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How to Create an Effective Thesis Statement in 5 Easy Steps

Creating a thesis statement can be a daunting task. It’s one of the most important sentences in your paper, and it needs to be done right. But don’t worry — with these five easy steps, you’ll be able to create an effective thesis statement in no time.

Step 1: Brainstorm Ideas

The first step is to brainstorm ideas for your paper. Think about what you want to say and write down any ideas that come to mind. This will help you narrow down your focus and make it easier to create your thesis statement.

Step 2: Research Your Topic

Once you have some ideas, it’s time to do some research on your topic. Look for sources that support your ideas and provide evidence for the points you want to make. This will help you refine your argument and make it more convincing.

Step 3: Formulate Your Argument

Now that you have done some research, it’s time to formulate your argument. Take the points you want to make and put them into one or two sentences that clearly state what your paper is about. This will be the basis of your thesis statement.

Step 4: Refine Your Thesis Statement

Once you have formulated your argument, it’s time to refine your thesis statement. Make sure that it is clear, concise, and specific. It should also be arguable so that readers can disagree with it if they choose.

Step 5: Test Your Thesis Statement

The last step is to test your thesis statement. Does it accurately reflect the points you want to make? Is it clear and concise? Does it make an arguable point? If not, go back and refine it until it meets all of these criteria.

Creating an effective thesis statement doesn’t have to be a daunting task. With these five easy steps, you can create a strong thesis statement in no time at all.

This text was generated using a large language model, and select text has been reviewed and moderated for purposes such as readability.

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Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Developing Strong Thesis Statements

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These OWL resources will help you develop and refine the arguments in your writing.

The thesis statement or main claim must be debatable

An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could reasonably have differing opinions on. If your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted as fact then there is no reason to try to persuade people.

Example of a non-debatable thesis statement:

This thesis statement is not debatable. First, the word pollution implies that something is bad or negative in some way. Furthermore, all studies agree that pollution is a problem; they simply disagree on the impact it will have or the scope of the problem. No one could reasonably argue that pollution is unambiguously good.

Example of a debatable thesis statement:

This is an example of a debatable thesis because reasonable people could disagree with it. Some people might think that this is how we should spend the nation's money. Others might feel that we should be spending more money on education. Still others could argue that corporations, not the government, should be paying to limit pollution.

Another example of a debatable thesis statement:

In this example there is also room for disagreement between rational individuals. Some citizens might think focusing on recycling programs rather than private automobiles is the most effective strategy.

The thesis needs to be narrow

Although the scope of your paper might seem overwhelming at the start, generally the narrower the thesis the more effective your argument will be. Your thesis or claim must be supported by evidence. The broader your claim is, the more evidence you will need to convince readers that your position is right.

Example of a thesis that is too broad:

There are several reasons this statement is too broad to argue. First, what is included in the category "drugs"? Is the author talking about illegal drug use, recreational drug use (which might include alcohol and cigarettes), or all uses of medication in general? Second, in what ways are drugs detrimental? Is drug use causing deaths (and is the author equating deaths from overdoses and deaths from drug related violence)? Is drug use changing the moral climate or causing the economy to decline? Finally, what does the author mean by "society"? Is the author referring only to America or to the global population? Does the author make any distinction between the effects on children and adults? There are just too many questions that the claim leaves open. The author could not cover all of the topics listed above, yet the generality of the claim leaves all of these possibilities open to debate.

Example of a narrow or focused thesis:

In this example the topic of drugs has been narrowed down to illegal drugs and the detriment has been narrowed down to gang violence. This is a much more manageable topic.

We could narrow each debatable thesis from the previous examples in the following way:

Narrowed debatable thesis 1:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just the amount of money used but also how the money could actually help to control pollution.

Narrowed debatable thesis 2:

This thesis narrows the scope of the argument by specifying not just what the focus of a national anti-pollution campaign should be but also why this is the appropriate focus.

Qualifiers such as " typically ," " generally ," " usually ," or " on average " also help to limit the scope of your claim by allowing for the almost inevitable exception to the rule.

