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How to Conclude an Essay | Interactive Example

Published on January 24, 2019 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

The conclusion is the final paragraph of your essay . A strong conclusion aims to:

  • Tie together the essay’s main points
  • Show why your argument matters
  • Leave the reader with a strong impression

Your conclusion should give a sense of closure and completion to your argument, but also show what new questions or possibilities it has opened up.

This conclusion is taken from our annotated essay example , which discusses the history of the Braille system. Hover over each part to see why it’s effective.

Braille paved the way for dramatic cultural changes in the way blind people were treated and the opportunities available to them. Louis Braille’s innovation was to reimagine existing reading systems from a blind perspective, and the success of this invention required sighted teachers to adapt to their students’ reality instead of the other way around. In this sense, Braille helped drive broader social changes in the status of blindness. New accessibility tools provide practical advantages to those who need them, but they can also change the perspectives and attitudes of those who do not.

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Table of contents

Step 1: return to your thesis, step 2: review your main points, step 3: show why it matters, what shouldn’t go in the conclusion, more examples of essay conclusions, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about writing an essay conclusion.

To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument.

Don’t just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction.

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Next, remind the reader of the main points that you used to support your argument.

Avoid simply summarizing each paragraph or repeating each point in order; try to bring your points together in a way that makes the connections between them clear. The conclusion is your final chance to show how all the paragraphs of your essay add up to a coherent whole.

To wrap up your conclusion, zoom out to a broader view of the topic and consider the implications of your argument. For example:

  • Does it contribute a new understanding of your topic?
  • Does it raise new questions for future study?
  • Does it lead to practical suggestions or predictions?
  • Can it be applied to different contexts?
  • Can it be connected to a broader debate or theme?

Whatever your essay is about, the conclusion should aim to emphasize the significance of your argument, whether that’s within your academic subject or in the wider world.

Try to end with a strong, decisive sentence, leaving the reader with a lingering sense of interest in your topic.

The easiest way to improve your conclusion is to eliminate these common mistakes.

Don’t include new evidence

Any evidence or analysis that is essential to supporting your thesis statement should appear in the main body of the essay.

The conclusion might include minor pieces of new information—for example, a sentence or two discussing broader implications, or a quotation that nicely summarizes your central point. But it shouldn’t introduce any major new sources or ideas that need further explanation to understand.

Don’t use “concluding phrases”

Avoid using obvious stock phrases to tell the reader what you’re doing:

  • “In conclusion…”
  • “To sum up…”

These phrases aren’t forbidden, but they can make your writing sound weak. By returning to your main argument, it will quickly become clear that you are concluding the essay—you shouldn’t have to spell it out.

Don’t undermine your argument

Avoid using apologetic phrases that sound uncertain or confused:

  • “This is just one approach among many.”
  • “There are good arguments on both sides of this issue.”
  • “There is no clear answer to this problem.”

Even if your essay has explored different points of view, your own position should be clear. There may be many possible approaches to the topic, but you want to leave the reader convinced that yours is the best one!

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academic essay conclusion phrases

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This conclusion is taken from an argumentative essay about the internet’s impact on education. It acknowledges the opposing arguments while taking a clear, decisive position.

The internet has had a major positive impact on the world of education; occasional pitfalls aside, its value is evident in numerous applications. The future of teaching lies in the possibilities the internet opens up for communication, research, and interactivity. As the popularity of distance learning shows, students value the flexibility and accessibility offered by digital education, and educators should fully embrace these advantages. The internet’s dangers, real and imaginary, have been documented exhaustively by skeptics, but the internet is here to stay; it is time to focus seriously on its potential for good.

This conclusion is taken from a short expository essay that explains the invention of the printing press and its effects on European society. It focuses on giving a clear, concise overview of what was covered in the essay.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

This conclusion is taken from a literary analysis essay about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein . It summarizes what the essay’s analysis achieved and emphasizes its originality.

By tracing the depiction of Frankenstein through the novel’s three volumes, I have demonstrated how the narrative structure shifts our perception of the character. While the Frankenstein of the first volume is depicted as having innocent intentions, the second and third volumes—first in the creature’s accusatory voice, and then in his own voice—increasingly undermine him, causing him to appear alternately ridiculous and vindictive. Far from the one-dimensional villain he is often taken to be, the character of Frankenstein is compelling because of the dynamic narrative frame in which he is placed. In this frame, Frankenstein’s narrative self-presentation responds to the images of him we see from others’ perspectives. This conclusion sheds new light on the novel, foregrounding Shelley’s unique layering of narrative perspectives and its importance for the depiction of character.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Your essay’s conclusion should contain:

  • A rephrased version of your overall thesis
  • A brief review of the key points you made in the main body
  • An indication of why your argument matters

The conclusion may also reflect on the broader implications of your argument, showing how your ideas could applied to other contexts or debates.

For a stronger conclusion paragraph, avoid including:

  • Important evidence or analysis that wasn’t mentioned in the main body
  • Generic concluding phrases (e.g. “In conclusion…”)
  • Weak statements that undermine your argument (e.g. “There are good points on both sides of this issue.”)

Your conclusion should leave the reader with a strong, decisive impression of your work.

The conclusion paragraph of an essay is usually shorter than the introduction . As a rule, it shouldn’t take up more than 10–15% of the text.

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McCombes, S. (2023, July 23). How to Conclude an Essay | Interactive Example. Scribbr. Retrieved February 19, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/conclusion/

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 Academic Conclusion

A conclusion is often separated into three key parts: A thesis, a summary of main ideas and a future focus (recommendation, prediction, solution).

Conclusion video

A short 6-minute video on how to write an academic conclusion. A basic 3-part conclusion structure and example paragraph.

The basic structure of a conclusion

conclusion structure

An example: a model conclusion

This image highlights the three parts of a conclusion: the thesis, the summary and a future prediction.

Conclusion example

Example phrases

These phrases will help you to construct your paragraph clearly.

Conclusions:

In conclusion,, to conclude,, recommendation  / suggestion:, the evidence suggests that …, therefore, it is recommended that … /, governments should…., the findings of this study suggest that …, prediction:  , one prediction is that…, if this continues, it could lead to…, an implication of this is the possibility that …, there is, therefore, a definite need for ……, there are a number of important changes which need to be made…, another important practical implication is that …, m ore conclusion phrases : click here, conclusion lesson, terms & conditions of use, conclusions – the basics.

This is  a great lesson to introduce and practice writing conclusions. It begins with identifying key  components of a  conclusion, then offers valuable writing practice of summarising key points, restating a thesis and creating ideas for a future focus. It finishes with using an essay outline to write a whole conclusion. ( Example )   Time: 180mins     Level *** ** [ B1/B2/C1] TEACHER MEMBERSHIP  / INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP

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Introductions: how to write an academic introduction, this lesson / worksheet presents the key sections to an academic introduction. it then focuses on highlighting those key sections in three model introductions with particular attention to the thesis (question / topics / stance) and finally finishes with writing an introduction using a range of titles.  example   level: ** *** [b1/b2/c1]   teacher membership  / institutional membership.

