil rights. John F Kennedy continues his “Civil Rights Address” by saying how segregation is a national problem and requires a united effort from all citizens to fix it, as America cannot afford the social problems that stem from racism (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy explains that if America wants to move forward as a nation, segregation has to end whether people want it to or not (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy understands that ending segregation may result in some backlash among those who benefit from it, but John F. Kennedy does not care about them; John F. Kennedy only cares about making sure minorities are treated equally under the law going forward (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy says how the laws which govern the country were not created with discrimination in mind, and that they need to be applied equally to everyone (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy talks about how many of the laws in America are old and do not take into account modern day issues like segregation, so John F. Kennedy says these laws require some reworking so they can better serve all Americans (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy explains how opposing segregation is not about taking rights away from one group but instead giving additional rights to another group which was previously denied them (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy continues his “Civil Rights Address” by saying how past generations fought for equality under the law, while current generations must continue their fight for full equality on all fronts (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy wants future generations to remember that John F. Kennedy and other civil rights proponents are not trying to take anything away from them, but instead John F. Kennedy is trying add equality which was previously lacking in society (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy says how the fight for equality is a long process and will require many hours of hard work and determination, but John F. Kennedy believes it is worth fighting for (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy tells his audience they must treat all Americans equally under the law in order to move forward as a nation (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy continues his “Civil Rights Address” by explaining that racism only creates an environment where violence thrives, and that if America can end segregation then it can end such violence (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy says how racism causes people to lash out and hurt others just because of the color of their skin, and John F. Kennedy believes if segregation ends then so too will this type of violence (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy wants to make it clear that America has made its fair share of mistakes in regard to race relations, but that John F. Kennedy is confident everyone can work together in order to fix things for the better going forward (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy continues his “Civil Rights Address” by saying how he understands not all whites are racist, but John F. Kennedy does believe racists must be willing to change their ways if progress is ever going to be made (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy implores his audience to help end segregation in order to unite the country under one banner of freedom instead of continuing John F. Kennedy’s nation’s long history of division over race relations (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy finishes his “Civil Rights Address” by saying how change is never easy, but it is better than the alternative which is continued strife between races in America (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy wants everyone to remember that although African Americans have suffered a lot in the past, John F. Kennedy trusts they will be able to handle whatever obstacles are presented to them because John F. Kennedy knows just how strong they are as people (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy believes in them, and John F. Kennedy wants to give the African American community the peace of mind knowing they have a friend in John F. Kennedy going forward (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy knows that without a doubt things are going to get better from here on out because John F. Kennedy has faith in humanity regardless of race or creed, but John F. Kennedy also knows it will require effort from everyone if change is ever going to come about for all Americans regardless of how things used to be done in the past (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedys “Civil Rights Address” is meant for both blacks and whites alike; he implores his audience to help end segregation while also explaining why integration is necessary for society to continue to exist in the future (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy wants his audience to understand why he is pushing for change, and John F. Kennedy wants them to help make this change come about (Kennedy).

John F. Kennedy appeals to Americans on both sides of the issue because John F. Kennedy understands that although there are racists out there, John F. Kennedy also knows they can be taught to act differently by their peers who do not share these same extremist views (Kennedy).

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By Mike Hale

In the spirit of “Who actually watches the game?,” here is our ranking of Sunday night’s Super Bowl commercials, from best to worst.

Ground rules: Only ads shown on the national CBS broadcast during the game were eligible. Not included are some non-commercial (religious, political, social advocacy) spots and most movie trailers and promos for television and streaming broadcasts.

The Best of the Bunch

These are the ones we’ll remember for at least a day or two.

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Mountain Dew

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Squarespace

Aliens (a theme in this year’s ads) come to earth and can’t get our attention until they figure out how to get on the internet. It is handsomely directed by Martin Scorsese (working with the “Barbie” cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto), though it’s not at all clear what’s being advertised.

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Vince Vaughn explains that Tom Brady, and only Tom Brady, is not allowed to use the sports betting service because he has already won too much. Vaughn-to-Brady is a winning combination.