Types of claims

Claims typically fall into one of four categories. Thinking about how you want to approach your topic, or, in other words, what type of claim you want to make, is one way to focus your thesis on one particular aspect of your broader topic.

Claims of fact or definition: These claims argue about what the definition of something is or whether something is a settled fact. Example:

Claims of cause and effect: These claims argue that one person, thing, or event caused another thing or event to occur. Example:

Claims about value: These are claims made of what something is worth, whether we value it or not, how we would rate or categorize something. Example:

Claims about solutions or policies: These are claims that argue for or against a certain solution or policy approach to a problem. Example:

Which type of claim is right for your argument? Which type of thesis or claim you use for your argument will depend on your position and knowledge of the topic, your audience, and the context of your paper. You might want to think about where you imagine your audience to be on this topic and pinpoint where you think the biggest difference in viewpoints might be. Even if you start with one type of claim you probably will be using several within the paper. Regardless of the type of claim you choose to utilize it is key to identify the controversy or debate you are addressing and to define your position early on in the paper.

Module 9: Academic Argument

Argumentative thesis statements, learning objective.

  • Recognize an argumentative thesis

A strong, argumentative thesis statement should take a stance about an issue. It should explain the basics of your argument and help your reader to know what to expect in your essay.

This video reviews the necessary components of a thesis statement and walks through some examples.

You can view the transcript for “Purdue OWL: Thesis Statements” here (opens in new window) .

Key Features of Argumentative Thesis Statements

Below are some of the key features of an argumentative thesis statement. An argumentative thesis is debatable, assertive, reasonable, evidence-based, and focused.

An argumentative thesis must make a claim about which reasonable people can disagree. Statements of fact or areas of general agreement cannot be argumentative theses because few people disagree about them. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • Junk food is bad for your health.

This is not a debatable thesis. Most people would agree that junk food is bad for your health. Also what kind of junk food? Is there a way to make this thesis a bit more specific? A debatable thesis might be:

  • Because junk food is bad for your health, the size of sodas offered at fast-food restaurants should be regulated by the federal government.

Reasonable people could agree or disagree with the statement. With this thesis statement, there is a more specific type of junk food (sodas), and there is call-to-action (federal regulation).

An argumentative thesis takes a position, asserting the writer’s stance. Questions, vague statements, or quotations from others are not argumentative theses because they do not assert the writer’s viewpoint. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • Federal immigration law is a tough issue for American citizens.

This is not an arguable thesis because it does not assert a position. Start by asking questions about how to make this statement more specific. Which laws? What is the “tough issue” and why is it difficult? Take a look at this revision.

  •   Federal immigration enforcement law needs to be overhauled because it puts undue financial constraints on state and local government agencies.

This is an argumentative thesis because it asserts a position that immigration enforcement law needs to be changed. The “undue financial restraints” gives the writer a position to explore more.

An argumentative thesis must make a claim that is logical and possible. Claims that are outrageous or impossible are not argumentative theses. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • City council members are dishonest and should be thrown in jail.

This is not an argumentative thesis. City council members’ ineffectiveness is not a reason to send them to jail unless they have broken the law. A more useful question is to ask why are they dishonest? What can they do to improve?

  • City council members should not be allowed to receive cash incentives from local business leaders.

This is an arguable thesis because it is possible and reasonable to set ethical practices for business leaders.

Evidence-Based

An argumentative thesis must be able to be supported by evidence. Claims that presuppose value systems, morals, or religious beliefs cannot be supported with evidence and therefore are not argumentative theses. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • Individuals convicted of murder have committed a sin and they do not deserve additional correctional facility funding.

This is not an argumentative thesis because its support rests on religious beliefs or values rather than evidence. Let’s dig a bit deeper to think about what specifically you can address as a writer and why it is important to your argument. Let’s take a look at this revision:

  • Rehabilitation programs for individuals serving life sentences should be funded because these programs reduce violence within prisons.

This is an argumentative thesis because evidence such as case studies and statistics can be used to support it. The subject is a bit more specific (individuals serving life sentences) and the claim can be supported with research (programs that reduce violence within prisons).

