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How to Write a Thesis Statement | 4 Steps & Examples

Published on January 11, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on August 15, 2023 by Eoghan Ryan.

A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . It usually comes near the end of your introduction .

Your thesis will look a bit different depending on the type of essay you’re writing. But the thesis statement should always clearly state the main idea you want to get across. Everything else in your essay should relate back to this idea.

You can write your thesis statement by following four simple steps:

  • Start with a question
  • Write your initial answer
  • Develop your answer
  • Refine your thesis statement

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Table of contents

What is a thesis statement, placement of the thesis statement, step 1: start with a question, step 2: write your initial answer, step 3: develop your answer, step 4: refine your thesis statement, types of thesis statements, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about thesis statements.

A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay. It is a signpost telling the reader what the essay will argue and why.

The best thesis statements are:

  • Concise: A good thesis statement is short and sweet—don’t use more words than necessary. State your point clearly and directly in one or two sentences.
  • Contentious: Your thesis shouldn’t be a simple statement of fact that everyone already knows. A good thesis statement is a claim that requires further evidence or analysis to back it up.
  • Coherent: Everything mentioned in your thesis statement must be supported and explained in the rest of your paper.

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The thesis statement generally appears at the end of your essay introduction or research paper introduction .

The spread of the internet has had a world-changing effect, not least on the world of education. The use of the internet in academic contexts and among young people more generally is hotly debated. For many who did not grow up with this technology, its effects seem alarming and potentially harmful. This concern, while understandable, is misguided. The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education: the internet facilitates easier access to information, exposure to different perspectives, and a flexible learning environment for both students and teachers.

You should come up with an initial thesis, sometimes called a working thesis , early in the writing process . As soon as you’ve decided on your essay topic , you need to work out what you want to say about it—a clear thesis will give your essay direction and structure.

You might already have a question in your assignment, but if not, try to come up with your own. What would you like to find out or decide about your topic?

For example, you might ask:

After some initial research, you can formulate a tentative answer to this question. At this stage it can be simple, and it should guide the research process and writing process .

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Now you need to consider why this is your answer and how you will convince your reader to agree with you. As you read more about your topic and begin writing, your answer should get more detailed.

In your essay about the internet and education, the thesis states your position and sketches out the key arguments you’ll use to support it.

The negatives of internet use are outweighed by its many benefits for education because it facilitates easier access to information.

In your essay about braille, the thesis statement summarizes the key historical development that you’ll explain.

The invention of braille in the 19th century transformed the lives of blind people, allowing them to participate more actively in public life.

A strong thesis statement should tell the reader:

  • Why you hold this position
  • What they’ll learn from your essay
  • The key points of your argument or narrative

The final thesis statement doesn’t just state your position, but summarizes your overall argument or the entire topic you’re going to explain. To strengthen a weak thesis statement, it can help to consider the broader context of your topic.

These examples are more specific and show that you’ll explore your topic in depth.

Your thesis statement should match the goals of your essay, which vary depending on the type of essay you’re writing:

  • In an argumentative essay , your thesis statement should take a strong position. Your aim in the essay is to convince your reader of this thesis based on evidence and logical reasoning.
  • In an expository essay , you’ll aim to explain the facts of a topic or process. Your thesis statement doesn’t have to include a strong opinion in this case, but it should clearly state the central point you want to make, and mention the key elements you’ll explain.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your paper or essay . Everything else you write should relate to this key idea.

The thesis statement is essential in any academic essay or research paper for two main reasons:

  • It gives your writing direction and focus.
  • It gives the reader a concise summary of your main point.

Without a clear thesis statement, an essay can end up rambling and unfocused, leaving your reader unsure of exactly what you want to say.

Follow these four steps to come up with a thesis statement :

  • Ask a question about your topic .
  • Write your initial answer.
  • Develop your answer by including reasons.
  • Refine your answer, adding more detail and nuance.

The thesis statement should be placed at the end of your essay introduction .

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Home / Guides / Writing Guides / Parts of a Paper / How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

A thesis can be found in many places—a debate speech, a lawyer’s closing argument, even an advertisement. But the most common place for a thesis statement (and probably why you’re reading this article) is in an essay.

Whether you’re writing an argumentative paper, an informative essay, or a compare/contrast statement, you need a thesis. Without a thesis, your argument falls flat and your information is unfocused. Since a thesis is so important, it’s probably a good idea to look at some tips on how to put together a strong one.

Guide Overview

What is a “thesis statement” anyway.

  • 2 categories of thesis statements: informative and persuasive
  • 2 styles of thesis statements
  • Formula for a strong argumentative thesis
  • The qualities of a solid thesis statement (video)

You may have heard of something called a “thesis.” It’s what seniors commonly refer to as their final paper before graduation. That’s not what we’re talking about here. That type of thesis is a long, well-written paper that takes years to piece together.

Instead, we’re talking about a single sentence that ties together the main idea of any argument . In the context of student essays, it’s a statement that summarizes your topic and declares your position on it. This sentence can tell a reader whether your essay is something they want to read.

2 Categories of Thesis Statements: Informative and Persuasive

Just as there are different types of essays, there are different types of thesis statements. The thesis should match the essay.

For example, with an informative essay, you should compose an informative thesis (rather than argumentative). You want to declare your intentions in this essay and guide the reader to the conclusion that you reach.

To make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, you must procure the ingredients, find a knife, and spread the condiments.

This thesis showed the reader the topic (a type of sandwich) and the direction the essay will take (describing how the sandwich is made).

Most other types of essays, whether compare/contrast, argumentative, or narrative, have thesis statements that take a position and argue it. In other words, unless your purpose is simply to inform, your thesis is considered persuasive. A persuasive thesis usually contains an opinion and the reason why your opinion is true.

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are the best type of sandwich because they are versatile, easy to make, and taste good.

In this persuasive thesis statement, you see that I state my opinion (the best type of sandwich), which means I have chosen a stance. Next, I explain that my opinion is correct with several key reasons. This persuasive type of thesis can be used in any essay that contains the writer’s opinion, including, as I mentioned above, compare/contrast essays, narrative essays, and so on.

2 Styles of Thesis Statements

Just as there are two different types of thesis statements (informative and persuasive), there are two basic styles you can use.

The first style uses a list of two or more points . This style of thesis is perfect for a brief essay that contains only two or three body paragraphs. This basic five-paragraph essay is typical of middle and high school assignments.

C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia series is one of the richest works of the 20th century because it offers an escape from reality, teaches readers to have faith even when they don’t understand, and contains a host of vibrant characters.

In the above persuasive thesis, you can see my opinion about Narnia followed by three clear reasons. This thesis is perfect for setting up a tidy five-paragraph essay.

In college, five paragraph essays become few and far between as essay length gets longer. Can you imagine having only five paragraphs in a six-page paper? For a longer essay, you need a thesis statement that is more versatile. Instead of listing two or three distinct points, a thesis can list one overarching point that all body paragraphs tie into.

Good vs. evil is the main theme of Lewis’s Narnia series, as is made clear through the struggles the main characters face in each book.

In this thesis, I have made a claim about the theme in Narnia followed by my reasoning. The broader scope of this thesis allows me to write about each of the series’ seven novels. I am no longer limited in how many body paragraphs I can logically use.

Formula for a Strong Argumentative Thesis

One thing I find that is helpful for students is having a clear template. While students rarely end up with a thesis that follows this exact wording, the following template creates a good starting point:

___________ is true because of ___________, ___________, and ___________.

Conversely, the formula for a thesis with only one point might follow this template:

___________________ is true because of _____________________.

Students usually end up using different terminology than simply “because,” but having a template is always helpful to get the creative juices flowing.

The Qualities of a Solid Thesis Statement

When composing a thesis, you must consider not only the format, but other qualities like length, position in the essay, and how strong the argument is.

Length: A thesis statement can be short or long, depending on how many points it mentions. Typically, however, it is only one concise sentence. It does contain at least two clauses, usually an independent clause (the opinion) and a dependent clause (the reasons). You probably should aim for a single sentence that is at least two lines, or about 30 to 40 words long.

Position: A thesis statement always belongs at the beginning of an essay. This is because it is a sentence that tells the reader what the writer is going to discuss. Teachers will have different preferences for the precise location of the thesis, but a good rule of thumb is in the introduction paragraph, within the last two or three sentences.

Strength: Finally, for a persuasive thesis to be strong, it needs to be arguable. This means that the statement is not obvious, and it is not something that everyone agrees is true.

Example of weak thesis:

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are easy to make because it just takes three ingredients.

Most people would agree that PB&J is one of the easiest sandwiches in the American lunch repertoire.

Example of a stronger thesis:

Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are fun to eat because they always slide around.

This is more arguable because there are plenty of folks who might think a PB&J is messy or slimy rather than fun.

Composing a thesis statement does take a bit more thought than many other parts of an essay. However, because a thesis statement can contain an entire argument in just a few words, it is worth taking the extra time to compose this sentence. It can direct your research and your argument so that your essay is tight, focused, and makes readers think.

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Developing a Thesis Statement

Many papers you write require developing a thesis statement. In this section you’ll learn what a thesis statement is and how to write one.

Keep in mind that not all papers require thesis statements . If in doubt, please consult your instructor for assistance.

What is a thesis statement?

A thesis statement . . .

  • Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic.
  • Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper.
  • Is focused and specific enough to be “proven” within the boundaries of your paper.
  • Is generally located near the end of the introduction ; sometimes, in a long paper, the thesis will be expressed in several sentences or in an entire paragraph.
  • Identifies the relationships between the pieces of evidence that you are using to support your argument.

Not all papers require thesis statements! Ask your instructor if you’re in doubt whether you need one.

Identify a topic

Your topic is the subject about which you will write. Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic; or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper.

Consider what your assignment asks you to do

Inform yourself about your topic, focus on one aspect of your topic, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts, generate a topic from an assignment.

Below are some possible topics based on sample assignments.

Sample assignment 1

Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II.

Identified topic

Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis

This topic avoids generalities such as “Spain” and “World War II,” addressing instead on Franco’s role (a specific aspect of “Spain”) and the diplomatic relations between the Allies and Axis (a specific aspect of World War II).

Sample assignment 2

Analyze one of Homer’s epic similes in the Iliad.

The relationship between the portrayal of warfare and the epic simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64.

This topic focuses on a single simile and relates it to a single aspect of the Iliad ( warfare being a major theme in that work).

Developing a Thesis Statement–Additional information

Your assignment may suggest several ways of looking at a topic, or it may name a fairly general concept that you will explore or analyze in your paper. You’ll want to read your assignment carefully, looking for key terms that you can use to focus your topic.

Sample assignment: Analyze Spain’s neutrality in World War II Key terms: analyze, Spain’s neutrality, World War II

After you’ve identified the key words in your topic, the next step is to read about them in several sources, or generate as much information as possible through an analysis of your topic. Obviously, the more material or knowledge you have, the more possibilities will be available for a strong argument. For the sample assignment above, you’ll want to look at books and articles on World War II in general, and Spain’s neutrality in particular.

As you consider your options, you must decide to focus on one aspect of your topic. This means that you cannot include everything you’ve learned about your topic, nor should you go off in several directions. If you end up covering too many different aspects of a topic, your paper will sprawl and be unconvincing in its argument, and it most likely will not fulfull the assignment requirements.

For the sample assignment above, both Spain’s neutrality and World War II are topics far too broad to explore in a paper. You may instead decide to focus on Franco’s role in the diplomatic relationships between the Allies and the Axis , which narrows down what aspects of Spain’s neutrality and World War II you want to discuss, as well as establishes a specific link between those two aspects.

Before you go too far, however, ask yourself whether your topic is worthy of your efforts. Try to avoid topics that already have too much written about them (i.e., “eating disorders and body image among adolescent women”) or that simply are not important (i.e. “why I like ice cream”). These topics may lead to a thesis that is either dry fact or a weird claim that cannot be supported. A good thesis falls somewhere between the two extremes. To arrive at this point, ask yourself what is new, interesting, contestable, or controversial about your topic.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times . Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Derive a main point from topic

Once you have a topic, you will have to decide what the main point of your paper will be. This point, the “controlling idea,” becomes the core of your argument (thesis statement) and it is the unifying idea to which you will relate all your sub-theses. You can then turn this “controlling idea” into a purpose statement about what you intend to do in your paper.

Look for patterns in your evidence

Compose a purpose statement.

Consult the examples below for suggestions on how to look for patterns in your evidence and construct a purpose statement.

  • Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis
  • Franco turned to the Allies when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from the Axis

Possible conclusion:

Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: Franco’s desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power.

Purpose statement

This paper will analyze Franco’s diplomacy during World War II to see how it contributed to Spain’s neutrality.
  • The simile compares Simoisius to a tree, which is a peaceful, natural image.
  • The tree in the simile is chopped down to make wheels for a chariot, which is an object used in warfare.

At first, the simile seems to take the reader away from the world of warfare, but we end up back in that world by the end.

This paper will analyze the way the simile about Simoisius at 4.547-64 moves in and out of the world of warfare.

Derive purpose statement from topic

To find out what your “controlling idea” is, you have to examine and evaluate your evidence . As you consider your evidence, you may notice patterns emerging, data repeated in more than one source, or facts that favor one view more than another. These patterns or data may then lead you to some conclusions about your topic and suggest that you can successfully argue for one idea better than another.

For instance, you might find out that Franco first tried to negotiate with the Axis, but when he couldn’t get some concessions that he wanted from them, he turned to the Allies. As you read more about Franco’s decisions, you may conclude that Spain’s neutrality in WWII occurred for an entirely personal reason: his desire to preserve his own (and Spain’s) power. Based on this conclusion, you can then write a trial thesis statement to help you decide what material belongs in your paper.

Sometimes you won’t be able to find a focus or identify your “spin” or specific argument immediately. Like some writers, you might begin with a purpose statement just to get yourself going. A purpose statement is one or more sentences that announce your topic and indicate the structure of the paper but do not state the conclusions you have drawn . Thus, you might begin with something like this:

  • This paper will look at modern language to see if it reflects male dominance or female oppression.
  • I plan to analyze anger and derision in offensive language to see if they represent a challenge of society’s authority.

At some point, you can turn a purpose statement into a thesis statement. As you think and write about your topic, you can restrict, clarify, and refine your argument, crafting your thesis statement to reflect your thinking.

As you work on your thesis, remember to keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Sometimes your thesis needs to evolve as you develop new insights, find new evidence, or take a different approach to your topic.

Compose a draft thesis statement

If you are writing a paper that will have an argumentative thesis and are having trouble getting started, the techniques in the table below may help you develop a temporary or “working” thesis statement.

Begin with a purpose statement that you will later turn into a thesis statement.

Assignment: Discuss the history of the Reform Party and explain its influence on the 1990 presidential and Congressional election.

Purpose Statement: This paper briefly sketches the history of the grassroots, conservative, Perot-led Reform Party and analyzes how it influenced the economic and social ideologies of the two mainstream parties.

Question-to-Assertion

If your assignment asks a specific question(s), turn the question(s) into an assertion and give reasons why it is true or reasons for your opinion.

Assignment : What do Aylmer and Rappaccini have to be proud of? Why aren’t they satisfied with these things? How does pride, as demonstrated in “The Birthmark” and “Rappaccini’s Daughter,” lead to unexpected problems?

Beginning thesis statement: Alymer and Rappaccinni are proud of their great knowledge; however, they are also very greedy and are driven to use their knowledge to alter some aspect of nature as a test of their ability. Evil results when they try to “play God.”

Write a sentence that summarizes the main idea of the essay you plan to write.

Main idea: The reason some toys succeed in the market is that they appeal to the consumers’ sense of the ridiculous and their basic desire to laugh at themselves.

Make a list of the ideas that you want to include; consider the ideas and try to group them.

  • nature = peaceful
  • war matériel = violent (competes with 1?)
  • need for time and space to mourn the dead
  • war is inescapable (competes with 3?)

Use a formula to arrive at a working thesis statement (you will revise this later).