Webpage link: Introductions

Thesis Statements: How to write a thesis statement

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Basic Paragraph analysis:  corporate social responsibility (CSR)

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One of the most common questions we receive at the Writing Center is “what am I supposed to do in my conclusion?” This is a difficult question to answer because there’s no one right answer to what belongs in a conclusion. How you conclude your paper will depend on where you started—and where you traveled. It will also depend on the conventions and expectations of the discipline in which you are writing. For example, while the conclusion to a STEM paper could focus on questions for further study, the conclusion of a literature paper could include a quotation from your central text that can now be understood differently in light of what has been discussed in the paper. You should consult your instructor about expectations for conclusions in a particular discipline.

With that in mind, here are some general guidelines you might find helpful to use as you think about your conclusion.  

Begin with the “what”  

In a short paper—even a research paper—you don’t need to provide an exhaustive summary as part of your conclusion. But you do need to make some kind of transition between your final body paragraph and your concluding paragraph. This may come in the form of a few sentences of summary. Or it may come in the form of a sentence that brings your readers back to your thesis or main idea and reminds your readers where you began and how far you have traveled.

So, for example, in a paper about the relationship between ADHD and rejection sensitivity, Vanessa Roser begins by introducing readers to the fact that researchers have studied the relationship between the two conditions and then provides her explanation of that relationship. Here’s her thesis: “While socialization may indeed be an important factor in RS, I argue that individuals with ADHD may also possess a neurological predisposition to RS that is exacerbated by the differing executive and emotional regulation characteristic of ADHD.”

In her final paragraph, Roser reminds us of where she started by echoing her thesis: “This literature demonstrates that, as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Highlight the “so what”  

At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what’s at stake—why they should care about the argument you’re making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context.

In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the “behavioral mediation hypothesis.”

She writes, “as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Leave your readers with the “now what”  

After the “what” and the “so what,” you should leave your reader with some final thoughts. If you have written a strong introduction, your readers will know why you have been arguing what you have been arguing—and why they should care. And if you’ve made a good case for your thesis, then your readers should be in a position to see things in a new way, understand new questions, or be ready for something that they weren’t ready for before they read your paper.

In her conclusion, Roser offers two “now what” statements. First, she explains that it is important to recognize that the flawed behavioral mediation hypothesis “seems to place a degree of fault on the individual. It implies that individuals with ADHD must have elicited such frequent or intense rejection by virtue of their inadequate social skills, erasing the possibility that they may simply possess a natural sensitivity to emotion.” She then highlights the broader implications for treatment of people with ADHD, noting that recognizing the actual connection between rejection sensitivity and ADHD “has profound implications for understanding how individuals with ADHD might best be treated in educational settings, by counselors, family, peers, or even society as a whole.”

To find your own “now what” for your essay’s conclusion, try asking yourself these questions:

  • What can my readers now understand, see in a new light, or grapple with that they would not have understood in the same way before reading my paper? Are we a step closer to understanding a larger phenomenon or to understanding why what was at stake is so important?  
  • What questions can I now raise that would not have made sense at the beginning of my paper? Questions for further research? Other ways that this topic could be approached?  
  • Are there other applications for my research? Could my questions be asked about different data in a different context? Could I use my methods to answer a different question?  
  • What action should be taken in light of this argument? What action do I predict will be taken or could lead to a solution?  
  • What larger context might my argument be a part of?  

What to avoid in your conclusion  

  • a complete restatement of all that you have said in your paper.  
  • a substantial counterargument that you do not have space to refute; you should introduce counterarguments before your conclusion.  
  • an apology for what you have not said. If you need to explain the scope of your paper, you should do this sooner—but don’t apologize for what you have not discussed in your paper.  
  • fake transitions like “in conclusion” that are followed by sentences that aren’t actually conclusions. (“In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is correct.”)
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“Pay adequate attention to the conclusion.” Kathleen McMillan & Jonathan Weyers,  How to Write Essays & Assignments

Conclusions are often overlooked, cursory and written last minute. If this sounds familiar then it's time to change and give your conclusions some much needed attention. Your conclusion is the whole point of your essay. All the other parts of the essay should have been leading your reader on an inevitable journey towards your conclusion. So make it count and finish your essay in style.

Know where you are going

Too many students focus their essays on content rather than argument. This means they pay too much attention to the main body without considering where it is leading. It can be a good idea to write a draft conclusion before  you write your main body. It is a lot easier to plan a journey when you know your destination! 

It should only be a draft however, as quite often the writing process itself can help you develop your argument and you may feel your conclusion needs adapting accordingly.

What it should include

A great conclusion should include:

link icon

A clear link back to the question . This is usually the first thing you do in a conclusion and it shows that you have (hopefully) answered it.

icon - lightbulb in a point marker

A sentence or two that summarise(s) your main argument but in a bit more detail than you gave in your introduction.

idea with points leading to it

A series of supporting sentences that basically reiterate the main point of each of your paragraphs but show how they relate to each other and lead you to the position you have taken. Constantly ask yourself "So what?" "Why should anyone care?" and answer these questions for each of the points you make in your conclusion.

icon - exclamation mark

A final sentence that states why your ideas are important to the wider subject area . Where the introduction goes from general to specific, the conclusion needs to go from specific back out to general.

What it should not  include

Try to avoid including the following in your conclusion. Remember your conclusion should be entirely predictable. The reader wants no surprises.

icon - lightbulb crossed out

Any new ideas . If an idea is worth including, put it in the main body. You do not need to include citations in your conclusion if you have already used them earlier and are just reiterating your point.

sad face

A change of style i.e. being more emotional or sentimental than the rest of the essay. Keep it straightforward, explanatory and clear.

rubbish bin

Overused phrases like: “in conclusion”; “in summary”; “as shown in this essay”. Consign these to the rubbish bin!

Here are some alternatives, there are many more:

  • The x main points presented here emphasise the importance of...
  • The [insert something relevant] outlined above indicate that ...
  • By showing the connections between x, y and z, it has been argued here that ...

Maximise marks

Remember, your conclusion is the last thing your reader (marker!) will read. Spending a little care on it will leave her/him absolutely sure that you have answered the question and you will definitely receive a higher mark than if your conclusion was a quickly written afterthought.

Your conclusion should be around 10% of your word count. There is never a situation where sacrificing words in your conclusion will benefit your essay.

The 5Cs conclusion method: (spot the typo on this video)

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  • 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

academic essay conclusion phrases

To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. You could make a great point, but if it’s not intelligently articulated, you almost needn’t have bothered.

Developing the language skills to build an argument and to write persuasively is crucial if you’re to write outstanding essays every time. In this article, we’re going to equip you with the words and phrases you need to write a top-notch essay, along with examples of how to utilise them.

It’s by no means an exhaustive list, and there will often be other ways of using the words and phrases we describe that we won’t have room to include, but there should be more than enough below to help you make an instant improvement to your essay-writing skills.

This article is suitable for native English speakers and those who are  learning English at our Oxford Summer School or San Francisco Summer School and are just taking their first steps into essay writing.

General explaining

Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points.

1. In order to

Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.”

2. In other words

Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. In other words, they live on the land and in the water.”