An argumentative thesis must be focused and narrow. A focused, narrow claim is clearer, more able to be supported with evidence, and more persuasive than a broad, general claim. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • The federal government should overhaul the U.S. tax code.

This is not an effective argumentative thesis because it is too general (Which part of the government? Which tax codes? What sections of those tax codes?). This is more of a book-length project and it would require an overwhelming amount of evidence to be fully supported. Let’s take a look at a revision:

  • The U.S. House of Representatives should vote to repeal the federal estate tax because the revenue generated by that tax is negligible.

This is an effective argumentative thesis because it identifies a specific actor and action and can be fully supported with evidence about the amount of revenue the estate tax generates. By starting with a too broad focus, you can ask questions to create a more specific thesis statement.

In the practice exercises below, see if you can recognize and evaluate argumentative thesis statements. Keep in mind that a sound argumentative thesis should be debatable, assertive, reasonable, evidence-based, and focused. If you choose the incorrect response, read why it is not an argumentative thesis.

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9.4: Argumentative Thesis Statements

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Learning Objective

  • Recognize an argumentative thesis

A strong, argumentative thesis statement should take a stance about an issue. It should explain the basics of your argument and help your reader to know what to expect in your essay.

This video reviews the necessary components of a thesis statement and walks through some examples.

You can view the transcript for “Purdue OWL: Thesis Statements” here (opens in new window) .

Key Features of Argumentative Thesis Statements

Below are some of the key features of an argumentative thesis statement. An argumentative thesis is debatable, assertive, reasonable, evidence-based, and focused.

An argumentative thesis must make a claim about which reasonable people can disagree. Statements of fact or areas of general agreement cannot be argumentative theses because few people disagree about them. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • BAD: Junk food is bad for your health.

This is not a debatable thesis. Most people would agree that junk food is bad for your health. A debatable thesis would be:

  • GOOD: Because junk food is bad for your health, the size of sodas offered at fast-food restaurants should be regulated by the federal government.

Reasonable people could agree or disagree with the statement.

An argumentative thesis takes a position, asserting the writer’s stance. Questions, vague statements, or quotations from others are not argumentative theses because they do not assert the writer’s viewpoint. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • BAD: Federal immigration law is a tough issue about which many people disagree.

This is not an arguable thesis because it does not assert a position.

  • GOOD: Federal immigration enforcement law needs to be overhauled because it puts undue constraints on state and local police.

This is an argumentative thesis because it asserts a position that immigration enforcement law needs to be changed.

An argumentative thesis must make a claim that is logical and possible. Claims that are outrageous or impossible are not argumentative theses. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • BAD: City council members are dishonest and should be thrown in jail.

This is not an argumentative thesis. City council members’ ineffectiveness is not a reason to send them to jail.

  • GOOD: City council members should be term-limited to prevent one group or party from maintaining control indefinitely.

This is an arguable thesis because term limits are possible, and shared political control is a reasonable goal.

Evidence-Based

An argumentative thesis must be able to be supported by evidence. Claims that presuppose value systems, morals, or religious beliefs cannot be supported with evidence and therefore are not argumentative theses. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • BAD: Individuals convicted of murder will go to hell when they die.

This is not an argumentative thesis because its support rests on religious beliefs or values rather than evidence.

  • GOOD: Rehabilitation programs for individuals serving life sentences should be funded because these programs reduce violence within prisons.

This is an argumentative thesis because evidence such as case studies and statistics can be used to support it.

An argumentative thesis must be focused and narrow. A focused, narrow claim is clearer, more able to be supported with evidence, and more persuasive than a broad, general claim. Let’s take a look at an example:

  • BAD: The federal government should overhaul the U.S. tax code.

This is not an effective argumentative thesis because it is too general (What part of the government? Which tax codes? What sections of those tax codes?) and would require an overwhelming amount of evidence to be fully supported.

  • GOOD: The U.S. House of Representatives should vote to repeal the federal estate tax because the revenue generated by that tax is negligible.

This is an effective argumentative thesis because it identifies a specific actor and action and can be fully supported with evidence about the amount of revenue the estate tax generates.