  • although most readers of _______ have argued that _______, closer examination shows that _______.
  • _______ uses _______ and _____ to prove that ________.
  • phenomenon x is a result of the combination of __________, __________, and _________.

What to keep in mind as you draft an initial thesis statement

Beginning statements obtained through the methods illustrated above can serve as a framework for planning or drafting your paper, but remember they’re not yet the specific, argumentative thesis you want for the final version of your paper. In fact, in its first stages, a thesis statement usually is ill-formed or rough and serves only as a planning tool.

As you write, you may discover evidence that does not fit your temporary or “working” thesis. Or you may reach deeper insights about your topic as you do more research, and you will find that your thesis statement has to be more complicated to match the evidence that you want to use.

You must be willing to reject or omit some evidence in order to keep your paper cohesive and your reader focused. Or you may have to revise your thesis to match the evidence and insights that you want to discuss. Read your draft carefully, noting the conclusions you have drawn and the major ideas which support or prove those conclusions. These will be the elements of your final thesis statement.

Sometimes you will not be able to identify these elements in your early drafts, but as you consider how your argument is developing and how your evidence supports your main idea, ask yourself, “ What is the main point that I want to prove/discuss? ” and “ How will I convince the reader that this is true? ” When you can answer these questions, then you can begin to refine the thesis statement.

Refine and polish the thesis statement

To get to your final thesis, you’ll need to refine your draft thesis so that it’s specific and arguable.

  • Ask if your draft thesis addresses the assignment
  • Question each part of your draft thesis
  • Clarify vague phrases and assertions
  • Investigate alternatives to your draft thesis

Consult the example below for suggestions on how to refine your draft thesis statement.

Sample Assignment

Choose an activity and define it as a symbol of American culture. Your essay should cause the reader to think critically about the society which produces and enjoys that activity.

  • Ask The phenomenon of drive-in facilities is an interesting symbol of american culture, and these facilities demonstrate significant characteristics of our society.This statement does not fulfill the assignment because it does not require the reader to think critically about society.
Drive-ins are an interesting symbol of American culture because they represent Americans’ significant creativity and business ingenuity.
Among the types of drive-in facilities familiar during the twentieth century, drive-in movie theaters best represent American creativity, not merely because they were the forerunner of later drive-ins and drive-throughs, but because of their impact on our culture: they changed our relationship to the automobile, changed the way people experienced movies, and changed movie-going into a family activity.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast-food establishments, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize America’s economic ingenuity, they also have affected our personal standards.
While drive-in facilities such as those at fast- food restaurants, banks, pharmacies, and dry cleaners symbolize (1) Americans’ business ingenuity, they also have contributed (2) to an increasing homogenization of our culture, (3) a willingness to depersonalize relationships with others, and (4) a tendency to sacrifice quality for convenience.

This statement is now specific and fulfills all parts of the assignment. This version, like any good thesis, is not self-evident; its points, 1-4, will have to be proven with evidence in the body of the paper. The numbers in this statement indicate the order in which the points will be presented. Depending on the length of the paper, there could be one paragraph for each numbered item or there could be blocks of paragraph for even pages for each one.

Complete the final thesis statement

The bottom line.

As you move through the process of crafting a thesis, you’ll need to remember four things:

  • Context matters! Think about your course materials and lectures. Try to relate your thesis to the ideas your instructor is discussing.
  • As you go through the process described in this section, always keep your assignment in mind . You will be more successful when your thesis (and paper) responds to the assignment than if it argues a semi-related idea.
  • Your thesis statement should be precise, focused, and contestable ; it should predict the sub-theses or blocks of information that you will use to prove your argument.
  • Make sure that you keep the rest of your paper in mind at all times. Change your thesis as your paper evolves, because you do not want your thesis to promise more than your paper actually delivers.

In the beginning, the thesis statement was a tool to help you sharpen your focus, limit material and establish the paper’s purpose. When your paper is finished, however, the thesis statement becomes a tool for your reader. It tells the reader what you have learned about your topic and what evidence led you to your conclusion. It keeps the reader on track–well able to understand and appreciate your argument.

how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

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Tips and Examples for Writing Thesis Statements

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This resource provides tips for creating a thesis statement and examples of different types of thesis statements.

Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement

1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing:

  • An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.
  • An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.
  • An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies this claim with specific evidence. The claim could be an opinion, a policy proposal, an evaluation, a cause-and-effect statement, or an interpretation. The goal of the argumentative paper is to convince the audience that the claim is true based on the evidence provided.

If you are writing a text that does not fall under these three categories (e.g., a narrative), a thesis statement somewhere in the first paragraph could still be helpful to your reader.

2. Your thesis statement should be specific—it should cover only what you will discuss in your paper and should be supported with specific evidence.

3. The thesis statement usually appears at the end of the first paragraph of a paper.

4. Your topic may change as you write, so you may need to revise your thesis statement to reflect exactly what you have discussed in the paper.

Thesis Statement Examples

Example of an analytical thesis statement:

The paper that follows should:

  • Explain the analysis of the college admission process
  • Explain the challenge facing admissions counselors

Example of an expository (explanatory) thesis statement:

  • Explain how students spend their time studying, attending class, and socializing with peers

Example of an argumentative thesis statement:

  • Present an argument and give evidence to support the claim that students should pursue community projects before entering college
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How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

Allison Bressmer

Allison Bressmer

How to write a persuasive essay

Most composition classes you’ll take will teach the art of persuasive writing. That’s a good thing.

Knowing where you stand on issues and knowing how to argue for or against something is a skill that will serve you well both inside and outside of the classroom.

Persuasion is the art of using logic to prompt audiences to change their mind or take action , and is generally seen as accomplishing that goal by appealing to emotions and feelings.

A persuasive essay is one that attempts to get a reader to agree with your perspective.

What is a persuasive essay?

Ready for some tips on how to produce a well-written, well-rounded, well-structured persuasive essay? Just say yes. I don’t want to have to write another essay to convince you!

How Do I Write a Persuasive Essay?

What are some good topics for a persuasive essay, how do i identify an audience for my persuasive essay, how do you create an effective persuasive essay, how should i edit my persuasive essay.

Your persuasive essay needs to have the three components required of any essay: the introduction , body , and conclusion .

That is essay structure. However, there is flexibility in that structure.

There is no rule (unless the assignment has specific rules) for how many paragraphs any of those sections need.

Although the components should be proportional; the body paragraphs will comprise most of your persuasive essay.

What should every essay include?

How Do I Start a Persuasive Essay?

As with any essay introduction, this paragraph is where you grab your audience’s attention, provide context for the topic of discussion, and present your thesis statement.

TIP 1: Some writers find it easier to write their introductions last. As long as you have your working thesis, this is a perfectly acceptable approach. From that thesis, you can plan your body paragraphs and then go back and write your introduction.

TIP 2: Avoid “announcing” your thesis. Don’t include statements like this:

  • “In my essay I will show why extinct animals should (not) be regenerated.”
  • “The purpose of my essay is to argue that extinct animals should (not) be regenerated.”

Announcements take away from the originality, authority, and sophistication of your writing.

Instead, write a convincing thesis statement that answers the question "so what?" Why is the topic important, what do you think about it, and why do you think that? Be specific.

How Many Paragraphs Should a Persuasive Essay Have?

This body of your persuasive essay is the section in which you develop the arguments that support your thesis. Consider these questions as you plan this section of your essay:

  • What arguments support your thesis?
  • What is the best order for your arguments?
  • What evidence do you have?
  • Will you address the opposing argument to your own?
  • How can you conclude convincingly?

The body of a persuasive essay

TIP: Brainstorm and do your research before you decide which arguments you’ll focus on in your discussion. Make a list of possibilities and go with the ones that are strongest, that you can discuss with the most confidence, and that help you balance your rhetorical triangle .

What Should I Put in the Conclusion of a Persuasive Essay?

The conclusion is your “mic-drop” moment. Think about how you can leave your audience with a strong final comment.

And while a conclusion often re-emphasizes the main points of a discussion, it shouldn’t simply repeat them.

TIP 1: Be careful not to introduce a new argument in the conclusion—there’s no time to develop it now that you’ve reached the end of your discussion!

TIP 2 : As with your thesis, avoid announcing your conclusion. Don’t start your conclusion with “in conclusion” or “to conclude” or “to end my essay” type statements. Your audience should be able to see that you are bringing the discussion to a close without those overused, less sophisticated signals.

The conclusion of a persuasive essay

If your instructor has assigned you a topic, then you’ve already got your issue; you’ll just have to determine where you stand on the issue. Where you stand on your topic is your position on that topic.

Your position will ultimately become the thesis of your persuasive essay: the statement the rest of the essay argues for and supports, intending to convince your audience to consider your point of view.

If you have to choose your own topic, use these guidelines to help you make your selection:

  • Choose an issue you truly care about
  • Choose an issue that is actually debatable

Simple “tastes” (likes and dislikes) can’t really be argued. No matter how many ways someone tries to convince me that milk chocolate rules, I just won’t agree.

It’s dark chocolate or nothing as far as my tastes are concerned.

Similarly, you can’t convince a person to “like” one film more than another in an essay.

You could argue that one movie has superior qualities than another: cinematography, acting, directing, etc. but you can’t convince a person that the film really appeals to them.

Debatable and non-debatable concepts

Once you’ve selected your issue, determine your position just as you would for an assigned topic. That position will ultimately become your thesis.

Until you’ve finalized your work, consider your thesis a “working thesis.”

This means that your statement represents your position, but you might change its phrasing or structure for that final version.

When you’re writing an essay for a class, it can seem strange to identify an audience—isn’t the audience the instructor?

Your instructor will read and evaluate your essay, and may be part of your greater audience, but you shouldn’t just write for your teacher.

Think about who your intended audience is.

For an argument essay, think of your audience as the people who disagree with you—the people who need convincing.

That population could be quite broad, for example, if you’re arguing a political issue, or narrow, if you’re trying to convince your parents to extend your curfew.

Once you’ve got a sense of your audience, it’s time to consult with Aristotle. Aristotle’s teaching on persuasion has shaped communication since about 330 BC. Apparently, it works.

Ethos, pathos and logos

Aristotle taught that in order to convince an audience of something, the communicator needs to balance the three elements of the rhetorical triangle to achieve the best results.

Those three elements are ethos , logos , and pathos .

Ethos relates to credibility and trustworthiness. How can you, as the writer, demonstrate your credibility as a source of information to your audience?

How will you show them you are worthy of their trust?

How to make your essay credible

  • You show you’ve done your research: you understand the issue, both sides
  • You show respect for the opposing side: if you disrespect your audience, they won’t respect you or your ideas

Logos relates to logic. How will you convince your audience that your arguments and ideas are reasonable?

How to use logic in essays

You provide facts or other supporting evidence to support your claims.

That evidence may take the form of studies or expert input or reasonable examples or a combination of all of those things, depending on the specific requirements of your assignment.

Remember: if you use someone else’s ideas or words in your essay, you need to give them credit.

ProWritingAid's Plagiarism Checker checks your work against over a billion web-pages, published works, and academic papers so you can be sure of its originality.

Find out more about ProWritingAid’s Plagiarism checks.

Pathos relates to emotion. Audiences are people and people are emotional beings. We respond to emotional prompts. How will you engage your audience with your arguments on an emotional level?

How to use emotion in essays

  • You make strategic word choices : words have denotations (dictionary meanings) and also connotations, or emotional values. Use words whose connotations will help prompt the feelings you want your audience to experience.
  • You use emotionally engaging examples to support your claims or make a point, prompting your audience to be moved by your discussion.

Be mindful as you lean into elements of the triangle. Too much pathos and your audience might end up feeling manipulated, roll their eyes and move on.

An “all logos” approach will leave your essay dry and without a sense of voice; it will probably bore your audience rather than make them care.

Once you’ve got your essay planned, start writing! Don’t worry about perfection, just get your ideas out of your head and off your list and into a rough essay format.

After you’ve written your draft, evaluate your work. What works and what doesn’t? For help with evaluating and revising your work, check out this ProWritingAid post on manuscript revision .

After you’ve evaluated your draft, revise it. Repeat that process as many times as you need to make your work the best it can be.

When you’re satisfied with the content and structure of the essay, take it through the editing process .

Grammatical or sentence-level errors can distract your audience or even detract from the ethos—the authority—of your work.

You don’t have to edit alone! ProWritingAid’s Realtime Report will find errors and make suggestions for improvements.

You can even use it on emails to your professors:

ProWritingAid's Realtime Report

Try ProWritingAid with a free account.

How Can I Improve My Persuasion Skills?

You can develop your powers of persuasion every day just by observing what’s around you.

  • How is that advertisement working to convince you to buy a product?
  • How is a political candidate arguing for you to vote for them?
  • How do you “argue” with friends about what to do over the weekend, or convince your boss to give you a raise?
  • How are your parents working to convince you to follow a certain academic or career path?

As you observe these arguments in action, evaluate them. Why are they effective or why do they fail?

How could an argument be strengthened with more (or less) emphasis on ethos, logos, and pathos?

Every argument is an opportunity to learn! Observe them, evaluate them, and use them to perfect your own powers of persuasion.

how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

Be confident about grammar

Check every email, essay, or story for grammar mistakes. Fix them before you press send.

Allison Bressmer is a professor of freshman composition and critical reading at a community college and a freelance writer. If she isn’t writing or teaching, you’ll likely find her reading a book or listening to a podcast while happily sipping a semi-sweet iced tea or happy-houring with friends. She lives in New York with her family. Connect at linkedin.com/in/allisonbressmer.

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How to Create a Thesis Statement for a Persuasive Essay

A strong thesis statement is key to writing a persuasive essay. The thesis statement presents your topic to the reader, provides your opinion on that topic and summarizes the argument you’ll make in the paper by offering evidence for your opinion. A good thesis statement should capture all of these essential details in just one or two sentences. The thesis statement generally appears after a brief introduction of your topic, often as the last sentence of your first paragraph. The following information will help you write a thesis statement for a persuasive essay.

Express an Opinion

When you sit down to write a thesis statement, make sure that you have a clear opinion about your topic. That’s because a thesis statement must include a claim that others might dispute. Your thesis summarizes the argument you’ll be making in your paper, so you want to make sure that your point of view is clear and debatable. An easy way to test your thesis is to ask yourself whether your reader could challenge or oppose your thesis statement. If your thesis simply states facts that someone couldn’t disagree with, you may simply be summarizing an issue rather than presenting a clear point of view.

Be Specific

A strong thesis statement is focused and specific. The reader should know exactly what you’re going to argue and why. “Online education is a great choice for students” is a weak thesis because it’s not specific or focused enough. A stronger thesis would be, “Online classes are a better choice than traditional classroom learning because they’re more flexible for students and teachers, they're less expensive and they let students works at their own pace.”

Include Evidence

It’s important to include evidence in your thesis statement to help support your opinion. Doing so tells readers that you understand the topic and have performed some research, which gives you more credibility as a persuasive writer. It also creates a road map for readers, so they know what evidence you’ll discuss with more detail in the paper. For example, if your thesis is, “Companies should not test their products on animals because it’s inhumane and unethical, and it doesn’t always lead to accurate results,” the reader knows right away what your opinion is and what evidence you'll provide to support that opinion in your paper.

Pass the "How and Why" Test

Your thesis statement should answer one or both of two key questions: “how” and “why.” For example, if you think that online learning is more effective for students than traditional instruction, then your thesis should tell readers how or why it’s more effective. If a reader can't determine the "how" or "why" from your thesis statement, your thesis might be too open-ended, and you may need to revise it to be more specific or to clarify your point of view.

  • The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Thesis Statements
  • Purdue Online Writing Lab: Tips and Examples for Writing Thesis Statements
  • Odyssey: From Paragraph to Essay; William J. Kelly and Deborah L. Lawton.

Amy Mahoney has been a writer for more than 15 years. Her articles have appeared in newspapers and magazines including “The Boston Globe,” “Reader’s Digest” and the “Miami Herald.” She holds a Master of Fine Arts in fiction.

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Introductory paragraphs.

Attention Catchers

Attention catching techniques.