3. To put it another way

Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. To put it another way, they will die without the sun.”

4. That is to say

Usage: “That is” and “that is to say” can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: “Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.”

5. To that end

Usage: Use “to that end” or “to this end” in a similar way to “in order to” or “so”. Example: “Zoologists have long sought to understand how animals communicate with each other. To that end, a new study has been launched that looks at elephant sounds and their possible meanings.”

Adding additional information to support a point

Students often make the mistake of using synonyms of “and” each time they want to add further information in support of a point they’re making, or to build an argument . Here are some cleverer ways of doing this.

6. Moreover

Usage: Employ “moreover” at the start of a sentence to add extra information in support of a point you’re making. Example: “Moreover, the results of a recent piece of research provide compelling evidence in support of…”

7. Furthermore

Usage:This is also generally used at the start of a sentence, to add extra information. Example: “Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that…”

8. What’s more

Usage: This is used in the same way as “moreover” and “furthermore”. Example: “What’s more, this isn’t the only evidence that supports this hypothesis.”

9. Likewise

Usage: Use “likewise” when you want to talk about something that agrees with what you’ve just mentioned. Example: “Scholar A believes X. Likewise, Scholar B argues compellingly in favour of this point of view.”

10. Similarly

Usage: Use “similarly” in the same way as “likewise”. Example: “Audiences at the time reacted with shock to Beethoven’s new work, because it was very different to what they were used to. Similarly, we have a tendency to react with surprise to the unfamiliar.”

11. Another key thing to remember

Usage: Use the phrase “another key point to remember” or “another key fact to remember” to introduce additional facts without using the word “also”. Example: “As a Romantic, Blake was a proponent of a closer relationship between humans and nature. Another key point to remember is that Blake was writing during the Industrial Revolution, which had a major impact on the world around him.”

12. As well as

Usage: Use “as well as” instead of “also” or “and”. Example: “Scholar A argued that this was due to X, as well as Y.”

13. Not only… but also

Usage: This wording is used to add an extra piece of information, often something that’s in some way more surprising or unexpected than the first piece of information. Example: “Not only did Edmund Hillary have the honour of being the first to reach the summit of Everest, but he was also appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

14. Coupled with

Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Example: “Coupled with the literary evidence, the statistics paint a compelling view of…”

15. Firstly, secondly, thirdly…

Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Example: “There are many points in support of this view. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z.

16. Not to mention/to say nothing of

Usage: “Not to mention” and “to say nothing of” can be used to add extra information with a bit of emphasis. Example: “The war caused unprecedented suffering to millions of people, not to mention its impact on the country’s economy.”

Words and phrases for demonstrating contrast

When you’re developing an argument, you will often need to present contrasting or opposing opinions or evidence – “it could show this, but it could also show this”, or “X says this, but Y disagrees”. This section covers words you can use instead of the “but” in these examples, to make your writing sound more intelligent and interesting.

17. However

Usage: Use “however” to introduce a point that disagrees with what you’ve just said. Example: “Scholar A thinks this. However, Scholar B reached a different conclusion.”

18. On the other hand

Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting interpretation of the same piece of evidence, a different piece of evidence that suggests something else, or an opposing opinion. Example: “The historical evidence appears to suggest a clear-cut situation. On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day.”

19. Having said that

Usage: Used in a similar manner to “on the other hand” or “but”. Example: “The historians are unanimous in telling us X, an agreement that suggests that this version of events must be an accurate account. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story.”

20. By contrast/in comparison

Usage: Use “by contrast” or “in comparison” when you’re comparing and contrasting pieces of evidence. Example: “Scholar A’s opinion, then, is based on insufficient evidence. By contrast, Scholar B’s opinion seems more plausible.”

21. Then again

Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. Example: “Writer A asserts that this was the reason for what happened. Then again, it’s possible that he was being paid to say this.”

22. That said

Usage: This is used in the same way as “then again”. Example: “The evidence ostensibly appears to point to this conclusion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best.”

Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Example: “Much of scholarship has focused on this evidence. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation.”

Adding a proviso or acknowledging reservations

Sometimes, you may need to acknowledge a shortfalling in a piece of evidence, or add a proviso. Here are some ways of doing so.

24. Despite this

Usage: Use “despite this” or “in spite of this” when you want to outline a point that stands regardless of a shortfalling in the evidence. Example: “The sample size was small, but the results were important despite this.”

25. With this in mind

Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Example: “We’ve seen that the methods used in the 19th century study did not always live up to the rigorous standards expected in scientific research today, which makes it difficult to draw definite conclusions. With this in mind, let’s look at a more recent study to see how the results compare.”

26. Provided that

Usage: This means “on condition that”. You can also say “providing that” or just “providing” to mean the same thing. Example: “We may use this as evidence to support our argument, provided that we bear in mind the limitations of the methods used to obtain it.”

27. In view of/in light of

Usage: These phrases are used when something has shed light on something else. Example: “In light of the evidence from the 2013 study, we have a better understanding of…”

28. Nonetheless

Usage: This is similar to “despite this”. Example: “The study had its limitations, but it was nonetheless groundbreaking for its day.”

29. Nevertheless

Usage: This is the same as “nonetheless”. Example: “The study was flawed, but it was important nevertheless.”

30. Notwithstanding

Usage: This is another way of saying “nonetheless”. Example: “Notwithstanding the limitations of the methodology used, it was an important study in the development of how we view the workings of the human mind.”

Giving examples

Good essays always back up points with examples, but it’s going to get boring if you use the expression “for example” every time. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing.

31. For instance

Example: “Some birds migrate to avoid harsher winter climates. Swallows, for instance, leave the UK in early winter and fly south…”

32. To give an illustration

Example: “To give an illustration of what I mean, let’s look at the case of…”

Signifying importance

When you want to demonstrate that a point is particularly important, there are several ways of highlighting it as such.

33. Significantly

Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Example: “Significantly, Tacitus omits to tell us the kind of gossip prevalent in Suetonius’ accounts of the same period.”

34. Notably

Usage: This can be used to mean “significantly” (as above), and it can also be used interchangeably with “in particular” (the example below demonstrates the first of these ways of using it). Example: “Actual figures are notably absent from Scholar A’s analysis.”

35. Importantly

Usage: Use “importantly” interchangeably with “significantly”. Example: “Importantly, Scholar A was being employed by X when he wrote this work, and was presumably therefore under pressure to portray the situation more favourably than he perhaps might otherwise have done.”

Summarising

You’ve almost made it to the end of the essay, but your work isn’t over yet. You need to end by wrapping up everything you’ve talked about, showing that you’ve considered the arguments on both sides and reached the most likely conclusion. Here are some words and phrases to help you.

36. In conclusion

Usage: Typically used to introduce the concluding paragraph or sentence of an essay, summarising what you’ve discussed in a broad overview. Example: “In conclusion, the evidence points almost exclusively to Argument A.”

37. Above all

Usage: Used to signify what you believe to be the most significant point, and the main takeaway from the essay. Example: “Above all, it seems pertinent to remember that…”

38. Persuasive

Usage: This is a useful word to use when summarising which argument you find most convincing. Example: “Scholar A’s point – that Constanze Mozart was motivated by financial gain – seems to me to be the most persuasive argument for her actions following Mozart’s death.”