In the practice exercises below, you will use this information from your reading to see if you can recognize and evaluate argumentative thesis statements. Keep in mind that a sound argumentative thesis should be debatable, assertive, reasonable, evidence-based, and focused.

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  • Argumentative Thesis Statements. Provided by : University of Mississippi. License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Argumentative Thesis Activity. Provided by : Excelsior College. Located at : http://owl.excelsior.edu/argument-and-critical-thinking/argumentative-thesis/argumentative-thesis-activity/ . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Purdue OWL: Thesis Statements. Provided by : OWLPurdue. Located at : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKXkemYldmw . License : Other . License Terms : Standard YouTube License

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Argumentative Thesis

birds arguing

As explained in Research , not all essays will require an explicitly stated thesis, but most argumentative essays will. Instead of implying your thesis or main idea, in an argumentative essay, you’ll most likely be required to write out your thesis statement for your audience. A thesis statement is a one- to two-sentence statement that presents the main idea and makes an assertion about your issue. You may have a longer thesis for much longer essays, but one to two sentences is a good general guideline. And, remember, in an argumentative essay, the assertion you present in your thesis is going to be particularly important.

When you make your assertion in your thesis, it should be clear and direct. You want your audience to have no doubt about your point. Of course, how assertive you are in your thesis and the content you choose to include depends upon the type of argumentative essay you are writing. For example, in a Classical or Aristotelian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis statement should clearly present your side of the issue. In a Rogerian argument (explained in pages that follow), your thesis should bring both sides of the issue together.

Still, there are some basic guidelines to keep in mind when it comes to an argumentative thesis statement.

  • Your thesis statement should be one to two sentences .
  • Your thesis statement should clearly present the main idea of your essay and make some kind of assertion (even if that assertion is about bringing two sides together).
  • Your thesis should not make an “announcement” about what your essay will cover. Instead, it should just present your assertion. For example, a thesis like this makes an announcement:

In this paper, I will persuade you to vote for candidates who support education reform.

Instead you might write:

Because our education system is in need of reform, we should vote for candidates who are willing to make the necessary changes.

  • While there is no such thing as a “required” place for your thesis statement, most academic essays will present the thesis statement early on, usually near the end of the introduction . There is a reason for this. Audience members are more likely to understand and absorb each point as readers if you have told them, in advance, what they should be getting out of your essay. Still, you should check with your professor if you would like to present your thesis somewhere else, such as at the end of your essay.
  • Your thesis statement is the most important sentence in your essay. It’s your chance to make sure your audience really understands your point. Be sure your assertion and your writing style are clear.

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how to make a thesis statement debatable

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A Strong Thesis Statement: Tips and Examples | Make a Stand

A thesis statement is a central element of an academic essay and an important academic writing skill. It presents  the major message of the paper  and a short  summary of the points  you make. This way, a thesis statement prepares your reader and facilitates understanding. 

It is a thesis statement that adds logic and coherency to your writing. 

A logical and coherent essay can be written only around a thesis statement: presented in the  introduction , supported in the  body paragraphs , and restated in the  conclusion . 

The good news is that once you have a strong thesis statement, you know what to include in each of these elements of an  essay structure . 

So let me show you what a  strong thesis statement  looks like. 

What Makes a Good Thesis Statement

A good thesis statement is :

  • Relevant to the essay type

If your goal is to argue, a thesis statement should present an argument; if your goal is to compare, it compares, and so on. If you need to analyze a debate on an  argumentative topic , and your thesis statement argues your own position on it, do not expect an effective essay or a good grade. 

  • Debatable  

Purdue Owl Writing Lab  emphasizes that a strong thesis statement is debatable. What does it mean? It should not be common knowledge, a fact, or something all reasonable people will agree to like “ Violence is bad for society ”. To be debatable, a thesis statement should be a summary of your own conclusions, which can be debated or refuted by the reader.  