  • Asking a Question: This is my favorite technique because it can be used on any topic at any time. Additionally, it has a strong rhetorical effect on readers: people are conditioned to think about questions because answers are often expected of them. When you ask a question in your paper, readers are more likely to consider your ideas. As with any attention catcher, you’ll want to take your time making a good one that begins persuading your audience immediately.
  • Quotation: A wise person once said, “No matter what you’re trying to say, someone else has probably said it better.” I find that in most cases this statement is true. While you are unlikely to have access to the necessary resources to dig up quotes for a timed essay or standardized test, if you do have time (example: a high school application letter), using an appropriate quote is a classy way to start off your essay. Just be sure that the quote is connected to your topic in some easily identifiable way.
  • Stay on Point: as with everything in your paper, your attention catcher, especially if it is an anecdote, should be related to your topic and position.
  • Stay on Mode: Remember that you are writing a persuasive essay, not a narrative. Your anecdote should be limited to a few sentences, lest your writing may be perceived as off mode .
  • Startling Fact or Statistic: Did you know that two out of three persuasive essays do not begin with a proper attention catcher? Using a startling fact or statistic is another great way to pique the reader’s interest, assuming that you can locate just such a fact. I’ve heard other people suggest that students should fabricate facts or statistics when other sources are unavailable, but I personally don’t support that approach as it seems academically dishonest.
  • Imaginative Scenario: Picture this! You have forty-five minutes to write an essay and you need an attention catcher fast. What do you do? One way to do this is to create an imaginative scenario such as the one that I just described. Immerse your reader in an example of the problem and show them why they should care. Use descriptive writing and sensory details to either positively or negatively charge your writing; however, as with telling anecdotes, be careful not to stray off mode. Remember that your main purpose is to write arguments not to tell stories.
  • Combinations: You might find yourself using some hybrid of two or more of these techniques, which is completely acceptable. You can begin with an imaginative scenario and end with a question. Try something wild. When it comes to writing, the most restrictive limitations are the bounds of your own imagination. I encourage you to stretch those bindings whenever you have the opportunity.

Preview of Main Points

Body paragraphs.

Main Points

Topic sentences, supporting details, persuasive essay thought stems.

  • What I mean by this is…
  • Another way to say this is…
  • This connects to my argument because…
  • The reason for this is that…
  • To put it another way…
  • This shows that…
  • This is important because…
  • For example…

Making the Connection

Concluding paragraphs, restatement of points, clinching statements.

  • The Better World: The writer attempts to describe an idyllic scenario that will occur if their proposal is accepted. The sun will shine brighter and the sky will be bluer if the writer’s resolution is adopted, so to speak. Example: If students aren’t forced to wear uniforms, our school will have a much more pleasant and productive environment in which everyone will learn and grow.
  • The Worst Case Scenario: The writer again attempts to describe a scenario, this time imagining how bad the world might become if their proposal is rejected. Fear is a highly motivating emotion, so the writer should strive to make their scenario as frightful as possible without sounding ridiculous. Example: If students are required to wear uniforms, the environment of our school will become drab and colorless, and the structure of our hallowed institution will be further from a college and closer to a prison.
  • The Call to Action: Another good way to end your essay is to ask or demand that your reader take some action in support of your proposal. Perhaps you ask them to write a letter or email to their congressman or relevant authority. Perhaps you ask them to recycle their trash instead. The scope of your call is dependent on the topic. Example: If you understand how important it is for students to have the right to dress themselves, it is your civic duty to attend your local school counsel meeting and demand that this proposal be rejected.

86 Comments

Katrina hutchinson.

i love this and you should keep making more

i didnt mean to say that sorry i meant to say i love this and should keep making more videos like these

Austin Deines

I just want to thank you for your effort in helping to further student’s understanding of writing assignments. I’ve for one am very unfamiliar with college writing and greatly appreciate your guidance through this persuasive essay explanation.

Esra Ghozlan

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Mónica Fernández de Ortega

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I am so grateful for this tremendous work that provides instruction and creativity for students being homeschooled or in a traditional classroom. Kudos!!!

Alicia John

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Ng Lay Sion

Thank you so much for having this website. I feel like I have just found a pice of gold! I will be using your worksheets in my class and once again, thank you for your generosity and efforts.

Dhatri Singh

This website is really amazing!! I have just explored it partly yet, just seen the persuasive essay portion but found it really very helpful as I am preparing for a competition on this topic. Thanks a lot!!

lumnwi petar

persuasive piece #1 should students have less homework.

write and anrgument not a debate please!!!!

Both your video and online instructions and notes have been very helpful in demonstrating how to write an effective persuasive essay. Your information is presented clearly and concisely and in an appealing way. The examples your provide really made my middle school students understand and internalize the different aspects of effective essay writing! From one educator to another, thank you!

That’s kind of you to say. Thank you for visiting and taking the time to comment.

We teach students appreciation, so the least we can do is to truly thank you for your effort. It’s been really of a great help. You can’t imagine how such an explanation helped students here in my school NIS in KSA while writing their assignment. Again, thanks a lot. 🙂

Thanks this gave me a good understanding on how to write my essay!

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The Thesis Statement in a Persuasive Text

Alys Avalos-Rivera

In another chapter, we discussed the features of an informational essay. In this chapter, we will guide you to understand the essential elements of a similar type of academic text: the persuasive essay. Although informational and persuasive writing follow similar principles such as an orderly presentation of ideas that should be supported with evidence (e.g. facts, arguments, or examples), their purposes differ. The objective is written to take a stance (specific point of view) with respect to a controversial topic and persuade the audience to adopt the writer’s position. Because of this difference, the thesis statement of the persuasive essay needs to introduce the writer’s position in the controversy featured in the essay. Also, the preview of the essay’s structure should outline the arguments that the author will use to support his/her stance.

Should the US drinking age be lowered?

In the US, drinking alcoholic beverages is illegal for people under 21 years of age (minimum legal drinking age or MLDA). This law has long caused a great deal of disagreement and debates. While some people think it is paradoxical that young people of 18 cannot enter a bar but still go to war, others believe that the law is the best way to keep youth away from irresponsible and heavy drinking episodes (also called binge drinking). The following texts were written by readers of the New York Times” Room for Debate page to express their opinions about the subject. [1]

  • Read the comments and underline the readers’ main arguments (reasons to support one position or the other).
  • Identify which readers are against lowering the minimum drinking age (CON) and which are in favor (PRO)?
  • Which arguments seem the least convincing? Which are the most persuasive? Why?

Content focus: Rating thesis statements

Considering these features, in the following task you will analyze how six college students drafted their thesis statements for a persuasive essay on the MLDA controversy. In the prompt used by the instructor for this assignment, students were required to address the following purposes:

  • Present the PROs and CONs of the MLDA to a group of college students’ parents.
  • Persuade the parents to vote in favor of lowering the MLDA to 18 years of age.

In other words, the writers need to take a stance on the issue. Read the Thesis Statement and assess how well each one fulfills the purposes given above and to what extent. Rate the Thesis Statement using a scale from 1 to 6, where 6 will stand for the best Thesis Statement and 1 will be given to the poorest. Be prepared to explain the reasons you have to support your rating.

a. The United States has more accidents caused by drivers under the influence of alcohol than other countries where there is no MLDA (        )

b. Young people should be allowed to drink without legal restrictions based on their age, which is ridiculous (        )

c. Parents should teach their children how to drink alcohol in moderation.  (        )

d. Lowering the MLDA will allow parents to introduce their children to alcohol use under the supervision and reduce the rate of accidents caused by drunken drivers (        )

e. A reduction in the MLDA will help neutralize teenagers’ obsession with drinking, allow parents to monitor their children first encounters with alcohol, and reduce the rate of accidents caused by irresponsible drinking.   (        )

f. Having the MLDA fixed at 21 is only increasing young people’s fascination with drinking in unsafe environments and using false IDs.     (        )

Guidelines for a thesis statement

What should be considered when drafting a thesis statement for an essay that aims to persuade the audience to take a stand in a controversial issue? Think of some possible guidelines to write an effective persuasive TS taking into account the following:

  • How should you address your audience?
  • Where in your text should you introduce your stance?
  • What language features (words, phrases) could be useful?
  • How can you connect your TS with the main arguments you will use in your essay?

Write your guidelines below and discuss them with your colleagues and your instructor:

In some of the thesis statements listed above, the writers use modal verbs such as will and should . The first one ( will ) is used to predict the results that could be achieved if the authorities follow a specific course of action regarding the MLDA. The second one ( should ) is used to recommend what should be done with respect to the MLDA. These and other modal verbs that express advice, convey an obligation, or predict an outcome are often used to introduce the writer’s stance because they are useful to express the speaker’s desires, or his/her ideas of how the world should be. Other modal verbs that are also used with these purposes are: must, can, could, ought to, and also the semi-modal have to .

When using modal verbs to compose your thesis statement, however, you should be careful to select the one that best represents your purpose. The meaning of your thesis statement can change a great deal if you use one or the other. Read the following examples and explain how the meaning has changed with each modal (in bold):

*Although ought to and must are accepted as standard forms, they are not used in Academic English very often because they imply a strong and categorical position. Scientists usually abstain from categorical statements because these expressions do not convey that the writer remains open to new possibilities. Scientist prefer to maintain a more open attitude in their writing in case new evidence is discovered in the future that can change their points of view about the world.

Although the participants in the Room for Debate’s and Star Wars pages hold different points of view regarding very different topics, they all engaged in their online discussions with a common purpose: persuading their audience of their point of view. They do so in a succinct fashion because their audience does not usually invest much time in reading blog posts that are too long and complex. Therefore, effective blog/forum posters try to be direct and present one single point per post. On the contrary, academic persuasive writing needs to be more detailed and provide the audience with more than just the author’s point of view.

  • https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2015/02/10/you-must-be-21-to-drink ↵

The Thesis Statement in a Persuasive Text Copyright © 2020 by Alys Avalos-Rivera is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Jun 19, 2023

Thesis Statement Essay Examples: Master the Art of Persuasion with Strong Statements

Unlock persuasive writing by mastering strong thesis statements. Explore impactful examples that will empower your skills, captivate your audience, and enhance your essays. Step into the realm of influential writing today.

One of the most important aspects of producing great research papers or argumentative essays is knowing what constitutes a solid thesis statement. The thesis statement should be a claim that you intend to defend throughout the paper. You probably have a weak thesis statement if you're having trouble understanding your paper or its topic. If you'd like some extra help, you can try out our AI Thesis Statement Generation features - but it's always good to have a proper understanding of the process before using any AI tools to assist you with the process!

Let's take a step back and figure out what goes into a good thesis statement and what you should keep in mind when you craft your own.

What makes a Good Thesis Statement

A thesis statement often serves as the opening sentence of your essay. Ideally placed within the first few paragraphs, it acts as a bridge to the body of your essay, outlining your argument and paving the way for the evidential support that will follow.

Assert Your Position: The thesis statement is not a space for general assertions or facts. It should clearly specify your position on the subject, leaving room for debate. Rather than stating, "Puppies are cute and everybody knows it," a more persuasive and debatable statement might read, "A puppy's cuteness is attributed to its floppy ears, tiny body, and lively nature." This allows room for a counterargument, igniting a meaningful discussion.

Clarity: Your thesis should be concise and easily understandable, letting readers grasp your point of view with minimal effort. The language and topic should be chosen with consideration of your audience and the essay's objective.

Specificity: Your thesis should indicate the content of your essay or research paper. For instance, instead of a broad statement like "This paper discusses how technology influences relationships," a more precise thesis might be, "This research paper investigates how technology impacts interpersonal connections, the frequency of direct contact, and the average number of significant relationships among individuals aged 18 to 60."

Interest for readers: Your thesis should resonate with your audience, ensuring they care enough about the topic to continue reading.

Positioning: Your thesis should express your viewpoint, leaving room for counterarguments. Rather than stating "most traffic accidents involve drivers under 20," a more pointed thesis might be, "Given that the majority of traffic accidents involve drivers aged 16 to 19, the minimum driving age should be increased to 21."

Outlining: Your thesis should act as a guide for your essay, informing the reader about the topic and its significance. As your essay evolves, you might find that your thesis needs to be revised to accurately reflect the content.

Responding to a Prompt: Your thesis should directly answer the prompt or question your essay is responding to, making the central argument of your research clear.

Tips for Writing a Strong Thesis Statement:

Brainstorm: Start with a broad range of topics that pique your interest and will likely engage your audience. Collaborating with others, such as classmates or teachers, can help generate a diverse array of ideas.

Narrow your Focus: Your writing should aim to prove a specific point about your chosen topic. Your thesis should reflect this precision.

Understand the Task: Consider the essay format, objective, and target audience before crafting your thesis. Different types of essays serve different purposes, and this should be evident in your thesis.

Conduct Research: Use credible, up-to-date sources for your research. Academic databases are usually a reliable starting point.

Support Your Claim: Each claim in your thesis should be backed up by relevant evidence from your research.

Align Your Argument: Writers often draft the body of the essay before finalizing the thesis. Ensure that your thesis accurately reflects the evidence you present. If you find evidence that contradicts your thesis, consider incorporating that into your revisions.

How to Write a Good Thesis Statement

When asked to write a thesis statement, many students struggle for a long time since they are unsure of what should be included. A well-planned essay structure can be the key to a swift completion of that academic paper. So, with the help of our admission essay writing service, let's dissect the fundamentals of crafting a thesis statement.

Brainstorm ideas: Having a wide variety of potential writing themes is usually a good thing. This way, you can zero in on a topic that not only piques your curiosity but also holds the attention of your target audience. Working with others, such as classmates or teachers, can help you come up with a wealth of interesting concepts from which to choose a theme.

Narrow and focus: We must stress that generic details have no place in a professionally written piece. Writing is meant to prove a specific point on a topic. The thesis should accurately represent this.

Understand the essay format, goal, and target audience: Usually, they are assigned by the professor, but if you have some choice in the matter, you should know that they will have a significant impact on your thesis. A persuasive essay is written to persuade the reader to change their mind about a contentious issue. The purpose of a descriptive essay is to explain to the reader. Include at least one of these in your argument.

Conduct research: You need to perform some serious research using up-to-date, credible resources. Use academic databases as your primary source of information wherever possible.

Support your answer with reasoning: Pick out supporting details that speak to your argument. Make sure that you back up every claim you make with a relevant example in your research paper.

Check how it aligns: The majority of the time, writers will compose the essay's body paragraphs before they formulate the paper's thesis. It's not uncommon for writers to begin with one topic in mind and end up with another. As a result, double-check your essay to make sure the thesis stands up to the evidence you've presented. If you find proof refuting your main point, you should incorporate that into your revisions.

How many types of thesis statements are there?

So, now that you know the basics of developing a thesis statement, keep in mind that different authors will use different approaches. To provide a clearer illustration, we developed some sample thesis statements. The most common varieties of thesis statements are as follows:

Argumentative Thesis Statement

A good thesis statement sample for an argumentative paper will take a stand on the topic. Its purpose is to introduce the reader to your argument and set the stage for the rest of the essay. An argumentative thesis must present a proposition that can be debated by intelligent individuals.

Example: Since junk food is detrimental to health, the government should regulate the availability of soft drinks at fast food restaurants.

Analytical Thesis Statement

Looking beyond the obvious is essential for a solid example of an analytical essay. When formulating your analytical thesis statement, keep the following in mind. What is being asserted, what evidence supports it, and what does that imply? To what extent does this matter, and why?

Example: The world's continuous racism problem has repercussions in many areas of society and the economy. Prejudice based on a person's race or ethnicity is a major contributor to this problem.

Expository Thesis Statement

The purpose of an expository essay is to inform the reader about a topic by providing them with background information and supporting evidence. When writing an expository essay, your thesis statement should give a preview of the information the reader may expect to find in the body paragraphs.

Example: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) raises the risk for cardiovascular problems like stroke and high heart rate.

Compare and Contrast Thesis Statement

Comparison and contrast essays can take many different forms. Some tasks need you to look for major differences or parallels. However, in some cases, you must focus on both.