39. Compelling

Usage: Use in the same way as “persuasive” above. Example: “The most compelling argument is presented by Scholar A.”

40. All things considered

Usage: This means “taking everything into account”. Example: “All things considered, it seems reasonable to assume that…”

How many of these words and phrases will you get into your next essay? And are any of your favourite essay terms missing from our list? Let us know in the comments below, or get in touch here to find out more about courses that can help you with your essays.

At Oxford Royale Academy, we offer a number of  summer school courses for young people who are keen to improve their essay writing skills. Click here to apply for one of our courses today, including law , business , medicine  and engineering .

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academic essay conclusion phrases

Academic Essay: A How-To Guide

academic essay conclusion phrases

Did you know that in a single academic semester, an average college student can write enough words to fill a 500-page novel? To put it in perspective, that's roughly 125,000 to 150,000 words of essays, research papers, and other written assignments. It's an astounding amount of content, and it underscores the significance of mastering the art of scholarly essay writing. Whether you're a seasoned scholar or just starting your academic journey, understanding the intricacies of composing a well-structured, well-researched essay is essential.

Short Description

Delve into the intricate world of writing an academic essay with our all-encompassing guide. We'll take you on a journey through the various types of scholarly composition, demystify the essay writing process, and provide valuable insights into proper formatting. You'll also find practical examples to inspire your own work and step-by-step how-to guides to ensure your essays stand out. Whether you're a seasoned student or just starting your academic adventure, this resource will be your compass for success in the realm of scholarly endeavors.

What Is an Academic Essay

In a nutshell, an academic essay is a structured form of writing students face in school, college, and university as a part of their curricula. The most common purposes of such writing are to either present some new pieces of information or to use existing facts and knowledge to deliver specific ideas. This type of assignment allows students to demonstrate their knowledge and creativity and encourages them to develop their ideas to communicate a message.

Compared to other types of academic writing, essays are usually shorter in length and present the authors’ opinions to support their arguments. Here are some key features of an academic essay for you to keep in mind:

  • Conciseness — as a rule, essays are short; the length of such papers range from 200 to 500 words.
  • Topic — due to their short lengths, a perfect topic for an essay should be narrowed-down and not too broad.
  • Well-structured text — although essays can be considered as one of the least formal types of writing, they still need to have a solid structure and follow the proper academic paper format.
  • Clear central idea — every academic essay should deliver a specific point that should be clear and powerful (i.e. thesis statement).
  • Personal motivation — unlike other types of writing, essays often imply that their authors are personally interested in the subjects they are discussing.
  • Supporting facts, evidence, and examples — although essays may present an author’s personal beliefs and ideas, they should also provide arguments that support those ideas.

It helps to develop your academic writing skills early—as they are skills you will carry forward throughout your studies and lifetime. People who are good at writing academic essays also tend to be able to articulate themselves more clearly, and tend to have more confidence when speaking.

To fully understand how and when to use an academic essay, our  will describe the main types of them for you.

Elevate your academic performance with EssayPro. Our experts are here to help you craft compelling academic essays that stand out. With our support, you can confidently tackle any topic and impress your professors with your insight and clarity.

academic essay order

Academic Essay Example

Here are the perfect academic essay examples from our research paper writer .

Academic Essay Topics

In our quest to engage and challenge the academic community, we've curated a list of unique essay topics. These topics are meticulously chosen to incite critical thinking, and reflect on the intertwining of traditional theories with modern realities. From exploring the ethical dimensions of AI in healthcare to delving into the socioeconomic aspects of upcycling trends, these topics are a gateway to insightful discussions and a profound understanding of the evolving world around us.

  • The Dynamics of Human-AI Relationships: A Look into the Future.
  • The Revival of Ancient Herbal Remedies in Modern Medicine.
  • Bridging Historical Rifts: An Analysis of Modern Diplomacy Efforts.
  • The Role of Urban Green Spaces in Promoting Mental Health.
  • The Impact of Classical Literature on Modern Pop Culture.
  • The Future of Cybersecurity: Preparing for Quantum Computing Threats.
  • The Cultural Significance of Culinary Traditions in Nation Building.
  • The Influence of Music on Cognitive Performance.
  • The Changing Landscape of Privacy in the Digital Age.
  • The Socioeconomic Factors Contributing to Vaccine Hesitancy.
  • The Intersection of Modern Technology and Ancient Philosophies.
  • Evolving Linguistic Norms: The Impact of Social Media on Language.
  • The Psychological Effects of Color in Consumer Behavior.
  • Ethical Implications of AI in Modern Healthcare.
  • Urban Planning in Post-Pandemic World: Lessons and Preparations.
  • The Role of Art Therapy in Managing Chronic Stress.
  • The Influence of Space Exploration on Earth's Technological Advancements.
  • The Future of Biodegradable Plastics: A Sustainable Alternative?
  • A Socioeconomic Analysis of Upcycling Trends.
  • The Ethical Dilemmas of Genetic Engineering in Agriculture.

Ready to Transform Essay Woes into Academic Triumphs?

Let us take you on an essay-writing adventure where brilliance knows no bounds!

Types of Academic Writing

The process of writing an essay comes in various forms, each with its unique style and purpose. Understanding these types can be essential for tailoring your writing to suit the specific requirements of your assignments. Here, our essay writer service will explore some of the most common types of academic writing:

types of academic writing

  • Expository Writing : This type of writing is all about explaining and providing information. In expository essays, your goal is to inform your reader about a specific topic or concept. For example, if you were writing an expository essay about climate change, you would present facts and data to inform your reader about the issue's causes and effects.
  • Persuasive Writing : Persuasive writing aims to convince the reader of a particular point of view or argument. In a persuasive essay, you would use logical reasoning, evidence, and well-structured arguments to persuade your audience. For instance, an essay advocating for stricter environmental regulations would be a persuasive piece.
  • Descriptive Writing : In descriptive writing, your task is to create a vivid picture with words. You want the reader to feel like they are experiencing the subject firsthand. Imagine writing a descriptive essay about a picturesque countryside scene; you would use colorful language and sensory details to transport your reader there.
  • Narrative Writing : Narrative essays are like storytelling. They often recount personal experiences, anecdotes, or narratives. For example, you might write a narrative essay about a life-changing event or your journey to a foreign country.
  • Analytical Writing : Analytical writing involves breaking down complex ideas or issues into smaller components and then examining them critically. When analyzing a piece of literature in an essay, you would deconstruct the text, explore its themes, characters, and literary devices, and provide insights into the author's intentions.
  • Research Papers : Research papers are a hallmark of academic writing. They require you to investigate a topic thoroughly, gather data, and present your findings. Whether it's a scientific research paper, a history paper, or a social science study, research papers demand rigorous research and precise citation of sources.
  • Literature Reviews : These are common in humanities and social sciences. A literature review involves summarizing and critically evaluating existing research on a specific topic. It's an essential component of academic research, allowing you to place your work within the broader context of scholarly conversation.