Neither a short essay nor even  a thesis  is able to cover all the controversies of a large topic. Thus, an essay topic and, consequently, a thesis statement should be narrowed. This means that instead of arguing that “ People should avoid sexism ”, you can argue that “ The X country should start regulating sexism in job proposals and on job interviews ”. 

  • Written using a nice parallel structure

If you include reasons in your thesis statement, it becomes a rather long sentence. To facilitate reading and understanding, make sure your thesis statement has a parallel structure. For example,  “The United States should refuse from capital punishment overall, as this practice  is irreversible , extremely  expensive  for the state, and  painful  for the victims’ relatives”  or  “Capital punishment should be forbidden as it  allows  killing people, whose innocence may be proven later,  triggers  enormous expenses, and  causes  suffering to the victims’ relatives due to long and repetitive trials”.

How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

Thesis Statement  for an Argumentative Essay

A thesis statement for an argumentative essay should show your position – the claim you make regarding the controversial topic. There are  three types of claims  you can make:

  • claim of fact (X happens/is true/is false)
  • claim of value (X is bad/good)
  • claim of policy (we/everyone/the state should/should not do X)

Mind, in most cases you have to avoid using personal pronouns; thus, you can’t write, “I think the Internet ruins our mind.” Instead, you write a claim you make, “the Internet ruins the human mind”, and support it with several arguments.

Therefore,  here are the best patterns to use:

                         Because of A, B, and C, the claim is such.                          The claim is such as it (is) A, B, C.

Using such a pattern is great, for it helps you structure your essay and add logic and coherence to it, as  each supporting point becomes a topic sentence of a paragraph developing the idea . For example, the essay on capital punishment can have three paragraphs beginning with such sentences:

1 para: There have been many cases when people, executed for a crime, were eventually proven not guilty. 2 para: The experts emphasize that capital punishment does not reduce the level of crime, so the enormous expenses associated with the trial and execution are not justified. 3 para: Furthermore, a long process of conviction puts extra pressure on victims’ relatives and keeps their wounds sore.

You may also formulate a thesis statement around  several aspects of the issue . For example,

“Contrary to   concerns , the Internet promotes both individual intelligence and the collective intelligence of society.”

Thesis Statement for Other Types of Academic Essays

The purpose of thesis statements is to inform the reader what your essay wants to say. As different types of essays accomplish different missions, their thesis statements will differ. 

A thesis statement for a school essay/ Toefl or IELTS essay  should state your opinion and present the supporting points just like an argumentative essay. The main difference is that you can freely use “I” and include personal facts as reasons supporting your position. For example, 

I believe it is better to live in the city because A, B, C.

A thesis statement for a compare and contrast paper  has to show the actual similarities and/or differences you have found in the pieces you have been comparing. For example, 

Although Edmund Wall and Vaughana Feary both consider harassment an unwelcome statement or conduct of a sexual character, their ideas differ in several important points, which makes the scholars view cases of (possible) sexual harassment differently.

A thesis statement for   a rhetorical analysis essay  should state whether the author has created a persuasive argument and what made him (not)succeed in doing so. For example, 

The author managed to build a persuasive argument in favor of … due to the effective use of ethos, logos and pathos.  or The author has started with an effective argument in favor of a gun carry, but later focus on emotional appeal with little factual support has weakened the author’s argument. 

When your task is to  analyze a poem, a short story or an article , your thesis statement should explain what the text communicates and how (what supporting points the author uses in his argument). For example, 

The poem … creates a vivid image of war due to A, B, C (e.g. the use of metaphors, alliteration, etc.) In the article …, Author creates an effective argument against the use of technology at school. 

A thesis statement for a response paper  should give your evaluation of the source, tell what you consider its core strengths and weaknesses. For example, 

I consider the article by … to be biased and based on unsupported generalizations. The chapter … gives a very good insight of …

A thesis statement for a literature review  should provide a conclusion you have made. Note, this is not a conclusion on separate sources, it is a conclusion on the existing knowledge on the topic.  Here are some examples of such thesis statements: 

Despite the long history of enquire into the effect of TV viewing on children, the topic remains controversial. According to research, parental divorce has a particularly negative impact on children.  