Example: Despite their apparent incompatibility, authoritarian and permissive parenting styles have one thing in common: they both encourage children to accept responsibility for their actions.

Cause and Effect Thesis Statement

Essays that focus on the causes and consequences of an event or situation are known as "cause and effect" essays. A cause-and-effect thesis statement requires that you explain why something happened.

Example: The insufficiency of social support services is a major contributor to the rise in homelessness, among other factors.

3 Thesis Statement Examples

Here are three examples of persuasive thesis statements to enhance your understanding of impactful writing. These instances illustrate how to craft strong and compelling thesis statements that anchor persuasive essays. Studying these examples will offer valuable insights into the strategies used by proficient writers to engage their readers and effectively present their arguments.

The Importance of Physical Activity for Mental Health

Regular physical activity is essential for maintaining good mental health, as it helps to reduce stress, improve mood, and increase overall well-being. (Thesis Statement)

Explanation of Thesis Statement:

“The essay explains that regular physical activity is crucial for maintaining good mental health. The statement presents three reasons why physical activity is important for mental health: reducing stress, improving mood, and increasing overall well-being. The essay then goes on to explain each of these reasons in detail, supporting the thesis with evidence from scientific studies. The thesis statement summarizes the central argument of the essay, which is that physical activity is a powerful tool for promoting mental health and well-being”

Physical activity has long been associated with physical health benefits, such as reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improving cardiovascular function. However, many people are not aware of the important role that physical activity plays in maintaining good mental health. Regular physical activity is essential for mental health, as it helps to reduce stress, improve mood, and increase overall well-being.

One of the primary benefits of physical activity for mental health is its ability to reduce stress. When we engage in physical activity, our bodies release endorphins, which are hormones that help to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety. Additionally, physical activity can provide a sense of accomplishment and help to boost self-esteem, which can also help to reduce stress levels.

In addition to reducing stress, physical activity has been shown to improve mood. Studies have found that regular exercise can help to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety, and can even be as effective as medication in some cases. Exercise has also been shown to improve cognitive function and increase energy levels, which can help to improve mood and overall well-being.

Finally, physical activity is important for overall well-being. When we engage in regular exercise, we are more likely to maintain a healthy weight, which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases and improve physical health. Additionally, physical activity can help to improve sleep quality, which is essential for good mental health. By improving physical health and well-being, physical activity can also have a positive impact on mental health.

In conclusion, regular physical activity is essential for maintaining good mental health. By reducing stress, improving mood, and increasing overall well-being, physical activity can help to improve mental health and prevent the development of mental health conditions. Therefore, individuals need to engage in regular physical activity as part of their overall mental health and wellness plan.

The Benefits of Traveling Abroad

Traveling abroad offers numerous benefits, including cultural immersion, personal growth, and new experiences. (Thesis Statement)

“This essay explains the many advantages of traveling abroad, highlighting how it allows individuals to immerse themselves in different cultures, gain new experiences, and develop valuable skills. The thesis statement asserts that traveling abroad is a valuable opportunity for personal growth and enrichment”.

Traveling abroad is an exciting and enriching experience that provides individuals with a unique opportunity to explore new cultures, gain new perspectives, and develop valuable skills. While it can be challenging to step out of one's comfort zone and navigate unfamiliar environments, the benefits of traveling abroad are well worth the effort.

One of the most significant benefits of traveling abroad is cultural immersion. By immersing oneself in a different culture, individuals can gain a deeper appreciation for diversity and broaden their perspectives. Exposure to different ways of life can also challenge one's assumptions and encourage personal growth. By experiencing different cultures firsthand, individuals can develop a more nuanced understanding of the world and become more tolerant and accepting of others.

In addition to cultural immersion, traveling abroad offers the chance to have new experiences. From trying new foods to exploring unfamiliar landscapes, traveling abroad can provide a sense of adventure and excitement. It can also be an opportunity to learn new skills, such as a foreign language or cultural customs. For example, taking a cooking class in Thailand or attending a tango lesson in Argentina can provide a unique and unforgettable experience that enriches one's life in ways that can't be replicated at home.

Furthermore, traveling abroad can have a positive impact on one's personal growth. It can help individuals become more independent, confident, and resilient as they navigate new environments and overcome challenges. Additionally, traveling abroad can provide opportunities for reflection and self-discovery, leading to a better understanding of one's values and goals. For example, traveling alone to a foreign country can be an empowering and transformative experience that allows individuals to push their limits and discover their strengths.

While traveling abroad can be daunting, it is important to remember that the benefits far outweigh the challenges. By stepping out of one's comfort zone and exploring new horizons, individuals can gain a richer, more fulfilling perspective on life. The memories, experiences, and skills gained from traveling abroad can last a lifetime and provide valuable insights and personal growth opportunities that are not available in one's home country.

In conclusion, traveling abroad offers numerous benefits, including cultural immersion, new experiences, and personal growth. By exploring new cultures and pushing one's limits, individuals can gain a deeper appreciation for diversity, develop new skills, and become more independent and confident. While it can be challenging, traveling abroad is a transformative and enriching experience that can provide a lifetime of memories and personal growth opportunities.

The Importance of Effective Communication in the Workplace

Effective communication is critical for success in the workplace, as it promotes collaboration, builds trust, and improves productivity. (Thesis Statement)

“This essay emphasizes the importance of effective communication in the workplace, highlighting how it enables teams to work together towards common goals, fosters collaboration and trust and improves productivity. The thesis statement asserts that effective communication is crucial for success in the workplace, and that clear and concise communication leads to better problem-solving and decision-making.”

Effective communication is essential for success in the workplace, as it enables individuals and teams to work together to achieve common goals. When communication is clear and concise, it promotes collaboration and encourages the sharing of ideas and feedback. This leads to improved problem-solving and decision-making, as well as increased efficiency and productivity.

One of the most significant benefits of effective communication is collaboration. When individuals communicate openly and honestly, it fosters a culture of transparency and accountability. This, in turn, helps to build trust and strengthen relationships between colleagues, which is essential for a healthy and productive work environment. By collaborating effectively, teams can achieve their goals more efficiently and effectively, while also fostering a sense of camaraderie and teamwork.

In addition to promoting collaboration, effective communication builds trust in the workplace. When individuals communicate openly and honestly, it fosters a culture of transparency and accountability. This, in turn, helps to build trust and strengthen relationships between colleagues, which is essential for a healthy and productive work environment. Trust is a critical component of effective teamwork and is necessary for individuals to feel comfortable sharing ideas, giving and receiving feedback, and collaborating on projects. When trust is established, individuals are more likely to be open to new ideas and approaches, and they are more likely to take calculated risks, leading to greater innovation and creativity.

Effective communication also helps to prevent misunderstandings and conflicts, as everyone is on the same page and has a clear understanding of expectations and goals. This is particularly important in today's global and diverse workplace, where communication breakdowns can occur due to differences in culture, language, or other factors. By communicating clearly and respectfully, individuals can bridge these gaps and build strong relationships with colleagues from different backgrounds.

Finally, effective communication plays a critical role in improving productivity. When individuals are clear about their roles and responsibilities and have access to the information and resources they need, they are better equipped to perform their jobs efficiently and effectively. This can lead to greater job satisfaction, higher morale, and ultimately, improved business outcomes.

In conclusion, effective communication is critical for success in the workplace, as it promotes collaboration, builds trust, and improves productivity. By prioritizing clear and respectful communication, individuals and teams can work together to achieve their goals and create a positive and productive work environment.

Final Thoughts

A strong thesis statement sets the tone for your entire essay, and having the flexibility to adjust it can save you time and effort. Even with a solid understanding of thesis statements, crafting an impactful one can still be challenging. 

But don't worry, Jenni.ai is here to assist. This AI-powered tool enables you to create engaging and effective thesis statements that feel authentically human-written. If you're seeking a standout thesis statement, give Jenni.ai a try and see the difference for yourself.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

Table of contents

how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

Meredith Sell

You can make your essay more persuasive by getting straight to the point.

In fact, that's exactly what we did here, and that's just the first tip of this guide. Throughout this guide, we share the steps needed to prove an argument and create a persuasive essay.

This AI tool helps you improve your essay > This AI tool helps you improve your essay >

persuasive essay

Key takeaways: - Proven process to make any argument persuasive - 5-step process to structure arguments - How to use AI to formulate and optimize your essay

Why is being persuasive so difficult?

"Write an essay that persuades the reader of your opinion on a topic of your choice."

You might be staring at an assignment description just like this 👆from your professor. Your computer is open to a blank document, the cursor blinking impatiently. Do I even have opinions?

The persuasive essay can be one of the most intimidating academic papers to write: not only do you need to identify a narrow topic and research it, but you also have to come up with a position on that topic that you can back up with research while simultaneously addressing different viewpoints.

That’s a big ask. And let’s be real: most opinion pieces in major news publications don’t fulfill these requirements.

The upside? By researching and writing your own opinion, you can learn how to better formulate not only an argument but the actual positions you decide to hold. 

Here, we break down exactly how to write a persuasive essay. We’ll start by taking a step that’s key for every piece of writing—defining the terms.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

A persuasive essay is exactly what it sounds like: an essay that persuades . Over the course of several paragraphs or pages, you’ll use researched facts and logic to convince the reader of your opinion on a particular topic and discredit opposing opinions.

While you’ll spend some time explaining the topic or issue in question, most of your essay will flesh out your viewpoint and the evidence that supports it.

The 5 Must-Have Steps of a Persuasive Essay

If you’re intimidated by the idea of writing an argument, use this list to break your process into manageable chunks. Tackle researching and writing one element at a time, and then revise your essay so that it flows smoothly and coherently with every component in the optimal place.

1. A topic or issue to argue

This is probably the hardest step. You need to identify a topic or issue that is narrow enough to cover in the length of your piece—and is also arguable from more than one position. Your topic must call for an opinion , and not be a simple fact .

It might be helpful to walk through this process:

  • Identify a random topic
  • Ask a question about the topic that involves a value claim or analysis to answer
  • Answer the question

That answer is your opinion.

Let’s consider some examples, from silly to serious:

Topic: Dolphins and mermaids

Question: In a mythical match, who would win: a dolphin or a mermaid?

Answer/Opinion: The mermaid would win in a match against a dolphin.

Topic: Autumn

Question: Which has a better fall: New England or Colorado?

Answer/Opinion: Fall is better in New England than Colorado.

Topic: Electric transportation options

Question: Would it be better for an urban dweller to buy an electric bike or an electric car?

Answer/Opinion: An electric bike is a better investment than an electric car.

Your turn: Walk through the three-step process described above to identify your topic and your tentative opinion. You may want to start by brainstorming a list of topics you find interesting and then going use the three-step process to find the opinion that would make the best essay topic.

2. An unequivocal thesis statement

If you walked through our three-step process above, you already have some semblance of a thesis—but don’t get attached too soon! 

A solid essay thesis is best developed through the research process. You shouldn’t land on an opinion before you know the facts. So press pause. Take a step back. And dive into your research.

You’ll want to learn:

  • The basic facts of your topic. How long does fall last in New England vs. Colorado? What trees do they have? What colors do those trees turn?
  • The facts specifically relevant to your question. Is there any science on how the varying colors of fall influence human brains and moods?
  • What experts or other noteworthy and valid sources say about the question you’re considering. Has a well-known arborist waxed eloquent on the beauty of New England falls?

As you learn the different viewpoints people have on your topic, pay attention to the strengths and weaknesses of existing arguments. Is anyone arguing the perspective you’re leaning toward? Do you find their arguments convincing? What do you find unsatisfying about the various arguments? 

Allow the research process to change your mind and/or refine your thinking on the topic. Your opinion may change entirely or become more specific based on what you learn.

Once you’ve done enough research to feel confident in your understanding of the topic and your opinion on it, craft your thesis. 

Your thesis statement should be clear and concise. It should directly state your viewpoint on the topic, as well as the basic case for your thesis.

Thesis 1: In a mythical match, the mermaid would overcome the dolphin due to one distinct advantage: her ability to breathe underwater.

Thesis 2: The full spectrum of color displayed on New England hillsides is just one reason why fall in the northeast is better than in Colorado.

Thesis 3: In addition to not adding to vehicle traffic, electric bikes are a better investment than electric cars because they’re cheaper and require less energy to accomplish the same function of getting the rider from point A to point B.

Your turn: Dive into the research process with a radar up for the arguments your sources are making about your topic. What are the most convincing cases? Should you stick with your initial opinion or change it up? Write your fleshed-out thesis statement.

3. Evidence to back up your thesis

This is a typical place for everyone from undergrads to politicians to get stuck, but the good news is, if you developed your thesis from research, you already have a good bit of evidence to make your case.

Go back through your research notes and compile a list of every …

… or other piece of information that supports your thesis. 

This info can come from research studies you found in scholarly journals, government publications, news sources, encyclopedias, or other credible sources (as long as they fit your professor’s standards).

As you put this list together, watch for any gaps or weak points. Are you missing information on how electric cars versus electric bicycles charge or how long their batteries last? Did you verify that dolphins are, in fact, mammals and can’t breathe underwater like totally-real-and-not-at-all-fake 😉mermaids can? Track down that information.

Next, organize your list. Group the entries so that similar or closely related information is together, and as you do that, start thinking through how to articulate the individual arguments to support your case. 

Depending on the length of your essay, each argument may get only a paragraph or two of space. As you think through those specific arguments, consider what order to put them in. You’ll probably want to start with the simplest argument and work up to more complicated ones so that the arguments can build on each other. 

Your turn: Organize your evidence and write a rough draft of your arguments. Play around with the order to find the most compelling way to argue your case.

4. Rebuttals to disprove opposing theses

You can’t just present the evidence to support your case and totally ignore other viewpoints. To persuade your readers, you’ll need to address any opposing ideas they may hold about your topic. 

You probably found some holes in the opposing views during your research process. Now’s your chance to expose those holes. 

Take some time (and space) to: describe the opposing views and show why those views don’t hold up. You can accomplish this using both logic and facts.

Is a perspective based on a faulty assumption or misconception of the truth? Shoot it down by providing the facts that disprove the opinion.

Is another opinion drawn from bad or unsound reasoning? Show how that argument falls apart.

Some cases may truly be only a matter of opinion, but you still need to articulate why you don’t find the opposing perspective convincing.

Yes, a dolphin might be stronger than a mermaid, but as a mammal, the dolphin must continually return to the surface for air. A mermaid can breathe both underwater and above water, which gives her a distinct advantage in this mythical battle.

While the Rocky Mountain views are stunning, their limited colors—yellow from aspen trees and green from various evergreens—leaves the autumn-lover less than thrilled. The rich reds and oranges and yellows of the New England fall are more satisfying and awe-inspiring.

But what about longer trips that go beyond the city center into the suburbs and beyond? An electric bike wouldn’t be great for those excursions. Wouldn’t an electric car be the better choice then? 

Certainly, an electric car would be better in these cases than a gas-powered car, but if most of a person’s trips are in their hyper-local area, the electric bicycle is a more environmentally friendly option for those day-to-day outings. That person could then participate in a carshare or use public transit, a ride-sharing app, or even a gas-powered car for longer trips—and still use less energy overall than if they drove an electric car for hyper-local and longer area trips.

Your turn: Organize your rebuttal research and write a draft of each one.

5. A convincing conclusion

You have your arguments and rebuttals. You’ve proven your thesis is rock-solid. Now all you have to do is sum up your overall case and give your final word on the subject. 

Don’t repeat everything you’ve already said. Instead, your conclusion should logically draw from the arguments you’ve made to show how they coherently prove your thesis. You’re pulling everything together and zooming back out with a better understanding of the what and why of your thesis. 

A dolphin may never encounter a mermaid in the wild, but if it were to happen, we know how we’d place our bets. Long hair and fish tail, for the win.

For those of us who relish 50-degree days, sharp air, and the vibrant colors of fall, New England offers a season that’s cozier, longer-lasting, and more aesthetically pleasing than “colorful” Colorado. A leaf-peeper’s paradise.