Understanding the Essay Writing Process

The journey of understanding how to write an academic essay is characterized by distinct stages: preparation, writing, and revisions. The nature of this journey, however, is like a versatile chameleon, ever-adapting to the unique demands of each essay type.

Let's consider the scenario of a high school student tasked with writing a five-paragraph expository essay. In this case, the emphasis predominantly falls on the writing stage. Given the straightforward prompt, the student's primary focus lies in structuring and articulating their thoughts effectively within the constraints of these paragraphs. The goal is to convey information clearly, maintaining a well-organized and engaging narrative.

Now, imagine a college-level argumentative essay. Here, the bulk of your efforts shift to the preparation stage. Before a single word is written, a rigorous exploration of the essay topics is imperative. This involves extensive research, diving deep into scholarly articles, dissecting data, and developing a compelling argument. A strong thesis, underpinned by a wealth of evidence and nuanced insights, becomes the keystone of your essay.

The revising stage, a constant companion in this journey, maintains its significance across all essay types. It's during revision that you refine and perfect your work, harmonizing your arguments and ensuring the essay's overall cohesion. At this stage, you become the editor, refining grammar, enhancing clarity, and optimizing the essay's structure.

academic essay conclusion phrases

Setting the Stage for Essay Writing Success

The process of writing an academic essay typically unfolds in the following manner:

  • Receiving the Assignment : Your essay journey commences when your instructor or professor hands out the assignment prompt. This prompt serves as your roadmap, detailing the essay's topic, length, and any specific requirements. It's crucial to read this prompt attentively, ensuring you comprehend the expectations.
  • Understanding the Task : Once you have the assignment prompt in hand, take the time to understand it fully. Analyze the purpose of the essay. Is it meant to inform, persuade, analyze, or narrate? Determine the target audience, whether it's your instructor, peers, or a broader readership. This understanding will guide your approach to the essay.
  • Research and Gathering Information : After grasping the assignment's main idea, it's time to research and collect information. Depending on the topic and type of essay, this might involve library research, online searches, or fieldwork. The quality and quantity of your research will influence the depth and credibility of your essay.
  • Developing a Thesis : With the knowledge you've acquired, create a clear and concise thesis statement. This statement encapsulates the main argument or perspective you will present in your essay. It serves as the foundation upon which your essay will be built.
  • Planning and Outlining : Before diving into the actual writing, it's essential to create your essay outline. This step helps you organize your thoughts and ideas, ensuring a logical and coherent structure. Consider the essay's introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion, and decide on the points you will address in each section.

Academic Essay Format

The essay format is your framework for presenting ideas, but it doesn't have to stifle your creativity or individuality. Here's a practical look at the academic essay format example from a unique perspective:

academic essay format

  • Introduction - Piquing Interest : Use your introduction as a tool to pique your reader's interest. Rather than simply stating your thesis, start with a surprising fact, a relevant question, or a brief story. Engaging your reader from the outset can make your essay more captivating.
  • Body Paragraphs - Building a Logical Flow : Consider your body paragraphs as stepping stones in a logical progression. Each paragraph should naturally lead to the next, creating a seamless flow of ideas. Ensure that your points connect coherently, making your essay easy to follow.
  • Evidence and Analysis - Supporting Your Claims : When including evidence, don't just drop quotes or data into your essay. Instead, think of them as puzzle pieces that need critical thinking skills for explanation and integration. Analyze how the evidence supports your argument, providing context and clarity for your reader.
  • Transitions - Smooth Connections : Utilize transitional words and phrases to guide your reader through your essay. These simple elements, like 'Furthermore,' 'In contrast,' or 'Conversely,' can significantly enhance the readability and comprehension of your essay.
  • Conclusion - Recap and Implication : Your conclusion should summarize your main points, restating your thesis. However, take it a step further by highlighting the broader implications of your argument. What do your findings suggest or inspire the reader to consider? This adds depth to your conclusion.
  • Formatting - Clear and Consistent : Follow formatting guidelines diligently. Consistency in font, margins, and citation style reflects your attention to detail and respect for academic standards.

How to Write an Academic Essay: Steps and Techniques

academic essay conclusion phrases

Crafting a Captivating Essay Introduction

The introduction of your academic essay serves as the portal through which your reader enters the realm of your ideas. Let's understand how to write an essay introduction by considering these four dynamic elements:

Engage Your Reader

Start with a thought-provoking question that sparks curiosity. For instance, in an essay about climate change, you might begin with, 'What if I told you that a single-degree change in global temperature could alter the course of humanity's future?' When learning how to write a hook for an essay , questions can be powerful entry points because they create an immediate sense of intrigue. Readers are drawn into your essay in search of answers, setting the stage for exploration.

Offer Context for Your Topic

Rather than a mere factual backdrop, transport your reader to a historical moment or an evocative setting related to your topic. For example, when discussing the history of the Eiffel Tower in an architecture essay, you could begin with, 'Imagine strolling the cobblestone streets of 19th-century Paris, where a colossal iron structure was emerging from the ground, destined to become a global icon.' Whether you write an essay yourself or use the option to buy a dissertation , remember that introducing background information immerses your reader in the context, making them feel like they've stepped back in time or been transported to a specific place.

Introduce Your Thesis Statement

Present your thesis statement with an air of revelation, as if unveiling a well-kept secret. In an essay about the impact of technology on privacy, you might say, 'Hidden in the digital shadows, a critical truth emerges: our privacy is slipping away, pixel by pixel, keystroke by keystroke.' Make it sound like a literary discovery, something that's been hidden and is now about to be revealed. This imbues it with a sense of anticipation.

Outline Your Essay's Structure

Instead of merely outlining your essay's structure, craft it like a guidebook for an adventure. Imagine your essay as a journey through uncharted territory. Present your essay's sections or main points as thrilling destinations your reader is about to explore. For instance, if your essay is about the cultural impact of a famous novel, you could say, 'Our literary expedition will begin in the author's biographical world, then traverse the novel's plot twists, and finally, unravel the web of its influence on modern culture.'

Developing the Main Body

The main body is where your ideas take shape while understanding how to write an academic essay, and it's crucial to approach this section thoughtfully. Here's how to tackle two key elements:

Exploring the Body Text's Length

The length of your body text should align with the complexity of your topic and the depth of exploration required. For instance, consider a historical analysis essay on the causes of World War I. This topic is multifaceted, requiring in-depth coverage. In such a case, it's appropriate to dedicate several pages to thoroughly examine the various factors contributing to the war. On the other hand, in a concise argumentative essay about a specific policy issue, like healthcare reform, brevity can be the key to keeping your reader engaged. In this instance, you might aim for a clear, persuasive argument within a few pages. The key is to tailor the length to your topic, ensuring you provide sufficient evidence and analysis without unnecessary elaboration.

Crafting Effective Paragraphs

Each paragraph in the main body should be a self-contained unit that contributes to your overall argument. Consider, for example, an essay on climate change.

In a paragraph discussing the consequences of rising global temperatures, you could begin with a topic sentence like, 'Rising temperatures have far-reaching effects on ecosystems.' Next, present evidence in the form of data and examples, such as statistics on melting polar ice caps and the impact on polar bear populations. Follow this with analysis, explaining the significance of these consequences for the environment.