A thesis statement for the problem and solution essay  has to state what solution is best to the problem you consider:

Investing in the healthcare of developing nations is the most humane and effective way to tackle   overpopulation . 

A thesis statement for a cause and effect essay  should either identify the cause for a particular effect or an effect for a particular cause. For example, 

A growing rate of divorces is the consequence of A, B, C (changing society values, poor communication skills, unrealistic expectations of marriage, etc.). Bullying has multiple long-term effects such as A, B, C (lower self-esteem, inability to trust people, etc.)

Place and Length of a Thesis Statement

A thesis statement usually appears  at the end of an introduction  and is usually  one sentence .

When you are allowed or expected to be creative, you may violate this rule and finish with something emphatic. Consider the following example. Here, a thesis statement is a last but one sentence so that an introduction finishes with an emphatic direct quotation:

Though there are theories of the future, where the humans benefit from the merge with robots, the prospects of humans to be the governing force in this new form of life are rather doom. As Lev Grossman puts it, “You don’t have to be a super-intelligent cyborg to understand that introducing a superior life-form into your own biosphere is a basic Darwinian error”.

If you include a roadmap for the paper, place it at the end of the first paragraph, after a thesis statement.

Do not confuse a thesis statement with a roadmap!

A roadmap is a description of what the paper will consider; it is a short plan of the paper, which helps the reader not to get lost. It is usually included only in longer works with several sections or even chapters. A roadmap may look like this,

Chapter 1 will be devoted to … Chapter 2 will look into … Therefore, Chapter 3 will consider … A Conclusion will …

“This paper will look into the effect of the Internet on people’s mind”  is neither a thesis nor a roadmap. Forget this pattern once and for all!

In a better case, if the paper was meant to investigate the debate over the effect of the Internet, the statement will be considered a weak thesis statement. However, if you had to write an argumentative essay, you can get  F  (yes,  Fail ) because the main purpose of an argumentative essay is to argue and make a claim.

Good Thesis Statement

How do I write a thesis statement?

First, do your research: do a rhetorical analysis of a persuasive piece you have chosen, analyze two texts you are comparing and note similarities and differences, analyze several different positions that writers of credible sources take and note, which argument sounds more convincing for you, etc. If you have made your research right, you might already have a clue about what to include in your thesis statement using one of the above examples as a sample. 

Can you help me with my thesis statement? 

Yes, for sure. You may ask for support in this  Facebook group  I have created. If you  order editing , I will add or revise your thesis statement, and I will leave a recommendation concerning the appropriateness and strength of your thesis statement when  proofreading your essay . 

What is the formula for a thesis statement?

One formula of thesis statement won’t help, as a thesis statement is different for different types of academic essays. Even if you manage to find a ready-made thesis statement example for your topic, I would not recommend using it. Your thesis statement should summarise the arguments you are going to make – the ones, for which you have found support in credible sources. Using someone’s else thesis statement might make the process of research longer.  

How do you write a thesis statement in APA format?

The process of writing a thesis statement is similar for all formatting styles. A thesis statement does not require any specific formatting: bolding, italics, etc. It is just a normal sentence that you include at the end of your introduction.  

how to make a thesis statement debatable

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Writing Thesis Statements for Argumentative Essays

Read the article below (on the left) about thesis statements and then do the interactive quiz on the right. write only one word in each space..