When most of your trips from day to day are within five miles, the more energy-efficient—and yes, cost-efficient—choice is undoubtedly the electric bike. So strap on your helmet, fire up your pedals, and two-wheel away to your next destination with full confidence that you made the right decision for your wallet and the environment.

3 Quick Tips for Writing a Strong Argument

Once you have a draft to work with, use these tips to refine your argument and make sure you’re not losing readers for avoidable reasons.

1. Choose your words thoughtfully.

If you want to win people over to your side, don’t write in a way that shuts your opponents down. Avoid making abrasive or offensive statements. Instead, use a measured, reasonable tone. Appeal to shared values, and let your facts and logic do the hard work of changing people’s minds.

Choose words with AI

how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

You can use AI to turn your general point into a readable argument. Then, you can paraphrase each sentence and choose between competing arguments generated by the AI, until your argument is well-articulated and concise.

2. Prioritize accuracy (and avoid fallacies).

Make sure the facts you use are actually factual. You don’t want to build your argument on false or disproven information. Use the most recent, respected research. Make sure you don’t misconstrue study findings. And when you’re building your case, avoid logical fallacies that undercut your argument.

A few common fallacies to watch out for:

  • Strawman: Misrepresenting or oversimplifying an opposing argument to make it easier to refute.
  • Appeal to ignorance: Arguing that a certain claim must be true because it hasn’t been proven false.
  • Bandwagon: Assumes that if a group of people, experts, etc., agree with a claim, it must be true.
  • Hasty generalization: Using a few examples, rather than substantial evidence, to make a sweeping claim.
  • Appeal to authority: Overly relying on opinions of people who have authority of some kind.

The strongest arguments rely on trustworthy information and sound logic.

Research and add citations with AI

how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

We recently wrote a three part piece on researching using AI, so be sure to check it out . Going through an organized process of researching and noting your sources correctly will make sure your written text is more accurate.

3. Persuasive essay structure

Persuasive essay structure

If you’re building a house, you start with the foundation and go from there. It’s the same with an argument. You want to build from the ground up: provide necessary background information, then your thesis. Then, start with the simplest part of your argument and build up in terms of complexity and the aspect of your thesis that the argument is tackling.

A consistent, internal logic will make it easier for the reader to follow your argument. Plus, you’ll avoid confusing your reader and you won’t be unnecessarily redundant.

The essay structure usually includes the following parts:

  • Intro - Hook, Background information, Thesis statement
  • Topic sentence #1 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence
  • Topic sentence #2 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Concluding sentence Topic sentence #3 , with supporting facts or stats
  • Conclusion - Thesis and main points restated, call to action, thought provoking ending

Are You Ready to Write?

Persuasive essays are a great way to hone your research, writing, and critical thinking skills. Approach this assignment well, and you’ll learn how to form opinions based on information (not just ideas) and make arguments that—if they don’t change minds—at least win readers’ respect. ‍

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How to Write a Persuasive Thesis

Last Updated: May 31, 2023 References

wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To create this article, 32 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. There are 16 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 99,600 times.

A thesis is a type of writing that involves an in-depth analysis of a research topic. Unlike a regular essay, a thesis is usually quite long, in-depth, and based on extensive research. [1] X Research source A persuasive thesis uses sound research, analysis, and commentary in order to encourage a reader to agree with the author's overarching argument. Many schools, colleges, and universities require students to submit a thesis as part of their degree requirements.

Beginning the Writing Process

Step 1 Understand the thesis assignment.

  • How long must my thesis be?
  • Are there any specific topics I must address, or must I come up with my own topic?
  • How many sources must I cite?
  • Do I have to submit any pre-writing assignments (drafts, outlines, bibliographies, proposals, etc.)?

Step 2 Narrow down a research topic.

  • Is this topic something I am passionate about? Remember that you might spend several weeks or even months working with this topic, so it should hold your interest.
  • Is this topic relevant to the assignment? Always adhere to the restrictions of the assignment.
  • Is this topic broad enough to provide me with flexibility, but narrow enough that I can contribute meaningfully to it? For example, "The U.S. Civil War" is probably too broad of a topic to be manageable. On the other hand, "The type of thread used to sew Civil War regimental flags" might skew too far in the other direction by being too narrow to sustain a lengthy thesis assignment. "The design of Civil War regimental flags" is a topic that is just right: broad enough to provide you with plenty of research and flexibility, but narrow enough that you will not be overwhelmed.

Step 3 Discuss your tentative topic with your instructor.

  • Some thesis assignments even require that you submit a thesis proposal or annotated bibliography before you are permitted to begin writing. [8] X Research source If these are required of you, be sure you follow the appropriate assignment guidelines.

Step 4 Read a few initial research materials.

  • For example, "Voter ID laws discourage minority voters more than white voters" is a descriptive thesis. "Voter ID laws should be abolished in order to maintain a democratic form of government" is a prescriptive thesis.

Step 6 Write down a tentative thesis statement.

  • Clear [11] X Research source
  • Specific [12] X Research source
  • Arguable [13] X Research source
  • Rooted in facts, not pure opinions [14] X Research source (though sometimes expert opinion can count as evidence)
  • Non-judgmental and non-confrontational [15] X Research source
  • Relevant to the assignment
  • Significant

Step 7 Make a timeline.

Compiling Your Research

Step 1 Determine the kind of research required of your thesis.

  • If your research involves human subjects, remember that you are usually required to get approval from an Institutional Review Board. [18] X Trustworthy Source US Department of Health and Human Services Federal department responsible for improving the health and well-being of Americans Go to source This can take extra time, so be sure that you submit your project proposal early.

Step 2 Examine relevant commentary about your topic.

  • The results of related scientific experiments
  • The results of related social science surveys
  • Theoretical analysis of your topic
  • Historical analysis of your topic

Step 3 Use searchable databases to acquire sources.

  • Sometimes these databases will provide you with direct access to an online copy of a book or article. At other times it will provide you with a title that you must track down yourself at another library.
  • If your university does not subscribe to an online database related to your field of study, you can use open-access searches such as Google Scholar. You might also visit your local public library to see if they have access to online databases that can help you.

Step 4 Use a research library to acquire sources.

  • Remember to scan the shelves that surround the book titles you acquired during your search. Many libraries shelve according to subject, and there might be relevant materials in the immediate vicinity of the books you identified.
  • Research libraries often employ research librarians who can help you identify additional sources and databases to aid you in your search. Talk to the library staff to see if someone might be willing to assist you with your research project. [21] X Research source

Step 5 Ensure the accuracy of your research and sources.

  • As you write, you can use the outline as a guide to keep you focused and relevant. However, many people find that they must depart somewhat from the outline as they write: this is a normal part of the writing process. [26] X Research source
  • Many long theses are arranged in several, related sections. Consider what sections and section headers you might use to organize your thesis.

Drafting Your Introduction

Step 1 Identify the reader.

Drafting Your Body Paragraphs

Step 1 Refer to your outline frequently.

  • As you write, you might find that you have to revise your outline or change your focus slightly. This is perfectly fine: just remember to keep your thesis statement in mind at all times as you write.

Step 2 Make sure each body paragraph is relevant to the thesis.

  • Topic sentences are a great way to ensure that your body paragraphs remain focused. Ask yourself whether the topic sentence of each paragraph supports your thesis statement.

Step 3 Use transition sentences between paragraphs.

Drafting Your Conclusion

Step 1 Consider whether your evidence supports your thesis statement.

Revising Your Thesis

Step 1 Give yourself some space from your essay.

  • Changing your thesis statement to reflect the evidence more accurately
  • Finding new sources of evidence to help prove your case
  • Adding more of your own analysis to the evidence you have already provided
  • Dealing more thoroughly with potential counterarguments

Step 5 Consider whether each sentence makes sense.

  • It can sometimes help to change your font or use a different color of ink when you proofread. Your eyes are more likely to catch an error when your essay is presented in a different format from when you originally typed it.

Step 10 Make sure all sources are properly cited.

  • Sometimes those who edit your paper will provide you with helpful notes. At other times, it might be best for you to follow your own instincts: do not make changes just because a fellow student tells you to. Think carefully about the suggestions, and make corrections as you see fit.
  • Sometimes you are required to submit a draft of your thesis to an advisor or external reader, who will provide you with comments to help you revise the thesis. [48] X Research source

Expert Q&A

  • If you get stuck, try writing in a new environment--preferably one that provides some background noises, such as a cafe. That can help your concentration and ease your anxiety. [49] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Write in an environment with lots of natural light to help you stay focused. [50] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Take frequent breaks. [51] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Never cheat or plagiarize. You could jeopardize your grade in the class or your entire academic career. Be sure that your thesis is entirely your own work, and that every source is accurately cited. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Do not fabricate data. It is much better to analyze authentic data than falsified data. Perhaps your thesis won't be as dramatic, but at least it will be accurate. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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Ask for Feedback

  • ↑ https://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/dept/history/requirements/senior-essay-thesis/
  • ↑ http://www.pointpark.edu/Academics/AcademicResources/Library/HowToWriteAResearchPaper/HowToWriteAResearchPaperStep1
  • ↑ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/587/01/
  • ↑ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/658/03/
  • ↑ http://faculty.georgetown.edu/kingch/How_to_Write_a_Research_Paper.htm
  • ↑ https://www.counseling.org/news/aca-blogs/aca-member-blogs/aca-member-blogs/2011/09/07/what-is-the-difference-between-a-dissertation-and-a-thesis-and-what-exactly-are-these-things-anyway-
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/developing-thesis
  • ↑ http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/assurances/irb/
  • ↑ https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/PlanResearchPaper.html#discovering
  • ↑ https://www.esc.edu/online-writing-center/resources/research/research-paper-steps/finding-sources/
  • ↑ http://ctl.yale.edu/writing/using-sources/scholarly-vs-popular-sources
  • ↑ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/9/
  • ↑ http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml
  • ↑ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/
  • ↑ http://www.wgu.edu/blogpost/improve-online-study-environment
  • ↑ https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/673/01/

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Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

Persuasive Speech thesis statement examples

Crafting a persuasive speech hinges on a compelling thesis statement – the linchpin that anchors your argument and guides your audience. The potency of your speech is encapsulated in this singular sentence, making it essential to perfect. Below, we delve into the anatomy of persuasive speech thesis statements, offering examples to inspire, guidelines to streamline the writing process, and pro tips to ensure your message resonates powerfully. Ready to persuade and captivate? Dive in.

What is a Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement? – Definition

A persuasive speech thesis statement is a concise declaration that clearly expresses the main argument or stance of your speech. Unlike an informative speech thesis statement which simply informs, a persuasive speech thesis aims to convince the audience to adopt a particular viewpoint or take a certain action. It serves as the foundation of your argument, providing a roadmap for your listeners and guiding the content of your speech.

What is a good thesis statement Example for a persuasive speech?

A good thesis statement for a persuasive speech should be clear, concise, arguable, and specific. Here’s an example:

Topic: Reducing meat consumption for environmental purposes.

Thesis Statement: “Reducing our meat consumption by half can significantly decrease our carbon footprint, lessen water usage, and help in preserving essential ecosystems, making it not just a dietary choice but a responsibility for the environment.”

This thesis statement makes a clear argument, states why the audience should care, and is backed by several points that can be elaborated upon during the speech.

100 Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples

  • Mandatory vaccinations are crucial for public health.
  • Vegetarianism can significantly reduce global environmental damage.
  • Schools should abolish standardized tests.
  • Solar energy is the future of global power.
  • Animal testing for cosmetics should be banned worldwide.
  • Online education can be more effective than traditional classroom settings.
  • Ban on single-use plastics is essential for marine conservation.
  • Euthanasia should be legalized under specific circumstances.
  • Governments should regulate social media to combat fake news.
  • Higher education should be free for all citizens.
  • Workplace dress codes are outdated and unnecessary.
  • Young adults should be mandated to take a gap year before college.
  • Juvenile offenders should never be treated as adults in the legal system.
  • Artificial intelligence poses more risks than benefits.
  • GMOs are safe and beneficial for global food security.
  • Children under 16 shouldn’t have access to smartphones.
  • Censorship in media does more harm than good.
  • Parents should be held accountable for their children’s cyberbullying actions.
  • Organic farming is essential for future food sustainability.
  • Space exploration is a waste of money that could be better spent on Earth’s problems.
  • Pro athletes deserve their high salaries due to their unique skills and market demand.
  • The death penalty is an outdated form of punishment.
  • Video games don’t lead to violent behavior in youths.
  • Mandatory voting would strengthen democracies.
  • Physical education in schools is essential for youth health.
  • Corporal punishment is detrimental to children’s well-being.
  • Taxing sugary drinks can decrease obesity rates.
  • All countries should adopt a universal basic income.
  • Modern zoos are ethical and beneficial for wildlife conservation.
  • Children’s exposure to screen time should be limited for cognitive development.
  • Countries should prioritize refugees over other immigrants.
  • Binge-watching TV shows can lead to psychological issues.
  • Public transport should be free to reduce traffic congestion.
  • Companies should be taxed more for carbon emissions.
  • Homeschooling can provide a more personalized education than traditional schools.
  • Medical marijuana should be legalized worldwide.
  • Advertising to children should be strictly regulated.
  • Fast fashion is detrimental to both the environment and society.
  • Child actors are often exploited and laws should protect them more rigorously.
  • Cybersecurity education should be a mandatory part of school curriculums.
  • Celebrity endorsements in politics do more harm than good.
  • Gender-neutral bathrooms promote inclusivity and should be standardized.
  • Self-driving cars are the solution to urban traffic woes.
  • The gig economy undermines workers’ rights.
  • Print books are superior to e-books for cognitive absorption.
  • Intermittent fasting has more benefits than traditional dieting.
  • Capitalism needs significant reforms to address modern challenges.
  • Professional networks are more beneficial than academic degrees in today’s job market.
  • Pets should be adopted from shelters instead of being purchased from breeders.
  • Drone deliveries are the future of e-commerce.
  • Modern architecture should prioritize sustainability over aesthetics.
  • Mental health days should be a standard employment benefit.
  • Religious institutions should pay taxes.
  • Athletes caught doping should face lifetime bans.
  • All public places should offer free Wi-Fi.
  • Parenting classes should be mandatory for expectant parents.
  • Soft skills are more important than hard skills in today’s workforce.
  • College athletes should be paid for their efforts.
  • Digital currency will replace traditional money.
  • Forest conservation is more important than urban expansion.
  • Remote work improves employee productivity and well-being.
  • Traditional college is becoming obsolete.
  • Public figures have a right to personal privacy.
  • Extreme adventure sports should have stricter regulations.
  • Recycling should be legally mandatory for households.
  • Local tourism is more sustainable than international travel.
  • Artificial sweeteners do more harm than natural sugars.
  • Digital detoxes are essential for mental health.
  • Nuclear energy is a necessary alternative in the climate change battle.
  • Fossil fuels need to be phased out within the next decade.
  • The pay gap is a pervasive issue that needs addressing.
  • Mandatory military service strengthens nations.
  • Multilingual education from a young age has cognitive and cultural benefits.
  • Cultural appropriation in fashion and art should be discouraged.
  • Childhood vaccination should not be optional.
  • Public speaking skills should be a mandatory part of the school curriculum.
  • Reality TV promotes negative stereotypes and should be reformed.
  • The 4-day workweek improves overall quality of life.
  • Bottled water is an environmental and economic disaster.
  • Governments should fund scientific research over military endeavors.
  • Telemedicine is as effective as in-person consultations.
  • The arts are just as important as sciences in education.
  • Elitism in Ivy League schools undermines the education system.
  • Human cloning has more ethical concerns than benefits.
  • Paternity leave should be equal to maternity leave.
  • Junk food advertising should be banned during children’s television programming.
  • Sustainable living should be a core part of school education.
  • Immigration policies should be more compassionate.
  • Philanthropy by billionaires isn’t a solution to systemic societal issues.
  • Traditional media is losing its credibility.
  • Fast food chains should be accountable for the obesity epidemic.
  • Urban gardens are essential for community well-being.
  • Virtual reality can revolutionize education.
  • Tabloid journalism threatens democratic processes.
  • Every city should have green rooftops.
  • Adventure travel is more than a trend; it’s a learning experience.
  • Plastics in cosmetics harm both the environment and consumers.
  • Youth activism is reshaping global politics.
  • The universal right to internet access should be a fundamental human right.
  • The rise of influencer culture negatively impacts societal values.