The Perfectly Fine

These get an A for effort and a B- for execution.

The “Abbott Elementary” star Quinta Brunson tells us (twice) to do our taxes. Brunson is so darn likable that it seems like a good idea.

NYX Cosmetics

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Apartments.com

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STōK Cold Brew

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Inoffensive but Forgettable

They tried. Nobody got hurt.

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Candies joyfully dance before being popped into the mouth of the influencer Addison Rae. Nothing much to it, but watching a big gummy pirouette to “Flashdance … What a Feeling” is just a little bit mesmerizing.

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Young female athletes take pratfalls across a variety of sports in what turns out to be a public service announcement for body positivity. Engaging but not quite coherent.

Had some talent involved but the result sailed wide right.

Booking.com

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The fictitious outing of Michael Cera as the mastermind behind the similarly spelled cosmetics line continues in a sendup of dreamy, narcissistic designer-brand commercials. Could have used an exfoliator.

‘N.F.L. Sunday Ticket’

Evoking Carroll Ballard’s wonderful film “Fly Away Home,” a solo pilot follows uniformed Eagles and Seahawks who are migrating away from the football season. Just barely achieves flight.

Michelob Ultra

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Bass Pro Shops

Photogenic middle Americans pilot Bass Tracker fishing boats around picturesque lakes. Straightforward, as if made for local late-night.

Mighty Patch

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Chris Pratt puts on a walrus mustache and goes viral as the Pringles guy. Cute but does not answer the question, “Chris Pratt?”

Kate McKinnon and a monosyllabic cat make mayonnaise fly off the shelves in a high-concept spot that has something to do with food waste. Would have been better, and $7 million cheaper, at 30 seconds.

Women chant “hot flash” and “not flash” to promote the prescription menopause medication. Lukewarm.

Various celebrities forget things because of the brain space required to remember everything Uber Eats delivers; for example, Jennifer Aniston forgets David Schwimmer. Maybe they could have ordered a less labored premise?

The messaging app tries to sell itself by putting down the features that characterize other social media. Hey, I like likes!

The Flagrant Missteps

Famous people and millions of dollars that together can’t quite amount to mediocrity.

Dan Marino, Terrell Owens and Bruce Smith receive rings for having come close to winning the Super Bowl. Scarlett Johansson’s cameo can’t save it.

CrowdStrike

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e.l.f. Cosmetics

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Miller Lite

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Dan Levy of “Schitt’s Creek” and Heidi Gardner of “Saturday Night Live” run through various frenetic scenarios in a series of ads for the online real estate company. Could have used more Jeff Goldblum.

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It takes real effort to be this bad .

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The Chinese e-commerce company repeated its “shop like a billionaire” theme from last year, with an animated young woman spinning through a world of merchandise. Positing that everything we see has a price tag may be realistic but should it inspire you to shop?

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Toyota Tacomas tool around the desert while people in the passenger seat make bug eyes and hold the grab handle for dear life. Unlikely to grab you.

The comedian Eric André, ill on a plane, is tended to by an ice cream cone named Dr. Umstick. Apparently there wasn’t a writer on board.

The former Patriots star Rob Gronkowski misses a field goal live, losing money for some bettors and winning it for others. Lame right. (A later, recorded spot offered a tribute to the actor Carl Weathers , who died Feb. 1.)

Mike Hale is a television critic for The Times. He also writes about online video, film and media. More about Mike Hale

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Francesca Sloane, the showrunner of “Mr. & Mrs. Smith,” based on the 2005 film of the same name, has made the movie’s famously flawless heroes fallible  in the new Amazon series.