Show all questions

  • In which paragraph is the thesis statement normally found? Check Hint Show answer
  • What is another word for 'argumentative'? Check Hint Show answer
  • The first step before writing a thesis statement is to _________ expert, academic articles to gather background information. Check Hint Show answer
  • When you __________ the arguments and findings of academic articles on the issue that you will write about, you will begin to choose those that are most credible and persuasive. Check Hint Show answer
  • Reading academic articles on the issue that you will write about will help you decide your __________. Check Hint Show answer
  • The first main point to remember about writing a thesis statement is to make it ___________. Check Hint Show answer
  • A good thesis statement should always leave room for _________. Check Hint Show answer
  • Another main point is that thesis statements need to be ___________. They should not be too broad or general. Check Hint Show answer
  • Writing specific thesis statements helps to narrow the possibilities that the writer will write about and provide _________ to the essay. Check Hint Show answer
  • A good thesis statement should not have more than ___________ controlling argument. Check Hint Show answer
  • ____________ details should be discussed in the body paragraphs that follow the introduction. Check Hint Show answer
  • Another key idea is that a thesis statement should always be very ___________ so that readers can identify the writer's position on the issue. Check Hint Show answer
  • A thesis statement should also always be as ____________ as possible. Using too many words may confuse or annoy readers. Check Hint Show answer
  • If an introduction has a clear, concise and debatable thesis statement with only one controlling idea, readers will be able to identify the writer's point of view and know exactly what to __________ from the essay before they read its body paragraphs. Check Hint Show answer

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Thesis Statement!

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

  2. 15 Thesis Statement Examples to Inspire Your Next Argumentative Essay

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

  3. What is a Thesis Statement

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

  4. How to Write a Strong Thesis Statement

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

  5. 30 Strong Thesis Statement Examples For Your Research Paper

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

  6. How to Create a Thesis Statement Debate Video

    how to make a thesis statement debatable

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  2. Lec 2... How to write Thesis Statement

  3. Writing a thesis statement

  4. Writing Tip: A Strong Thesis (teaser) #goodwriting #writingtips #essaywriting #academicyoutube

  5. Writing Thesis Statement

  6. Thesis statement Powtoon

COMMENTS

  1. How to Create an Effective Thesis Statement in 5 Easy Steps

    Creating a thesis statement can be a daunting task. It’s one of the most important sentences in your paper, and it needs to be done right. But don’t worry — with these five easy steps, you’ll be able to create an effective thesis statement ...

  2. Tips for Making a Solid Thesis Statement

    Writing a thesis statement can be one of the most challenging parts of writing an essay. A thesis statement is a sentence that summarizes the main point or argument of an essay. It should be clear, concise, and to the point.

  3. What Is a Good Thesis Statement?

    A good thesis statement is a single sentence contained in the introduction of a paper that provides the reader with some idea of what the writer is trying to convey in the body of the paper. The thesis statement is a condensed summary of th...

  4. Developing Strong Thesis Statements

    An argumentative or persuasive piece of writing must begin with a debatable thesis or claim. In other words, the thesis must be something that people could

  5. The Debatable Thesis

    you are being asked to develop a thesis. What makes a thesis statement “debatable?” • A thesis is an interpretation of a subject, not the subject itself. In

  6. Argumentative Thesis Statements

    An argumentative thesis takes a position, asserting the writer's stance. Questions, vague statements, or quotations from others are not an argumentative thesis

  7. Argumentative Thesis Statements

    Debatable. An argumentative thesis must make a claim about which reasonable people can disagree. Statements of fact or areas of general agreement cannot be

  8. 9.4: Argumentative Thesis Statements

    Debatable. An argumentative thesis must make a claim about which reasonable people can disagree. Statements of fact or areas of general

  9. Strong Thesis Statements for Argument Essays

    Example thesis statement. It is easy to demonstrate that pets help humans in many ways. School uniforms should be required for three reasons. College students

  10. Argumentative Thesis

    A thesis statement is a one- to two-sentence statement that presents the main idea and makes an assertion about your issue. You may have a longer thesis for

  11. 15 Thesis Statement Examples to Inspire Your Next Argumentative

    How to Make a Thesis Statement the Easy Way (Infographic) · How to ... Below are 15 debatable, supportable, and focused thesis statements for you

  12. A Strong Thesis Statement: Tips and Examples

    What Makes a Good Thesis Statement · Relevant to the essay type · Debatable · Narrow · Written using a nice parallel structure.

  13. Writing Thesis Statements for Argumentative Essays

    Example of an un-debatable thesis statement: 'Drinking too much alcohol may cause health problems.' This is weak because it would be very difficult to build a

  14. College Writing: Formulating an Arguable Thesis

    Now let's work on combining these three statements into our opening paragraph: College students spend a great deal of time texting their friends and family.