Remember, these are broad topics and may need to be adjusted to fit specific audiences or contexts. They aim to serve as inspiration and a starting point for your persuasive speeches.

Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples for College

Crafting the right thesis for a college-based persuasive speech can mold opinions, drive actions, and shape futures. Here’s a set of examples aiming at various issues relevant to the college experience.

  • Implementing mental health services in colleges is crucial to support student well-being.
  • Every college should offer free online course alternatives to reduce student costs.
  • Limiting textbook prices will make higher education more accessible.
  • Extracurricular activities are just as vital as academics in shaping a student’s character.
  • Campus security measures should be increased to ensure student safety.
  • Colleges should foster an environment that promotes free speech and open dialogue.
  • The fraternity and sorority system requires an overhaul to combat systemic issues.
  • Online courses can be more tailored and efficient than traditional classroom lectures.
  • Mandatory internships should be integrated into every college curriculum.
  • College tuition fees should be proportional to post-graduate income levels.

Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples on Pollution

Pollution, in its many forms, threatens our health, environment, and future. These thesis statements shed light on the pressing need for action and awareness in tackling this universal concern.

  • Air pollution’s long-term health impacts make it a silent global crisis.
  • Ocean plastic pollution threatens not only marine life but human survival.
  • Urbanization without proper waste management systems exacerbates land pollution.
  • Implementing stricter emission standards can significantly reduce vehicular pollution.
  • Industrial water pollution is the leading cause of freshwater habitat loss.
  • Noise pollution in urban areas has unrecognized psychological implications.
  • Electronic waste is the new environmental crisis of the digital age.
  • Encouraging sustainable agriculture can mitigate soil pollution.
  • Light pollution affects human circadian rhythms and needs to be addressed.
  • The cosmetic industry must be held accountable for microplastic pollution.

Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples for Introduction

Setting the right tone at the start of your speech is crucial. An impactful thesis statement in your introduction can capture attention and shape the direction of your persuasive message.

  • Today’s consumerist society threatens the planet’s finite resources.
  • Advancements in technology are eroding genuine human connections.
  • Our dietary choices have profound implications for our health and environment.
  • Childhood education shapes a nation’s future more than any policy.
  • The rise of digital currencies can revolutionize the global financial system.
  • The media landscape shapes public perception more than factual events.
  • Combating climate change is not a choice but a necessity.
  • The fashion industry’s practices are at odds with ethical consumerism.
  • Urban planning and green spaces directly impact societal well-being.
  • The future of transportation lies in sustainable energy sources.

Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples for Conclusion

A powerful ending requires a conclusive thesis statement, reinforcing your argument and ensuring your message resonates after the speech ends.

  • Confronting gender biases isn’t a niche issue but central to societal progress.
  • Without collective action, endangered species face an irreversible fate.
  • Privacy in the digital age is not a luxury, but a fundamental right.
  • Without conscious effort, traditional cultures risk fading into oblivion.
  • Sustainable living isn’t a trend but the only way forward.
  • Local businesses are the backbone of a thriving community.
  • Without reforms, the healthcare system will collapse under its weight.
  • The arts, often underfunded, are essential for holistic human development.
  • Youth engagement in politics can reshape outdated policies.
  • Technology, without ethical boundaries, poses a threat to human autonomy.

How do you start a thesis statement for a persuasive speech?

Starting a thesis statement for a persuasive speech is pivotal in setting the tone and direction for the rest of the speech. Here’s how to begin crafting one:

  • Identify Your Topic : Understand the topic you’ll be addressing. This might seem obvious, but having a clear topic in mind ensures your thesis remains focused.
  • Understand Your Audience : Tailor your thesis statement to appeal to the audience’s values, beliefs, and interests.
  • State Your Position Clearly : A persuasive speech thesis statement must make a claim or express an opinion that you will support and develop throughout the speech.
  • Make It Arguable : Ensure your thesis presents a viewpoint someone might challenge. It should not be a plain statement of fact.
  • Keep It Concise : An effective thesis is concise and direct, avoiding vague words or overly complex sentence structures.
  • Start with a Strong Word : Words like “must,” “should,” “ought to,” can make your thesis more forceful.

Example : Instead of saying “Exercise is good for health,” you might say, “Regular exercise is essential for maintaining a healthy body and mind.

How do you write a thesis statement for a persuasive essay? – Step by Step Guide

Writing a compelling thesis statement for a persuasive essay is crucial, as it sets the tone and direction for the rest of your essay. Here’s a step-by-step guide to help you craft an effective thesis statement:

1. Understand the Essay Prompt: Before crafting your thesis, ensure you thoroughly understand the essay prompt or question. This provides clarity on what you’re being asked to argue or address.

2. Choose a Specific Topic: Narrow down a broad subject to a specific topic that is suitable for the essay’s length. The more specific you are, the more concise and to the point your argument will be.

3. Take a Clear Stance: A persuasive essay requires a clear stance on the topic. Decide what your position is after analyzing all angles of the topic.

4. Conduct Preliminary Research: Before finalizing your thesis, do some preliminary research to ensure ample evidence and examples are available to support your stance. This will also help you gauge the strength of your argument.

5. Draft a Preliminary Thesis Statement: Begin by drafting a broad statement, which you’ll refine in subsequent steps.

6. Be Specific: General statements lack punch. Instead of saying, “Air pollution is bad,” you could say, “Air pollution from vehicular emissions has detrimental health effects and contributes significantly to global warming.”

7. Ensure Your Thesis is Arguable: A good persuasive essay thesis should be debatable. It’s essential that your thesis presents an opinion or claim that others could dispute.

8. Revise and Refine: After drafting, take a step back and review your thesis. Can it be more specific? Stronger? More concise? Does it truly encapsulate the main point of your essay? Adjust as necessary.

9. Seek Feedback: It’s beneficial to get feedback from peers or instructors about your thesis statement. They might offer a perspective or critique that you hadn’t considered.

10. Position Your Thesis: Traditionally, a thesis statement is placed near the end of the introduction. This helps your reader understand the argument you’ll be making in your essay.

Example: If writing about the influence of media on young minds, a potential thesis might be: “The omnipresence of media, especially social media, has a profound impact on adolescents, influencing their mental health, body image, and perceptions of reality, necessitating strict regulatory measures.

Tips for Writing a Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement

  • Be Clear and Direct : Avoid ambiguity. Your audience should immediately understand your stance.
  • Stay Focused : Your thesis should address one main idea or argument. Avoid trying to tackle too many issues at once.
  • Back It Up : While the thesis itself is a statement, always ensure you have evidence to support your claim in the body of your speech.
  • Avoid Neutral Language : Use strong, definitive language to convey your position.
  • Test Your Thesis : Before finalizing, ask yourself if someone could oppose your thesis. If the answer is no, it might not be argumentative enough.
  • Position It Properly : Typically, the thesis statement should be among the first things your audience hears, so they understand the context and direction of your speech.
  • Stay Authentic : While it’s essential to be persuasive, ensure your thesis aligns with your beliefs and knowledge. Authenticity can make your argument more convincing.

In summary, crafting a strong thesis statement for a persuasive speech or essay provides a clear direction for your argument, engages your audience, and makes your message memorable. Ensure it’s concise, specific, and backed by evidence.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay

How to Write a Persuasive Essay Video

Everyone has disagreements – whether it’s “who is the best performer of all time” or “what is the tastiest flavor of ice cream”, someone is going to have an opinion that might differ from yours. That doesn’t stop us from trying to convince each other of our perspective. This is where persuasive essays come into play. Persuasive writing is used to sway our readers to a certain viewpoint or opinion of the writer. How is that done? Today, well go over the purpose of persuasive writing and how to create an effective persuasive piece. Let’s get started!

Persuasive essays, also known as argumentative essays, are texts that are meant to convince the reader of something. There are other things besides essays that can be persuasive, such as speeches and social media posts. From politics to music to arguing why purple is the best color ever – anything can be made into a persuasive text.

But, the focus of this video is persuasive essays. When writing a persuasive essay, there is a structure you can follow to help make your argument clear and effective.

The essay is typically made up of 3 main sections: the introduction , the body , and the conclusion. To write an effective persuasive essay, each section should contain specific points you want to discuss.

Crafting Effective Introductions

The introduction paragraph of your essay should always introduce the topic you will be discussing. A good introduction paragraph will also have a hook, which is a sentence that grabs your readers attention. Once you have your hook, you will state your thesis. A thesis is the main point or argument you want to prove in your essay. Every persuasive essay must have a thesis. Lastly, you should always end each section of your essay with a concluding sentence. This is a sentence that wraps up the end of a paragraph and helps transition into the next paragraph.

Let’s look at an example of an introduction paragraph of a persuasive essay.

Long ago, ancient Egyptians worshiped cats. They believed they were godly creatures. Today, cats are still very beloved, but as household pets. Some cats aren’t so lucky; there are many cats who have yet to find their forever home. Cats are amazing animals that you should consider adopting because they are very intelligent, have an urgent need to be placed in a home, and make great companions. These are just a few reasons I’ll discuss as to why cats should be protected.

This introduction paragraph had a hook, it grabbed our attention by talking about ancient cats, and related it to cats today.

We see there is a thesis, the writer believes we need to adopt homeless cats, ideally from shelters, and gives three reasons why.

Lastly, they concluded the introduction paragraph by saying they would give more details about their reasons.

Building a Persuasive Body

Next comes the body paragraphs. The body of a persuasive essay holds all the main points you as the writer want to argue. It’s best to separate your points by paragraphs; so, if you have three main arguments, you should have at least three body paragraphs explaining them in detail. When you argue your points in the paragraph, you must make sure to explain why these reasons support your thesis. Let’s look at an example.

Cats are very smart animals. Despite what many people think, cats do in fact know their names and will react when you call out to them. They are also great at solving problems. Cats can easily get bored, when that happens, they may act mischievous. That’s why cats have puzzle toys to stimulate their curious minds. Such a smart animal should be able to have a safe home to live and play in peace.

Secondly, cats that end up in shelters don’t always find good homes. Pet shops are popular places to get cats as pets. When you get a cat from a pet shop, it will live there until it finds a good home. In shelters however, they can become packed with cats who haven’t found a home. Unfortunately, some shelters resort to euthanizing the animals when they run out space for new ones. For people who are interested in helping a cat find a home, why not consider getting one from a shelter instead?

Lastly, despite their bad reputation, cats are very friendly. Cats of all ages are able to cuddle with their owner and other pets. Some cats, just like people, need time to get used to you, but once they do, you’ll find you have a great couch-surfing buddy that keeps you company. Cats are also low maintenance pets, and are cleaner than most roommates. Just another reason to consider bringing a cat to your home.

We can see here that the author addressed the 3 main reasons that support the thesis with 3 body paragraphs. Each paragraph began with a transition word or hook, then it went into detail to support the reason, and lastly, it ended the paragraph with a concluding sentence.

Concluding with Impact

The conclusion of a persuasive essay is a summary of all the points mentioned earlier that wraps up the essay and often includes a catchy ending to drive the point home.

Whether you have been thinking of adopting for a long time or just considered it, cats everywhere are in need of a home. What better way to help an intelligent animal in need and make a new friend than to adopt a shelter cat!

As we can see, conclusion paragraphs don’t need to be super long. As long as they summarize the overall thesis and arguments of the essay, it is an effective closing to a persuasive essay.

As you’re writing the essay, there are a few tips and tricks to keep in mind to make sure your persuasion is more effective:

Repetition – Don’t say the same thing so many times that you start to sound redundant, but find ways to bring back your main argument throughout the essay. Your readers and listeners will remember your argument better if you repeat and emphasize it throughout the piece.

Real-world examples – Whether you are using data, emotions, or credibility to drive your point home, you should try to always use real-world examples to further persuade your readers.

Call to action – A good thesis in a persuasive essay is a statement that asks the reader to do something. Think hard about what you want to convince people of and narrow that action into one clear sentence. The rest of your essay should revolve around that.

Okay, let’s quickly review everything we talked about to wrap up.

The main purpose of a persuasive essay is to persuade the reader to a certain viewpoint or opinion of the writer. The essay will have an introduction paragraph that introduces the main argument, multiple body paragraphs that discuss sub-arguments that support the main argument, and a conclusion that wraps things up. And finally, if you want to make your persuasion more effective, remember to repeat your main argument throughout the paper, try to use real-world examples to support your points, and make your thesis a call to action.

That’s all for this review! Thanks for watching, and happy studying!

  • “Persuasive Essay Definition and Writing Tips.” n.d.

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Do you need to write a persuasive essay but aren’t sure what topic to focus on? Were you thrilled when your teacher said you could write about whatever you wanted but are now overwhelmed by the possibilities? We’re here to help!

Read on for a list of 113 top-notch persuasive essay topics, organized into ten categories. To help get you started, we also discuss what a persuasive essay is, how to choose a great topic, and what tips to keep in mind as you write your persuasive essay.

What Is a Persuasive Essay?

In a persuasive essay, you attempt to convince readers to agree with your point of view on an argument. For example, an essay analyzing changes in Italian art during the Renaissance wouldn’t be a persuasive essay, because there’s no argument, but an essay where you argue that Italian art reached its peak during the Renaissance would be a persuasive essay because you’re trying to get your audience to agree with your viewpoint.

Persuasive and argumentative essays both try to convince readers to agree with the author, but the two essay types have key differences. Argumentative essays show a more balanced view of the issue and discuss both sides. Persuasive essays focus more heavily on the side the author agrees with. They also often include more of the author’s opinion than argumentative essays, which tend to use only facts and data to support their argument.

All persuasive essays have the following:

  • Introduction: Introduces the topic, explains why it’s important, and ends with the thesis.
  • Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is.
  • Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do? Typically each main point will have its own body paragraph.
  • Evidence supporting your argument: Facts or examples to back up your main points. Even though your opinion is allowed in persuasive essays more than most other essays, having concrete examples will make a stronger argument than relying on your opinion alone.
  • Conclusion: Restatement of thesis, summary of main points, and a recap of why the issue is important.

What Makes a Good Persuasive Essay Topic?

Theoretically, you could write a persuasive essay about any subject under the sun, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you should. Certain topics are easier to write a strong persuasive essay on, and below are tips to follow when deciding what you should write about.

It’s a Topic You Care About

Obviously, it’s possible to write an essay about a topic you find completely boring. You’ve probably done it! However, if possible, it’s always better to choose a topic that you care about and are interested in. When this is the case, you’ll find doing the research more enjoyable, writing the essay easier, and your writing will likely be better because you’ll be more passionate about and informed on the topic.

You Have Enough Evidence to Support Your Argument

Just being passionate about a subject isn’t enough to make it a good persuasive essay topic, though. You need to make sure your argument is complex enough to have at least two potential sides to root for, and you need to be able to back up your side with evidence and examples. Even though persuasive essays allow your opinion to feature more than many other essays, you still need concrete evidence to back up your claims, or you’ll end up with a weak essay.

For example, you may passionately believe that mint chocolate chip ice cream is the best ice cream flavor (I agree!), but could you really write an entire essay on this? What would be your reasons for believing mint chocolate chip is the best (besides the fact that it’s delicious)? How would you support your belief? Have enough studies been done on preferred ice cream flavors to support an entire essay? When choosing a persuasive essay idea, you want to find the right balance between something you care about (so you can write well on it) and something the rest of the world cares about (so you can reference evidence to strengthen your position).