Ensure that your ideas flow logically from one paragraph to the next, creating a seamless and coherent narrative. Vary the length and structure of your paragraphs to add dynamic variation to your essay. For instance, in a literary analysis, a short, impactful paragraph may be used to emphasize a critical point, while longer paragraphs could delve into complex themes or explore multiple aspects of your argument. By thoughtfully exploring the body text's length and crafting effective paragraphs, you create a main body that is both engaging and informative, tailored to the unique requirements of your academic essay writing.

Concluding Your Essay

The conclusion of your essay serves as the grand finale, leaving a lasting impression on your reader. However, it's not just a place to restate your thesis; it's an opportunity to add depth and resonance to your essay. Here's how to approach it effectively:

  • Summarize Your Main Points with a Twist : Summarize the key points you've made throughout your essay, but do it with a twist. Instead of merely restating what you've already said, provide a fresh perspective or a thought-provoking insight.
  • Revisit Your Thesis Statement : Bring your essay full circle by revisiting your thesis statement. Remind your reader of the central argument, but do it in a way that emphasizes its significance.
  • Provide a Sense of Closure : The conclusion should provide a sense of closure to your essay. Like the final chapter of a captivating story, it should leave your reader with a sense of completion. Avoid introducing new ideas or even new persuasive essay topics in this section; instead, focus on the culmination of your existing points.
  • Inspire Thought or Action : Go beyond summarization and inspire thought or action. Invite your reader to reflect on the implications of your essay or consider its relevance in a broader context. This can make your essay more impactful and thought-provoking.

Refining Your Academic Essay Through Editing

Once you've penned your final words, the journey is far from over. Editing is a crucial step in the essay writing process, much like it is while learning how to write a descriptive essay . It's where you refine your work to its polished best. Here's how to approach it:

  • Start by proofreading your essay for clarity and errors. Check for grammar, punctuation, and spelling mistakes.
  • Examine the overall structure of your essay. Is it organized logically? Are the paragraphs well-structured? Does the essay have a clear flow from the introduction to the conclusion?
  • Ensure that you've cited your sources correctly and compiled your references or bibliography according to the required citation style, such as APA, MLA, or Chicago.
  • Trim unnecessary words and phrases to make your writing more concise. Check for wordiness and make sure your vocabulary is precise and appropriate for an academic audience.

In this comprehensive guide, we've covered the essential elements of crafting an academic essay, from honing your writing skills to capturing the reader's attention, from the essay's inception to achieving an A+ finish. Remember that mastering the art of essay writing is a valuable skill. It's a process that involves structure, style, and substance, and it serves as your gateway to sharing your ideas effectively. Regardless of your level of experience, this guide is designed to equip you with the tools you need to excel in your essay-writing endeavors!

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Essay conclusion | example words & phrases.

Do you know what people remember most from your essay or speech? It is the beginning and the conclusion.

Our professionals know how to make your report catchy. One can learn helpful tips from our mature writers or order a ready-made captivating text with a strong conclusion.

Why does the conclusion matter?

The last paragraph reflects your ability to select the most important things from the whole flow of information and title . This abstract ends the text; thus, it makes the final impression.

We know from experience that the last phrase forms sort of aftertaste. Rest assured that it will be associated with your paper. So, pay enough attention to your closing words.

Good conclusion for your essay | Tips from experts

A conclusion is a final push to your brilliant essay. You have already spent so many efforts to come up with original ideas, find strong facts, and explain the core points of your project.

Now it is time to sum up your thoughts and reveal key findings. Do not give it up since you are one step away from success. If you feel absolutely exhausted at this stage, turn to our specialists for help.

For those who feel power and enthusiasm to write an essay till the last point, we have selected effective recommendations.

A magic formula to write a conclusion for an essay

For more than ten years of successful writing experience, we have written an unlimited number of conclusions for essays. We have found that the final paragraph should be composed according to the rule.

1. Short and to the point

The final part of the essay is definitely not for long reflections and new suggestions. The point is to recap all the information you have presented above. Do not overload your readers.

2. Memorable

Use eye-catching phrases to conclude your essay. You can reach this goal by selecting the most suitable words.

3. Valuable

The sense of the conclusion boils down to summarizing and, what is more important, analyzing all the above information. Herein lies its value for a reader.

A strong conclusion leaves a lasting impression on the reader. It is what shows the best of your essay.

Essay conclusions: the ultimate list of pro tips

We want to share our experience and, thus, provide this guidance on effective endings for your high school and college essays. Inspiration and in-depth knowledge enable us to write a conclusion in one breath. But what if a muse does not come? Then, one can try some routine ways. Here we emphasize practical advice.

1. Make a list of the core ideas presented in the main part

It will help you concentrate attention around them for summing up. Meantime, having this outline in front of eyes, you avoid repeating the same wordings.

2. Reread the introduction

The conclusion must follow from the first part of the paper. Start with a transition sentence connecting the initial idea to your closing thoughts.

3. Rewrite the main thoughts

Rephrase wordings to avoid duplication. Or ask our rewriter to do it https://shinyessays.com/blog/essay-rewriter-for-hire . Wrapping up is essential for this part of the report. Meantime, it cannot be an end in itself.  A conclusion should be much more than a summary.

4. Look one more time at your final abstract

Cross out new arguments and facts from it.

5. “Dig deeper”

What is the sense of my essay? What is my central message? Why is it helpful? What is the value of my suggestions for a reader (field of science, humankind, in general...) Ask yourself similar questions to synthesize and highlight key points of your project.  A professor expects to see a logical flow of thoughts related to each other in your conclusion.

6. Add confidence

If you need a powerful conclusion, eliminate all the doubts from this paragraph. Avoid words: “probably,” “maybe,” “I am not sure,” etc.

7. Give food for thought

If the format of the essay allows, end it on a provocative note. A rhetorical question is remembered since it leaves a reader alone with his/her thoughts.

Are there any alternatives to conclusions?

It happens that an essay has no conclusion in the traditional sense. Yes, sometimes, professors do not require to end a paper according to academic standards. So, you are free to come up with new ideas.

Here are some prompts for inspiration and practical use.

  • Describe only implications of the core issue.
  • Speculate on the further course of events.
  • Pose an unexpected question to the reader. (Still it, should be relevant to the topic.)
  • Go from the particular to the general. Show how the object of your study influences the whole picture.

Rules for writing conclusions may vary depending on the type of the essay. Let’s figure it out in detail.

What is the best conclusion for a critical essay?

A critical essay is a matter of analysis, firstly. Students might associate it with a negative review (critique), yet, it’s not like that. The sense is to study a particular object and give an objective evaluation. Therefore, the final part of these papers must contain the core findings made during this examination.

Some ideas on how to write it:

  • put it all together;
  • find stronger wordings to recap the main suggestions,
  • come up with a succinct phrase reflecting your discovery.

Conclusions for academic papers

Obviously, academic papers require a serious approach to writing. Educational institutions set their rules for composing essays, and their chapters, in particular. Students are restricted with these standards and have to operate within rigid frames. These may vary according to colleges and types of academic papers. Yet, we can reveal the most common of them.