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  1. Rhetorical Analysis of John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Speech by Julie Moore

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  2. 😍 John f kennedy inaugural speech rhetorical analysis. John F. Kennedy

    john f kennedy rhetorical analysis essay

  3. Analysis Of Rhetorical Strategies Used By John F. Kennedy In His

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  4. John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Speech: Rhetorical Analysis Free Essay Example

    john f kennedy rhetorical analysis essay

  5. 😍 John f kennedy inaugural speech rhetorical analysis. John F. Kennedy

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  6. A Rhetorical Study of President John F. Kennedy's Ceremonial Speaking

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  1. JFK Speech

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  1. Analysis Of Rhetorical Strategies Used By John F. Kennedy In His

    Published: Sep 1, 2020 Read Summary Table of contents Prompt Examples for the "JFK Steel Speech Rhetorical Analysis" Essays Exploring Rhetorical Strategies Analyze the use of rhetorical strategies such as repetition, pathos, and direct address in John F. Kennedy's steel speech and how they contribute to the effectiveness of his message.

  2. Rhetorical and Literary Devices of John F. Kennedy's Speech

    Published: Sep 4, 2018 On September 12th, 1962, John F Kennedy - the United State's 35th President - stood before a crowd of 35,000 people at the stadium of Rice University, Houston, Texas, and presented an inspirational speech that pushed America forward in the space race.

  3. A Rhetorical Analysis of the Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

    Through his call to action and rhetorical appeals, he creates a sense of urgency to act sooner than later. Say no to plagiarism. Get a tailor-made essay on 'Why Violent Video Games Shouldn't Be Banned'? Get original essay

  4. PDF Sample Student Responses

    Rhetorical Analysis Free-Response Question (2020) Sample Student Responses 1 Sample A [1] Many Americans admired Kennedy and his administration when he was in the White House. He was a loved man. Many share in fond memories of Kennedy up until his death, when the nation grieved for him. In this speech, Ronald Reagan uses the appeal to pathos with

  5. PDF AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2012 SCORING GUIDELINES

    Essays earning a score of 8 effectively analyze∗ the rhetorical strategies President Kennedy uses to achieve his purpose. They develop their analysis with evidence and explanations that are appropriate and convincing, referring to the passage explicitly or implicitly.

  6. PDF Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK's Inaugural Address

    In this lesson plan, students consider the rhetorical devices in the address JFK delivered on January 20, 1961. They then analyze the suggestions made by Galbraith and Stevenson and compare them to the delivered version of the speech. Students then evaluate the impact of the changes on the resonance of the speech.

  7. PDF Rhetorical Analysis

    Write an essay that analyzes the rhetorical choices Reagan makes to achieve his purpose of paying tribute to John F. Kennedy. In your response you should do the following: Respond to the prompt with a thesis that analyzes the writer's rhetorical choices. Select and use evidence to support your line of reasoning.

  8. PDF Scoring Guidelines

    Rhetorical Analysis 6 points . The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, dedicated in 1979, was founded in memory of the president and contains archives pertaining to his administration. On June 24, 1985, then President Ronald Reagan joined members of the Kennedy family at a fundraising event to help the Kennedy

  9. Analyzing the Rhetoric of JFK's Inaugural Address

    examine the rhetorical devices of JFK's Inaugural Address. analyze the effects of the rhetorical devices on the delivered speech. Preparation. Historical Background and Context. On January 20, 1961, a clerk of the US Supreme Court held the large Fitzgerald family Bible as John F. Kennedy took the oath of office to become the nation's 35th ...

  10. Analysis of John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Speech

    Abstract This paper is an analysis of John F. Kennedy's inauguration speech. In Kennedy's speech he wants the American people and other nations to come together to gain rights and freedom. Kennedy includes his staff members, citizens, and other nations as his audience.

  11. JFK Inaugural Address

    On January 20, 1961, John Fitzgerald Kennedy ( JFK ), a Democrat from Massachusetts, was inaugurated as the 35th president of the United States. Taking office at the age of 43, he remains the ...

  12. Kennedy Rhetorical Analysis Essay

    Kennedy Rhetorical Analysis Essay. Essay analyzing JFK's rhetorical techniques in his speech. Course. Eng Composition I (ENG 105) 71 Documents. ... John F. Kennedy establishes a tone of admiration towards Robert Frost by using repetition to praise his ability to serve as a benchmark of humanity's judgement through his work. In the first ...