It’s a Manageable Topic

Bigger isn’t always better, especially with essay topics. While it may seem like a great idea to choose a huge, complex topic to write about, you’ll likely struggle to sift through all the information and different sides of the issue and winnow them down to one streamlined essay. For example, choosing to write an essay about how WWII impacted American life more than WWI wouldn’t be a great idea because you’d need to analyze all the impacts of both the wars in numerous areas of American life. It’d be a huge undertaking. A better idea would be to choose one impact on American life the wars had (such as changes in female employment) and focus on that. Doing so will make researching and writing your persuasive essay much more feasible.

feature_argumentativeessay-1

List of 113 Good Persuasive Essay Topics

Below are over 100 persuasive essay ideas, organized into ten categories. When you find an idea that piques your interest, you’ll choose one side of it to argue for in your essay. For example, if you choose the topic, “should fracking be legal?” you’d decide whether you believe fracking should be legal or illegal, then you’d write an essay arguing all the reasons why your audience should agree with you.

Arts/Culture

  • Should students be required to learn an instrument in school?
  • Did the end of Game of Thrones fit with the rest of the series?
  • Can music be an effective way to treat mental illness?
  • With e-readers so popular, have libraries become obsolete?
  • Are the Harry Potter books more popular than they deserve to be?
  • Should music with offensive language come with a warning label?
  • What’s the best way for museums to get more people to visit?
  • Should students be able to substitute an art or music class for a PE class in school?
  • Are the Kardashians good or bad role models for young people?
  • Should people in higher income brackets pay more taxes?
  • Should all high school students be required to take a class on financial literacy?
  • Is it possible to achieve the American dream, or is it only a myth?
  • Is it better to spend a summer as an unpaid intern at a prestigious company or as a paid worker at a local store/restaurant?
  • Should the United States impose more or fewer tariffs?
  • Should college graduates have their student loans forgiven?
  • Should restaurants eliminate tipping and raise staff wages instead?
  • Should students learn cursive writing in school?
  • Which is more important: PE class or music class?
  • Is it better to have year-round school with shorter breaks throughout the year?
  • Should class rank be abolished in schools?
  • Should students be taught sex education in school?
  • Should students be able to attend public universities for free?
  • What’s the most effective way to change the behavior of school bullies?
  • Are the SAT and ACT accurate ways to measure intelligence?
  • Should students be able to learn sign language instead of a foreign language?
  • Do the benefits of Greek life at colleges outweigh the negatives?
  • Does doing homework actually help students learn more?
  • Why do students in many other countries score higher than American students on math exams?
  • Should parents/teachers be able to ban certain books from schools?
  • What’s the best way to reduce cheating in school?
  • Should colleges take a student’s race into account when making admissions decisions?
  • Should there be limits to free speech?
  • Should students be required to perform community service to graduate high school?
  • Should convicted felons who have completed their sentence be allowed to vote?
  • Should gun ownership be more tightly regulated?
  • Should recycling be made mandatory?
  • Should employers be required to offer paid leave to new parents?
  • Are there any circumstances where torture should be allowed?
  • Should children under the age of 18 be able to get plastic surgery for cosmetic reasons?
  • Should white supremacy groups be allowed to hold rallies in public places?
  • Does making abortion illegal make women more or less safe?
  • Does foreign aid actually help developing countries?
  • Are there times a person’s freedom of speech should be curtailed?
  • Should people over a certain age not be allowed to adopt children?

Government/Politics

  • Should the minimum voting age be raised/lowered/kept the same?
  • Should Puerto Rico be granted statehood?
  • Should the United States build a border wall with Mexico?
  • Who should be the next person printed on American banknotes?
  • Should the United States’ military budget be reduced?
  • Did China’s one child policy have overall positive or negative impacts on the country?
  • Should DREAMers be granted US citizenship?
  • Is national security more important than individual privacy?
  • What responsibility does the government have to help homeless people?
  • Should the electoral college be abolished?
  • Should the US increase or decrease the number of refugees it allows in each year?
  • Should privately-run prisons be abolished?
  • Who was the most/least effective US president?
  • Will Brexit end up helping or harming the UK?

body-sparkler-us-flag

  • What’s the best way to reduce the spread of Ebola?
  • Is the Keto diet a safe and effective way to lose weight?
  • Should the FDA regulate vitamins and supplements more strictly?
  • Should public schools require all students who attend to be vaccinated?
  • Is eating genetically modified food safe?
  • What’s the best way to make health insurance more affordable?
  • What’s the best way to lower the teen pregnancy rate?
  • Should recreational marijuana be legalized nationwide?
  • Should birth control pills be available without a prescription?
  • Should pregnant women be forbidden from buying cigarettes and alcohol?
  • Why has anxiety increased in adolescents?
  • Are low-carb or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • What caused the destruction of the USS Maine?
  • Was King Arthur a mythical legend or actual Dark Ages king?
  • Was the US justified in dropping atomic bombs during WWII?
  • What was the primary cause of the Rwandan genocide?
  • What happened to the settlers of the Roanoke colony?
  • Was disagreement over slavery the primary cause of the US Civil War?
  • What has caused the numerous disappearances in the Bermuda triangle?
  • Should nuclear power be banned?
  • Is scientific testing on animals necessary?
  • Do zoos help or harm animals?
  • Should scientists be allowed to clone humans?
  • Should animals in circuses be banned?
  • Should fracking be legal?
  • Should people be allowed to keep exotic animals as pets?
  • What’s the best way to reduce illegal poaching in Africa?
  • What is the best way to reduce the impact of global warming?
  • Should euthanasia be legalized?
  • Is there legitimate evidence of extraterrestrial life?
  • Should people be banned from owning aggressive dog breeds?
  • Should the United States devote more money towards space exploration?
  • Should the government subsidize renewable forms of energy?
  • Is solar energy worth the cost?
  • Should stem cells be used in medicine?
  • Is it right for the US to leave the Paris Climate Agreement?
  • Should athletes who fail a drug test receive a lifetime ban from the sport?
  • Should college athletes receive a salary?
  • Should the NFL do more to prevent concussions in players?
  • Do PE classes help students stay in shape?
  • Should horse racing be banned?
  • Should cheerleading be considered a sport?
  • Should children younger than 18 be allowed to play tackle football?
  • Are the costs of hosting an Olympic Games worth it?
  • Can online schools be as effective as traditional schools?
  • Do violent video games encourage players to be violent in real life?
  • Should facial recognition technology be banned?
  • Does excessive social media use lead to depression/anxiety?
  • Has the rise of translation technology made knowing multiple languages obsolete?
  • Was Steve Jobs a visionary or just a great marketer?
  • Should social media be banned for children younger than a certain age?
  • Which 21st-century invention has had the largest impact on society?
  • Are ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft good or bad for society?
  • Should Facebook have done more to protect the privacy of its users?
  • Will technology end up increasing or decreasing inequality worldwide?

feature_information_technology

Tips for Writing a Strong Persuasive Essay

After you’ve chosen the perfect topic for your persuasive essay, your work isn’t over. Follow the three tips below to create a top-notch essay.

Do Your Research

Your argument will fall apart if you don’t fully understand the issue you’re discussing or you overlook an important piece of it. Readers won’t be convinced by someone who doesn’t know the subject, and you likely won’t persuade any of them to begin supporting your viewpoint. Before you begin writing a single word of your essay, research your topic thoroughly. Study different sources, learn about the different sides of the argument, ask anyone who’s an expert on the topic what their opinion is, etc. You might be tempted to start writing right away, but by doing your research, you’ll make the writing process much easier when the time comes.

Make Your Thesis Perfect

Your thesis is the most important sentence in your persuasive essay. Just by reading that single sentence, your audience should know exactly what topic you’ll be discussing and where you stand on the issue. You want your thesis to be crystal clear and to accurately set up the rest of your essay. Asking classmates or your teacher to look it over before you begin writing the rest of your essay can be a big help if you’re not entirely confident in your thesis.

Consider the Other Side

You’ll spend most of your essay focusing on your side of the argument since that’s what you want readers to come away believing. However, don’t think that means you can ignore other sides of the issue. In your essay, be sure to discuss the other side’s argument, as well as why you believe this view is weak or untrue. Researching all the different viewpoints and including them in your essay will increase the quality of your writing by making your essay more complete and nuanced.

Summary: Persuasive Essay Ideas

Good persuasive essay topics can be difficult to come up with, but in this guide we’ve created a list of 113 excellent essay topics for you to browse. The best persuasive essay ideas will be those that you are interested in, have enough evidence to support your argument, and aren’t too complicated to be summarized in an essay.

After you’ve chosen your essay topic, keep these three tips in mind when you begin writing:

  • Do your research
  • Make your thesis perfect
  • Consider the other side

What's Next?

Need ideas for a research paper topic as well?   Our guide to research paper topics has over 100 topics in ten categories so you can be sure to find the perfect topic for you. 

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Step-by-Step Guide + Examples

Have you ever tried to get somebody round to your way of thinking? Then you should know how daunting the task is. Still, if your persuasion is successful, the result is emotionally rewarding.

Our specialists will write a custom essay specially for you!

A persuasive essay is a type of writing that uses facts and logic to argument and substantiate such or another point of view. The purpose is to assure the reader that the author’s position is viable. In this article by Custom-writing experts, you can find a guide on persuasive writing, compelling examples, and outline structure. Continue reading and learn how to write a persuasive essay!

⚖️ Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essay

  • 🐾 Step-by-Step Writing Guide

🔗 References

An argumentative essay intends to attack the opposing point of view, discussing its drawbacks and inconsistencies. A persuasive essay describes only the writer’s opinion, explaining why it is a believable one. In other words, you are not an opponent; you are an advocate.

Argumentative vs. Persuasive Essays: in what Points Are They Similar and Different?

A persuasive essay primarily resorts to emotions and personal ideas on a deeper level of meaning, while an argumentative one invokes logic reasoning. Despite the superficial similarity of these two genres, argumentative speech presupposes intense research of the subject, while persuasive speech requires a good knowledge of the audience.

🐾 How to Write a Persuasive Essay Step by Step

These nine steps are the closest thing you will find to a shortcut for writing to persuade. With practice, you may get through these steps quickly—or even figure out new techniques in persuasive writing.

📑 Persuasive Essay Outline

Below you’ll find an example of a persuasive essay outline . Remember: papers in this genre are more flexible than argumentative essays are. You don’t need to build a perfectly logical structure here. Your goal is to persuade your reader.

Just in 1 hour! We will write you a plagiarism-free paper in hardly more than 1 hour

Note that the next section contains a sample written in accordance with this outline.

Persuasive Essay Introduction

  • Hook: start with an intriguing sentence.
  • Background: describe the context of the discussed issue and familiarize the reader with the argument.
  • Definitions: if your essay dwells upon a theoretical subject matter, be sure to explain the complicated terms.
  • Thesis statement: state the purpose of your piece of writing clearly and concisely. This is the most substantial sentence of the entire essay, so take your time formulating it.

Persuasive Essay Body

Use the following template for each paragraph.

  • Topic sentence: linking each new idea to the thesis, it introduces a paragraph. Use only one separate argument for each section, stating it in the topic sentence.
  • Evidence: substantiate the previous sentence with reliable information. If it is your personal opinion, give the reasons why you think so.
  • Analysis: build the argument, explaining how the evidence supports your thesis.

Persuasive Essay Conclusion

  • Summary: briefly list the main points of the essay in a couple of sentences.
  • Significance: connect your essay to a broader idea.
  • Future: how can your argument be developed?

⭐ Persuasive Essay Examples

In this section, there are three great persuasive essay examples. The first one is written in accordance with the outline above, will the components indicated. Two others are downloadable.

Example #1: Being a Millionaire is a Bad Thing

Introduction, paragraph #1, paragraph #2, paragraph #3, example #2: teachers or doctors.

The importance of doctors in the period of the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult to overstate. The well-being of the nation depends on how well doctors can fulfill their duties before society. The US society acknowledges the importance of doctors and healthcare, as it is ready to pay large sums of money to cure the diseases. However, during the lockdown, students and parents all around the world began to understand the importance of teachers.

Before lockdown, everyone took the presence of teachers for granted, as they were always available free of charge. In this country, it has always been the case that while doctors received praises and monetary benefits, teachers remained humble, even though they play the most important role for humanity: passing the knowledge through generations. How fair is that? The present paper claims that even in the period of the pandemic, teachers contribute more to modern society than doctors do.

Example #3: Is Online or Homeschool More Effective?

The learning process can be divided into traditional education in an educational institution and distance learning. The latter form has recently become widely popular due to the development of technology. Besides, the COVID-19 pandemic is driving the increased interest in distance learning. However, there is controversy about whether this form of training is sufficient enough. This essay aims to examine online and homeschooling in a historical and contemporary context and to confirm the thesis that such activity is at least equivalent to a standard type of education.

Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Why do managers hate the performance evaluation?  
  • Why human cloning should be prohibited.  
  • Social media have negative physical and psychological effect on teenagers.  
  • Using cell phones while driving should be completely forbidden.  
  • Why is business ethics important? 
  • Media should change its negative representation of ageing and older people.  
  • What is going on with the world?  
  • Good communication skills are critical for successful business.  
  • Why capitalism is the best economic system.  
  • Sleep is extremely important for human health and wellbeing.  
  • Face-to-face education is more effective than online education.  
  • Why video games can be beneficial for teenagers.  
  • Bullies should be expelled from school as they encroach on the school safety.  
  • Why accountancy is a great occupation and more people should consider it as a future career.  
  • The reasons art and music therapy should be included in basic health insurance.  
  • Impact of climate change on the indoor environment.  
  • Parents should vaccinate their children to prevent the spread of deadly diseases.  
  • Why celebrities should pay more attention to the values they promote.  
  • What is wrong with realism?  
  • Why water recycling should be every government’s priority.  
  • Media spreads fear and panic among people.  
  • Why e-business is very important for modern organizations.  
  • People should own guns for self-protection.  
  • The neccessity of container deposit legislation. 
  • We must save crocodiles to protect ecological balance.  
  • Why we should pay more attention to renewable energy projects.  
  • Anthropology is a critically relevant science.  
  • Why it’s important to create a new global financial order .  
  • Why biodiversity is crucial for the environment?  
  • Why process safety management is crucial for every organization.  
  • Speed limits must not be increased.  
  • What’s wrong with grades at school ?  
  • Why tattoos should be considered as a form of fine art.  
  • Using all-natural bath and body products is the best choice for human health and safety.  
  • What is cancel culture?  
  • Why the Internet has become a problem of modern society.  
  • Illegal immigrants should be provided with basic social services.  
  • Smoking in public places must be banned for people’s safety and comfort.  
  • Why it is essential to control our nutrition .  
  • How to stimulate economic growth?  
  • Why exercise is beneficial for people.  
  • Studying history is decisive for the modern world.  
  • We must decrease fuel consumption to stop global warming.  
  • Why fighting social inequality is necessary.  
  • Why should businesses welcome remote work?  
  • Social media harms communication within families.   
  • College athletes should be paid for their achievements.  
  • Electronic books should replace print books.  
  • People should stop cutting down rainforest .  
  • Why every company should have a web page .  
  • Tips To Write An Effective Persuasive Essay: The College Puzzle, Stanford University
  • 31 Powerful Persuasive Writing Techniques: Writtent
  • Persuasive Essay Outline: Houston Community College System
  • Essays that Worked: Hamilton College
  • Argumentative Essays // Purdue Writing Lab
  • Persuasion – Writing for Success (University of Minnesota)
  • Persuasive Writing (Manitoba Education)
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100 Persuasive Essay Topics

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Persuasive essays are a bit like argument essays and persuasive speeches , but they tend to be a little kinder and gentler. Argument essays require you to discuss and to attack an alternate view, while persuasive essays are attempts to convince the reader that you have a believable argument. In other words, you are an advocate, not an adversary.

A Persuasive Essay Has 3 Components

  • Introduction : This is the opening paragraph of your essay. It contains the hook, which is used to grab the reader's attention, and the thesis, or argument, which you'll explain in the next section.
  • Body : This is the heart of your essay, usually three to five paragraphs in length. Each paragraph examines one theme or issue used to support your thesis.
  • Conclusion : This is the final paragraph of your essay. In it, you'll sum up the main points of the body and connect them to your thesis. Persuasive essays often use the conclusion as a last appeal to the audience.