In fact, you need to answer the following questions in a couple phrases.

  • What is the purpose of the paper?
  • What is the best way to prove your thesis statement?
  • Why is your academic paper worth reading? Demonstrate the importance of your insights.
  • Is there any value of your treatise for further research?

Conclusions that irritate

The truth is your teachers and professors read thousands of essays every year. They explain the rules of good conclusions and give practical recommendations. Still, some students go against these principles and common sense, in general.

Our assistants have selected phrases that may spoil the overall impression of your report. However, do take them as the only truth. You could have quite another college policy.

1. “In conclusion,” “the conclusion is...”

If you want to stand out among other multiple applicants and pupils, think about more interesting wording. Stop being Captain Obvious, look for new catchphrases, and get a well-earned A. 

2. “And now let’s talk about a new concept (event, phenomena, theme)...”

Wait, it is the conclusion, not a new chapter. Thus, do not give any new facts and explanations. The reader expects a summary but not a continuation or a beginning, which is even worse. Calculations, clarifications, statistics, and other arguments must be written in the main part.

3. “Look  at this issue from the new angle,” “I have just revealed that, ...”

Unexpected conclusions are good for fiction. An academic field does not appreciate such twists. They definitely need “spoilers” in the body of your paper.

4. “That’ all, folks…”

It’s not a good idea to cite Looney Tunes cartoons in essays for high schools or colleges. The same can be said about jargon and slang.

Here are some more variants on how to annoy a professor.

Typical mistakes in conclusions

We want you to avoid common misconceptions concerning the final paragraph. For this purpose, we have selected some of the most popular remarks from professors.

✓ It is too long

You need to monitor the proportions of this part. Obviously, the conclusion cannot be longer than the main part.

✓ Pupils start a new page to write it

The conclusion is the last part of an essay. It is not the same as a new chapter of a dissertation.

✓ The style of the conclusion differs from the manner of writing of the previous parts

Sometimes we witness this dissonance, and it really comes across as something weird. Your teacher might also think that another person wrote it.

Conclusion in an opinion essay

The purpose of the opinion essay is to express a personal point of view. One can take it as an opportunity to show individuality. Importantly, this principle must be reflected in the final paragraph.

Here is an abstract from an essay by an actor James Franco . He demonstrates his positive attitude to selfies and sums up thoughts in one beautiful abstract.

essay conclusion - example

Source: nytimes.com/2013/12/29/arts/the-meanings-of-the-selfie.html

Some hints from our authors

  • Do not change your attitude in the final part

It is not recommended to write sudden new views. You need to demonstrate a consistent piece of writing.

  • Formulate your viewpoint in one phrase

Learn to be concise. The conclusion is not for repeating the same thoughts that are presented in the body of the essay. What is even more important, it is not about overloading your readers with a bunch of information.

Show the uniqueness of your thoughts and reflections. Your fresh view is what professors will definitely appreciate.

A conclusion from “an essay about knowledge in 2020” (random example from our author):

“In fact, one needs to know only the basic things and principles. Yet, you need to understand much more. The sense is not to memorize encyclopedic data but to comprehend it. Your abilities are unlimited when you are good at observing, analyzing, and predicting.”

How to conclude a problem solution essay?

One clear answer is what a professor wants to read at the end of your problem solution essay. You can come up with various decisions, yet do not forget about a concise manner of the final abstract. Here are some of our variants from our specialists:

✓ reveal preventive measures;

✓ show well-known ways of fight against the issue;

✓ determine the most effective strategies;

✓ demonstrate the effectiveness of your solution;

✓ add your personal recommendations.

General phrases for an essay conclusion

There are numerous synonyms to a banal phrase “in conclusion.”  If you cannot find proper words for your final part, check out our hints.

  • by and large,

A little bit sophisticated :

  • unquestionably,
  • all things considered,
  • in view of all the above aspects,
  • in the final analysis.

Convincing:

  • most would agree that,
  • as a result of,
  • there is general agreement that,
  • the present findings confirm.

In case you need academic wordings:

  • The findings of this essay can be understood as…
  • The research leads to the following findings…
  • The results demonstrate...
  • These outcomes suggest that...

Parts of an essay conclusion

For your convenience, we present a classical structure of the essay conclusion. It could help you put thoughts together and finish your text quickly and efficiently.

1. So, how to start a conclusion?

Formulate the thesis using new words. It could be your first sentence.

2. The main part of the conclusion

“Squeeze” essential moments from the body of the essay.

3. The final concluding sentence

It is a place for the best “polished” thoughts and ideas.

Purposes of conclusions:

  • leave an aftertaste (it is not compulsory to end your essay on a positive note. It depends on the topic of the paper),
  • draw attention to the bottom line of the essay.

Things to avoid in conclusions:

  • new data on your topic,
  • long abstracts,
  • irrelevant information.

Strategies for writing conclusions

1. Three layers of “so-what?”

We know firsthand that “ So-what model ” of analysis is helpful for writing conclusions. The thing is to get to the root of the issue.Let’s consider an example. Say, you are working on an essay “The importance of education in 2020.” You need to answer three questions:

  • What is the core message of the report?

Education is extremely essential for students today.

You cannot get a dream job without a college degree.

Ignoring education, you deprive yourself of opportunities to succeed in life.

In fact, you need to question your takeaway and prove the point. Herein lies the sense of in-depth analysis that forms the basis of a well-considered essay.

2. Tie it to the introduction

A sense of completion is what your conclusion must leave. A reader has to find brief answers to questions posed at the beginning.

3. Analyze, but do not repeat

There is no value in duplicating the same thoughts at the end of the essay. Instead, you need to reveal cause and effect, provide an outlook, interpret the results from your angle. In doing so, you add value to your piece of writing.

4. Find a balance between emotions and rational suggestions

In most cases, sentimental phrases are not acceptable for academic writing. Still, sometimes you can draw emotional images to add sincerity.

Conclusion examples for inspiration

Have you read an essay by Angelina Jolie about so-called “wicked” women?

It is about female power and independence.

how to conclude an essay - example

Source: https://www.elle.com/culture/a28555952/angelina-jolie-maleficent-interview/

Expert opinion:

We really appreciate this article for revealing such acute matters. And the conclusion is written perfectly. What do we see here?

1. Summing. It is about the significance of a woman’s self-sufficiency and her active life position, since “there is nothing more attractive and enchanting.”

2. Catchphrase. We like this wording about the love of “wicked” women and, especially, of men who accept them. It comes across as a sincere message.

If you need a similar essay, you can order it from our team of skilled writers . 

George Orwell’s essay on an atomic bomb was the reason for numerous discussions all over the world back in the day.

essay by George Orwell

Source: https://orwell.ru/library/articles/ABomb/english/e_abomb

Expert’s opinion:

It is a classic example of a short-and-to-the-point conclusion. It concisely demonstrates the implications of the atomic bomb, which is a restriction of the savagery and establishing some semblance of peace.