  13. John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Address: an Analysis

    This essay has been submitted by a student. John F. Kennedy gives his inaugural address to an audience of millions worldwide. His address is famous for his phrase "My fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you -- ask what you can do for your country.". As Kennedy delivered his speech, he took into consideration the ...

  14. Essay on Rhetorical Analysis of Jfk Civil Rights Address

    As a person who was known for his ability to speak publicly, and communicate comprehensible meanings while inspiring the people of his nation, President John F. Kennedy (JFK) gave his inaugural address on January 20th, 1961 in Washington D.C.. JFK was widely distinguished for his ability to use rhetoric in front of the masses, and in mass media.

  15. Rhetorical Analysis Of John F. Kennedy's 'Profiles In Courage'

    A Rhetorical Analysis Of Jfk Inaugural Address 838 Words | 4 Pages Ironically, Kennedy was not viewed by the public as such a candidate. Many Americans viewed Kennedy as inexperienced because of his youth. However, Kennedy's youth would be a pivotal factor in transforming the 1960s into a "New Frontier".

  16. John F Kennedy Rhetorical Analysis Essay

    6 Pages Open Document John Fitzgerald Kennedy represented the United States' pride, courage, perseverance, patriotism, and honor. He was able to incase the true persona of every proud American. Overall, the people loved President Kennedy. He represented a new generation of thought in the United States' society and world relationships.

  17. A Literary Analysis of an Inaugural Speech by John F. Kennedy

    A Rhetorical Analysis of the Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy Essay. ... Analysis of John F. Kennedy's Speech Essay. June 26, 1963, post WWII, a time were the United States and the Soviet Union were the world's superpowers. The two powers fought a war of different government and economic ideologies known as the Cold War.

  18. John F Kennedy Speech Rhetorical Analysis

    President John F. Kennedy, in his speech, uses rhetorical strategies such as diction, emotional appeals, and a persuasive tone to convince Americans that steel companies are declining the standards to maintain stable prices. Kennedy states that the steel companies are a national problem due to the increase of steel prices.

  19. Rhetorical Analysis Of President John F. Kennedy's Steel Companies

    340 Words2 Pages On April 11,1962, President John F. Kennedy, made a speech about the nation's largest steel companies raising the steel price by 3.5%. People in America got mad at this and Kennedy understood why the were getting mad. So, his conference agreed with the American people and said that the steel companies price was too high.

  20. John F. Kennedy Inaugural Speech Rhetorical Analysis

    John F. Kennedy Inaugural Speech Rhetorical Analysis Category: Last Updated: Pages: Download This paper is an analysis of John F. Kennedy's inauguration speech. In Kennedy's speech he wants the American people and other nations to come together to gain rights and freedom.

  21. Rhetorical Analysis Of John F. Kennedy's Inaugural Speech

    John F Kennedy Inaugural Address Rhetorical Analysis. On January 20, 1961, President John F. Kennedy delivered a powerful and moving Inaugural Address to thousands of people across the nation. The Cold War, which divided the globe, was a leading topic from the start of the 1960 election. The United States and the Soviet Union alike threatened ...

  22. Assignment #3 Rhetorical Analysis Essay

    Assignment #3 Rhetorical Analysis Essay; Essay #2 9wk 3-Risk; Argumentative test - Complete instructor given essay. Texas Oil - Complete instructor given essay. ... On January 20th, 1961 The current president of the United States, John F. Kennedy gave his Presidential inaugural Address speech (John F. Kennedy -- Inaugural Address ...

  23. John F. Kennedy Civil Rights Speech Rhetorical Analysis Essay

    John F. Kennedy says how racism causes people to lash out and hurt others just because of the color of their skin, and John F. Kennedy believes if segregation ends then so too will this type of violence (Kennedy). John F. Kennedy wants to make it clear that America has made its fair share of mistakes in regard to race relations, but that John F ...

  24. The Super Bowl Ads, Ranked

    A youngster imagines playing American football as he runs through a crowded Ghanaian market accompanied by N.F.L. players, then emerges into an N.F.L. international training program and encounters ...