Learning how to write a persuasive essay is an essential skill that people use every day in fields from business to law to media and entertainment. English students can begin writing a persuasive essay at any skill level. You're sure to find a sample topic or two from the list of 100 persuasive essays below, sorted by degree of difficulty.

Watch Now: 12 Ideas for Great Persuasive Essay Topics

  • Kids should get paid for good grades.
  • Students should have less homework.
  • Snow days are great for family time.
  • Penmanship is important.
  • Short hair is better than long hair.
  • We should all grow our own vegetables.
  • We need more holidays.
  • Aliens probably exist.
  • Gym class is more important than music class.
  • Kids should be able to vote.
  • Kids should get paid for extra activities like sports.
  • School should take place in the evenings.
  • Country life is better than city life.
  • City life is better than country life.
  • We can change the world.
  • Skateboard helmets should be mandatory.
  • We should provide food for the poor.
  • Children should be paid for doing chores.
  • We should populate the moon .
  • Dogs make better pets than cats.

Intermediate

  • The government should impose household trash limits.
  • Nuclear weapons are an effective deterrent against foreign attack.
  • Teens should be required to take parenting classes.
  • We should teach etiquette in schools.
  • School uniform laws are unconstitutional.
  • All students should wear uniforms.
  • Too much money is a bad thing.
  • High schools should offer specialized degrees in arts or sciences.
  • Magazine advertisements send unhealthy signals to young women.
  • Robocalling should be outlawed.
  • Age 12 is too young to babysit.
  • Children should be required to read more.
  • All students should be given the opportunity to study abroad.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory past age 65.
  • Cell phones should never be used while driving.
  • All schools should implement bullying awareness programs.
  • Bullies should be kicked out of school.
  • Parents of bullies should have to pay a fine.
  • The school year should be longer.
  • School days should start later.
  • Teens should be able to choose their bedtime.
  • There should be a mandatory entrance exam for high school.
  • Public transit should be privatized.
  • We should allow pets in school.
  • The voting age should be lowered to 16.
  • Beauty contests are bad for body image.
  • Every American should learn to speak Spanish.
  • Every immigrant should learn to speak English.
  • Video games can be educational.
  • College athletes should be paid for their services.
  • We need a military draft .
  • Professional sports should eliminate cheerleaders.
  • Teens should be able to start driving at 14 instead of 16.
  • Year-round school is a bad idea.
  • High school campuses should be guarded by police officers.
  • The legal drinking age should be lowered to 19.
  • Kids under 15 shouldn't have Facebook pages.
  • Standardized testing should be eliminated.
  • Teachers should be paid more.
  • There should be one world currency.
  • Domestic surveillance without a warrant should be legal.
  • Letter grades should be replaced with a pass or fail.
  • Every family should have a natural disaster survival plan.
  • Parents should talk to kids about drugs at a young age.
  • Racial slurs should be illegal.
  • Gun ownership should be tightly regulated.
  • Puerto Rico should be granted statehood.
  • People should go to jail when they abandon their pets.
  • Free speech should have limitations.
  • Members of Congress should be subject to term limits.
  • Recycling should be mandatory for everyone.
  • High-speed internet access should be regulated like a public utility.
  • Yearly driving tests should be mandatory for the first five years after getting a license.
  • Recreational marijuana should be made legal nationwide.
  • Legal marijuana should be taxed and regulated like tobacco or alcohol.
  • Child support dodgers should go to jail.
  • Students should be allowed to pray in school.
  • All Americans have a constitutional right to health care.
  • Internet access should be free for everyone.
  • Social Security should be privatized.
  • Pregnant couples should receive parenting lessons.
  • We shouldn't use products made from animals.
  • Celebrities should have more privacy rights.
  • Professional football is too violent and should be banned.
  • We need better sex education in schools.
  • School testing is not effective.
  • The United States should build a border wall with Mexico and with Canada.
  • Life is better than it was 50 years ago.
  • Eating meat is unethical.
  • A vegan diet is the only diet people should follow.
  • Medical testing on animals should be illegal.
  • The Electoral College is outdated.
  • Medical testing on animals is necessary.
  • Public safety is more important than an individual's right to privacy.
  • Single-sex colleges provide a better education.
  • Books should never be banned.
  • Violent video games can cause people to act violently in real life.
  • Freedom of religion has limitations.
  • Nuclear power should be illegal.
  • Climate change should be the president's primary political concern.
  • Arizona State University Writing Center staff. " Persuasive Essay Structure ." ASU.edu, June 2012.
  • Collins, Jen, and Polak, Adam. " Persuasive Essays ." Hamilton.edu.
  • 100 Persuasive Speech Topics for Students
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So much is at stake in writing a conclusion. This is, after all, your last chance to persuade your readers to your point of view, to impress yourself upon them as a writer and thinker. And the impression you create in your conclusion will shape the impression that stays with your readers after they've finished the essay.

The end of an essay should therefore convey a sense of completeness and closure as well as a sense of the lingering possibilities of the topic, its larger meaning, its implications: the final paragraph should close the discussion without closing it off.

To establish a sense of closure, you might do one or more of the following:

  • Conclude by linking the last paragraph to the first, perhaps by reiterating a word or phrase you used at the beginning.
  • Conclude with a sentence composed mainly of one-syllable words. Simple language can help create an effect of understated drama.
  • Conclude with a sentence that's compound or parallel in structure; such sentences can establish a sense of balance or order that may feel just right at the end of a complex discussion.

To close the discussion without closing it off, you might do one or more of the following:

  • Conclude with a quotation from or reference to a primary or secondary source, one that amplifies your main point or puts it in a different perspective. A quotation from, say, the novel or poem you're writing about can add texture and specificity to your discussion; a critic or scholar can help confirm or complicate your final point. For example, you might conclude an essay on the idea of home in James Joyce's short story collection,  Dubliners , with information about Joyce's own complex feelings towards Dublin, his home. Or you might end with a biographer's statement about Joyce's attitude toward Dublin, which could illuminate his characters' responses to the city. Just be cautious, especially about using secondary material: make sure that you get the last word.
  • Conclude by setting your discussion into a different, perhaps larger, context. For example, you might end an essay on nineteenth-century muckraking journalism by linking it to a current news magazine program like  60 Minutes .
  • Conclude by redefining one of the key terms of your argument. For example, an essay on Marx's treatment of the conflict between wage labor and capital might begin with Marx's claim that the "capitalist economy is . . . a gigantic enterprise of dehumanization "; the essay might end by suggesting that Marxist analysis is itself dehumanizing because it construes everything in economic -- rather than moral or ethical-- terms.
  • Conclude by considering the implications of your argument (or analysis or discussion). What does your argument imply, or involve, or suggest? For example, an essay on the novel  Ambiguous Adventure , by the Senegalese writer Cheikh Hamidou Kane, might open with the idea that the protagonist's development suggests Kane's belief in the need to integrate Western materialism and Sufi spirituality in modern Senegal. The conclusion might make the new but related point that the novel on the whole suggests that such an integration is (or isn't) possible.

Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay:

  • Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas.
  • Avoid phrases like "in conclusion," "to conclude," "in summary," and "to sum up." These phrases can be useful--even welcome--in oral presentations. But readers can see, by the tell-tale compression of the pages, when an essay is about to end. You'll irritate your audience if you belabor the obvious.
  • Resist the urge to apologize. If you've immersed yourself in your subject, you now know a good deal more about it than you can possibly include in a five- or ten- or 20-page essay. As a result, by the time you've finished writing, you may be having some doubts about what you've produced. (And if you haven't immersed yourself in your subject, you may be feeling even more doubtful about your essay as you approach the conclusion.) Repress those doubts. Don't undercut your authority by saying things like, "this is just one approach to the subject; there may be other, better approaches. . ."

Copyright 1998, Pat Bellanca, for the Writing Center at Harvard University

IMAGES

  1. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

  2. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

  3. 10 Easy Steps: How to Write a Thesis for an Essay in 2024

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

  4. FREE 8+ Persuasive Essay Samples in MS Word

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

  5. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

  6. 50 Free Persuasive Essay Examples (+BEST Topics) ᐅ TemplateLab

    how to write a good thesis for persuasive essay

VIDEO

  1. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part2 Breakdown

  2. Finding and Writing Thesis Statements

  3. Writing The Thesis Proposal

  4. How to write your persuasive thesis approval

  5. Craft Your Perfect Thesis Statement

  6. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part3 Introduction Paragraph

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Step 1: Start with a question Step 2: Write your initial answer Step 3: Develop your answer Step 4: Refine your thesis statement Types of thesis statements Other interesting articles Frequently asked questions about thesis statements What is a thesis statement? A thesis statement summarizes the central points of your essay.

  2. 30 Persuasive Thesis Statement Examples to Persuade

    1. Is a college education necessary? A college education is not the right choice for everyone, as many students graduate with a large amount of student debt and limited job opportunities. 2. Does Facebook (or other forms of social media) create isolation?

  3. Strong Thesis Statements

    An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people.

  4. How to Write a Thesis Statement

    Before we get into details, here are the basic steps for how to write a thesis statement: Develop the best topic to cover in your paper Phrase your topic as a question-and-answer Add some polish We'll describe each of those steps in more detail below, but we wanted to share a quick guide.

  5. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

    Guide Overview What is a "thesis statement" anyway? 2 categories of thesis statements: informative and persuasive 2 styles of thesis statements Formula for a strong argumentative thesis The qualities of a solid thesis statement (video) What is a "thesis statement" anyway? You may have heard of something called a "thesis."

  6. Thesis Statement Examples for Persuasive Essay, How to Write, Tips

    / Thesis Statement / Thesis Statement Examples for Persuasive Essay, How to Write, Tips Crafting a compelling thesis for a persuasive essay is fundamental in anchoring your argument and driving your message home. A persuasive thesis not only states your position but also presents the argument you'll use to sway your reader.

  7. Persuasive Writing Strategies and Tips, with Examples

    Matt Ellis Updated on June 2, 2022 Students Persuasive writing is any written work that tries to convince the reader of the writer's opinion. Aside from standard writing skills, a persuasive essay author can also draw on personal experience, logical arguments, an appeal to emotion, and compelling speech to influence readers.

  8. Developing a Thesis Statement

    A thesis statement . . . Makes an argumentative assertion about a topic; it states the conclusions that you have reached about your topic. Makes a promise to the reader about the scope, purpose, and direction of your paper. Is focused and specific enough to be "proven" within the boundaries of your paper. Is generally located near the end ...

  9. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

    The first step in writing a persuasive essay is choosing a topic and picking a side. If the topic is something you believe in, it will make the entire experience of researching, writing, and arguing your perspective more personal. Choosing a topic that appeals to you on an emotional or sentimental level will make its defense easier.

  10. Persuasive Essay Guide: How to Write a Persuasive Essay

    Many writers approach the persuasive essay writing process differently, but there are a few general guidelines to follow when persuading your audience with your words. Here is how to write an effective personal essay. 1. Pick a topic you're passionate about.

  11. Creating a Thesis Statement, Thesis Statement Tips

    Tips for Writing Your Thesis Statement. 1. Determine what kind of paper you are writing: An analytical paper breaks down an issue or an idea into its component parts, evaluates the issue or idea, and presents this breakdown and evaluation to the audience.; An expository (explanatory) paper explains something to the audience.; An argumentative paper makes a claim about a topic and justifies ...

  12. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Tips and Tricks

    TIP 1: Be careful not to introduce a new argument in the conclusion—there's no time to develop it now that you've reached the end of your discussion! TIP 2: As with your thesis, avoid announcing your conclusion. Don't start your conclusion with "in conclusion" or "to conclude" or "to end my essay" type statements.

  13. How to Create a Thesis Statement for a Persuasive Essay

    Your thesis statement should answer one or both of two key questions: "how" and "why." For example, if you think that online learning is more effective for students than traditional instruction, then your thesis should tell readers how or why it's more effective.

  14. Writing Persuasive Essays

    A thesis is a clearly worded statement telling readers exactly what the writer intends to do in the essay. Good persuasive writing does not make the reader guess as to what the author's intentions were. The writer's intent should be made very clear. The best place to do this is immediately after the attention catcher.

  15. The Thesis Statement in a Persuasive Text

    Rate the Thesis Statement using a scale from 1 to 6, where 6 will stand for the best Thesis Statement and 1 will be given to the poorest. Be prepared to explain the reasons you have to support your rating. a. The United States has more accidents caused by drivers under the influence of alcohol than other countries where there is no MLDA ( ) b.

  16. Thesis Statement Essay Examples: Master the Art of Persuasion with

    How to Write a Good Thesis Statement. When asked to write a thesis statement, many students struggle for a long time since they are unsure of what should be included. A well-planned essay structure can be the key to a swift completion of that academic paper. So, with the help of our admission essay writing service, let's dissect the ...

  17. How to Write a Persuasive Essay (This Convinced My Professor!)

    Thesis 1: In a mythical match, the mermaid would overcome the dolphin due to one distinct advantage: her ability to breathe underwater. Thesis 2: The full spectrum of color displayed on New England hillsides is just one reason why fall in the northeast is better than in Colorado. Thesis 3: In addition to not adding to vehicle traffic, electric bikes are a better investment than electric cars ...

  18. How to Write a Persuasive Thesis (with Pictures)

    1 Understand the thesis assignment. Some instructors, colleges, and universities have very strict requirements about what a thesis must include. [2] Read your syllabus, assignment rubric, or course website thoroughly in order to understand exactly what is required of you. [3] Some questions to ask yourself include: How long must my thesis be?

  19. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    read an essay that argues this thesis You will know why your essay is worth writing if you are trying to answer a question that doesn't have an obvious answer; to propose a solution to a problem without one obvious solution; or to point out something that others may not have noticed that changes the way we consider a phenomenon, source, or idea.

  20. Persuasive Speech Thesis Statement Examples, How to Write, Tips

    A good thesis statement for a persuasive speech should be clear, concise, arguable, and specific. Here's an example: Topic: Reducing meat consumption for environmental purposes. Thesis Statement: "Reducing our meat consumption by half can significantly decrease our carbon footprint, lessen water usage, and help in preserving essential ...

  21. How to Write a Persuasive Essay (Video)

    Building a Persuasive Body. Next comes the body paragraphs. The body of a persuasive essay holds all the main points you as the writer want to argue. It's best to separate your points by paragraphs; so, if you have three main arguments, you should have at least three body paragraphs explaining them in detail.

  22. 113 Perfect Persuasive Essay Topics for Any Assignment

    Thesis: A sentence that sums up what the essay be discussing and what your stance on the issue is. Reasons you believe your side of the argument: Why do you support the side you do? Typically each main point will have its own body paragraph. Evidence supporting your argument: Facts or examples to back up your main points.

  23. How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Step-by-Step Guide + Examples

    🐾 How to Write a Persuasive Essay Step by Step These nine steps are the closest thing you will find to a shortcut for writing to persuade. With practice, you may get through these steps quickly—or even figure out new techniques in persuasive writing. 📑 Persuasive Essay Outline Below you'll find an example of a persuasive essay outline.

  24. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics

    50 Argumentative Essay Topics. 100 Persuasive Essay Topics. Writing an Introduction. How to Begin an Essay. Writing a Great First Paragraph. Strong Thesis Statements. Attention-Grabbing Opening Sentences. Structuring and Outlining. Create an Outline Using a Venn Diagram.

  25. Ending the Essay: Conclusions

    Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so. But shorter essays tend not to require a restatement of your main ideas. Avoid phrases like "in conclusion," "to conclude," "in summary," and "to sum up ...

  26. How to Write an AP Lang Synthesis Essay: Tips & Steps

    Step 6. Revise and edit. First, review your text for coherence, clarity, and accuracy. Second, check your AP Lang argument essay example for grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors. Third, make revisions as needed to strengthen your argument and improve the overall quality of your work.

  27. Health Informatics Essay Writing

    However, students studying this field have to clear a health informatics essay to earn good grades. According to Precedence Research, the healthcare informatics market is predicted to reach approximately $104.80 billion by 2032, up from $33 billion in 2022. This represents a growth rate of 12.30% from 2023 to 2032.