What about your good old friends Shinyessays.com? We cannot share the conclusions we have written for clients due to the Privacy Policy. So, why not consider our pages?

good way to conclude your essay

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This conclusion does not contain banal words. Apparently “the bottom line” sounds better than “in conclusion.” One can find an answer to the question “Your services are good, so what?” Here we show obvious benefits you get: better grades and ratings.

conclude an essay with a question

As we see, attention is drawn to the academic level of services, which is the main thought of this post. The last question makes readers ponder on their wishes.

Send us your essay to get a review on your conclusion or order essay writing and related services on our website.

What is it all for?

We are sure this post will be helpful for you sooner or later. If you have read it till the end, you might become a “ guru of conclusions .” Having studied the above tips and examples, you can write the ending for your essay in a snap. If you are stuck with this assignment, our writing agency Shinyessays.com will do it with skill.

You might also like:

  • How to Write a Great Motivation Essay Paper
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  1. How To Write A Conclusion Statement For An Essay

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  1. Conclusions

  2. How to Write Introductions & Conclusions in IELTS Task 2

  3. Academic Essay: Conclusion

  4. Writing your Conclusion

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  6. Argumentative essay examples I Essay writing online

COMMENTS

  1. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis

  2. Academic Phrases for Writing Conclusion Section of a Research Paper

    1. Overall summary The paper concludes by arguing __ On this basis, we conclude that __ The authors concluded that __ is not confined to __ This allows the conclusion that __ The findings of this study can be understood as __ This may be considered a promising aspect of __ This may be considered a further validation of __

  3. Academic Phrasebank

    Academic Phrasebank / Writing Conclusions An enhanced and expanded version of PHRASEBANK is available in PDF or Kindle format: Writing conclusions Conclusions are shorter sections of academic texts which usually serve two functions.

  4. 39 Different Ways to Say 'In Conclusion' in an Essay (Rated)

    1. The Weight of the Evidence Suggests… My Rating: 10/10 Overview: This is a good concluding phrase for an evaluative essay where you need to compare two different positions on a topic then conclude by saying which one has more evidence behind it than the other.

  5. Academic Phrasebank

    Home Academic Phrasebank Home page The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological 'nuts and bolts' of writing organised according to the main sections of a research paper or dissertation (see the top menu ).

  6. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    The introduction to an academic essay will generally present an analytical question or problem and then offer an answer to that question (the thesis). ... • fake transitions like "in conclusion" that are followed by sentences that aren't actually conclusions. ("In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is ...

  7. Academic Conclusion

    Solutions: There is, therefore, a definite need for …… There are a number of important changes which need to be made… Another important practical implication is that … M ore conclusion phrases: click here Conclusion lesson Terms & Conditions of Use Conclusions - the basics This is a great lesson to introduce and practice writing conclusions.

  8. Conclusions

    You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context. In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the "behavioral mediation ...

  9. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    1 Restate your thesis As you set out to write your conclusion and end your essay on an insightful note, you'll want to start by restating your thesis. Since the thesis is the central idea of your entire essay, it's wise to remind the reader of the purpose of your paper.

  10. Conclusions

    A great conclusion should include: A clear link back to the question. This is usually the first thing you do in a conclusion and it shows that you have (hopefully) answered it. A sentence or two that summarise (s) your main argument but in a bit more detail than you gave in your introduction.

  11. PDF The Oxford Phrasal Academic Lexicon™

    The Oxford Phrasal Academic Lexicon (OPAL) is a set of four word lists that together provide an essential guide to the most important words and phrases to know in the field of English for Academic Purposes (EAP). This list gives around 370 important phrases for academic writing, grouped into 15 functional areas. Written phrases 1.

  12. 40 Useful Words and Phrases for Top-Notch Essays

    4. That is to say. Usage: "That is" and "that is to say" can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: "Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.". 5. To that end. Usage: Use "to that end" or "to this end" in a similar way to "in order to" or "so".

  13. How to write a captivating essay conclusion

    If we asked you to list a few synonyms for an essay conclusion, we're willing to bet you'd come up with a few words or phrases like "recap", "summary", "restatement of your thesis", and so on. And it's true you're likely to find all of these somewhere in the conclusion of an essay.

  14. 17 Essay Conclusion Examples (Copy and Paste)

    1. Argumentative Essay Conclusions Version 1 The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of _____________. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as ____________, it remains clear that the benefits/merits of _____________ far outweigh the potential downsides.

  15. Introductions & Conclusions

    Conclusions for academic papers. An academic conclusion paragraph reminds your reader of the main points of your paper and summarizes the "take away" or significance of the conversation. Think of your conclusion as an upside-down introduction paragraph. Returning to the triangle analogy from academic introductions: Specific

  16. 17 academic words and phrases to use in your essay

    1. Firstly, secondly, thirdly Even though it sounds obvious, your argument will be clearer if you deliver the ideas in the right order. These words can help you to offer clarity and structure to the way you expose your ideas. This is an extremely effective method of presenting the facts clearly.

  17. PDF ACADEMIC WRITING

    Academic writing is built upon three truths that aren't self-evident: - Writing is Thinking : While "writing" is traditionally understood as the expression of thought, we'll redefine "writing" as the thought

  18. Transitional Words and Phrases

    Transitional words and phrases can create powerful links between ideas in your paper and can help your reader understand the logic of your paper. However, these words all have different meanings, nuances, and connotations. Before using a particular transitional word in your paper, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely and be sure…

  19. 35 Transition Words for Conclusions (2024)

    1. In conclusion This phrase is typically used to signal the final remarks in a piece of writing. It helps summarize the main points or findings that have been discussed throughout the text. It is still generally appropriate to use, but can sometimes appear rudimentary use of the English language. Sample Sentences:

  20. Academic Essay: From Start to A+ Finish

    By thoughtfully exploring the body text's length and crafting effective paragraphs, you create a main body that is both engaging and informative, tailored to the unique requirements of your academic essay writing. Concluding Your Essay. The conclusion of your essay serves as the grand finale, leaving a lasting impression on your reader.

  21. Essay Conclusion

    1. Short and to the point The final part of the essay is definitely not for long reflections and new suggestions. The point is to recap all the information you have presented above. Do not overload your readers. 2. Memorable Use eye-catching phrases to conclude your essay. You can reach this goal by selecting the most suitable words. 3. Valuable

  22. Useful Academic Expressions & Phrases For Essay Writing

    These useful academic expressions, words, vocabulary and phrases will help you to write a top-notch essay. Writing an essay can be a challenging task. However it becomes simpler if it is divided into manageable pieces. There are three main parts in an essay: an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. You can easily overcome your essay writing ...

  23. What Are Good Sentence Starters for Essays?

    Good sentence starters to establish cause and effect. It's common to use two different sentences to discuss a cause-and-effect relationship, as in something making something else happen. Sentence starters can make this relationship clear and show which sentence is the cause and which is the effect. As a result . . .

  24. 50+ Synonyms for "In Conclusion" with Examples

    53.4k SHARES Crafting a well-rounded conclusion is essential to the impact of your writing. It's the final opportunity to emphasize the main points and create a lasting impression. While the classic phrase "in conclusion" signals the end of your discourse, it can become tiresome with overuse.